September 11, 2019

The rain brought out the wildlife... on Picnic Point.

I thought the little frog was spectacular...



... and then: the huge turtle:

40 comments:

rehajm said...

He looks snappy. I'm staying away from that one regardless...

Nonapod said...

Comedian Bill Burr on the problems with trying to control language:

There’s all this weird thing where everybody in public is the most caring person ever–and then they go back to the exact life they were living when they go home. And I understand it. Its heart is in the right place, but they... You can’t just change words and think that will change people’s attitudes... to change as a person is a ton of work. It requires a lot of work by the individual. It’s not simply other people going, “Don’t say this word now, say that word.” And then, magically, they're going to be like, “Oh!” It’s not the case that because they don’t use that other word, they’re not going to be thinking ignorant things about whatever group that word was used negatively against before. It’s a pipe dream.

PuertoRicoSpaceport.com said...

That's some good eating right there. Did you take the turtle home with you?

It is illegal to eat sea turtles in the US. Before it became illegal, it was available in most seafood restaurants here. Even after it became illegal you could order "veal" and, if the restaurant knew you, get a turtle steak.

Yum!

Is it legal to eat land turtles in the US or are they protected?

I hope this is not off topic, Ann. After all, you are the one who posted the video of lunch.

John Henry

JohnAnnArbor said...

I like turtles.

Fernandistein said...

Very strange to find a snapping turtle on land - laying eggs?

Wince said...

Wasn't that a toad?

And it looked like you blurred the turtle's face to hide his identity.

Mitch McConnell?

Fernandistein said...

Very strange to find a snapping turtle on land - laying eggs?

Not so strange and not laying eggs this time of year.

"These turtles travel extensively over land to reach new habitats or to lay eggs." - wiki.

Fernandistein said...

Wasn't that a toad?

Hoppy the Happy Hoptoad is a Friend to All!

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

I love those little frogs. They must love the moisture.

We had a spring, many years back, that brought out the mini-frogs. They were everywhere on this front range property in the foothills. Have not seen them since.

Ann Althouse said...

I've researched the turtles of Wisconsin now, and I believe it is a snapping turtle: the size, the tail, the sawtooth back edge of the shell. I don't know if the video conveys the size of the thing. I included the men's shoes entirely for scale. I'd say from nose to the end of the tail it was 2 feet long.

Skylark said...

The French Canadians around here like days like that to stock up on frogs.

Skylark said...

In the fall on certain days, there are so many frogs in the road it gets sort of slick.

Calypso Facto said...

"Wasn't that a toad?" Yes, an American Toad, Wisconsin's only toad species.
"I've researched the turtles" Sorry, didn't know there was even a question about that being a Common Snapping Turtle or I'd have confirmed earlier. Found throughout the state -- but, yes, large adults are impressive in person! (And can live to be 170 or more.)

Ralph L said...

Good thing they don't have buffalo in Wisconsin.

Calypso Facto said...

"Is it legal to eat land turtles in the US or are they protected?"

Different in each state, but most states have at least one species of turtle legal for hunting (typically, the snapping turtle at least).

In Wisconsin, turtling is almost wide-open in season:
"Frogs: The open season for frogs runs from the Saturday nearest May 1 through December 31.
There is no open season for bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, in Jefferson County. Frogs
may not be taken or collected from the wild during the closed season.
Turtles: The open season for aquatic turtles runs from July 15 through November 30. Turtles or turtle eggs may not be taken or collected during the closed season, unless authorized by the department."

Now I'll have to do some digging, because I'm curious about the "bullfrogs in Jefferson County" exception ...

Calypso Facto said...

"Good thing they don't have buffalo in Wisconsin."

An estimated 7,000 bison in Wisconsin. But Ann's not likely to run across any on Picnic Point ...

gilbar said...

Ann Althouse said... I've researched the turtles of Wisconsin now, and I believe it is a snapping turtle

Hell to the YEAH! that was a snapping turtle! I wish i'd been there, i would have bet you A DOLLAR that you didn't have the guts to put your hand in front of its mouth.
If you had, i would have paid you the dollar; while i Laughed and Laughed!

There's a Genetic thing, where Snapping Turtles CAN'T breed in the pond they've been living in; but Must ALWAYS cross a road (i this case, trail?) every year. My old roommate (not the one from Nashua) used to live on a farm with two ponds, one on each side of the county highway. Each year, All* the snapping turtles in one pond would cross the road to the other pond. They go out with a (LONG)stick, and hold the stick out in front of Mr Snapper; who'd bite onto it. Then you could carry up to the house, and chop off the head: mmm Turtle soup, coming up!
I think THAT's where the old "why did the chicken?" thing came from; either the chicken thought it was a snapping turtle, or the riddle got messed up

All* how the hell would I know? It's what he said; maybe it was Most? Maybe it was LOTS

Begonia said...

What does turtle soup taste like?

I've had frog soup and it kind of tasted like a cross between chicken and fish. The consistency of the meat was like a soft chicken, but there was a bit of a fishy flavor. Is that what turtle soup is like?

iowan2 said...

Fun. Walking and enjoying the world. And learning! Think about this experience and go back 25 years.Doing what was almost impossible in 1994. Sharing a simple, yet interesting experience with the world, in real time, and two way communication, with VIDEO! Adding to the experience is the ability to pull out of you pocket, a couple full sets of encyclopedias, to research what you are seeing, get corresponding information from the state and local Dept of Natural resources, and pass that information on to your friends.
I am just gob-smacked when I do stuff like that, and experience it. Last night we got a short video of you grandsons playing flag football.
Today we are rich beyond comprehension.

That moved like a toad. But I don't really care. Still fun. We've been doing some landscaping projects, and the dog cannot stay away from the toads. No matter how much she foams at the mouth, she always goes after the next toad to move. (To most prey, sitting still does make them invisible.) Turtles are always neat.

FrankiM said...

If there’s a next life, who knows what we’ll come back as. Frog or snapping turtle or turkey, or a better more loving human being hopefully.

gilbar said...

Another Iowan points out that ....
Doing what was almost impossible in 1994. Sharing a simple, yet interesting experience with the world, in real time, and two way communication, with VIDEO!


in 1994:
A camera the size of a breadbox
This would have required a following TV truck, with satellite hookup
A satellite
A TV studio
Another Satellite
A LOT more TV studios
A lot of SHF transmitters to towers
A LOT of Towers (with Transmitters)
A LOT of TV's

Of course, NOW there are a LOT of Cell towers instead. But we lose
The Camera, the Truck and the studios

Today we are rich beyond comprehension.
AND if you're Poor, The Government will give you an O'Bama phone

Phidippus said...

Snapper soup is great. It has a kind of a tart brininess, combined with peppery spiciness. A bit like Manhattan (red) clam chowder in that respect.

The meat looks like well-braised beef brisket. Not at all fishy. If you're ever in Philadelphia, ask a local to recommend a restaurant downtown that has it and order a Yards Philly Pale Ale to wash it down.

The ponds around here are full of snappers. Their personality matches their looks. They are much better cooked than in person. They will cheerfully eat ducklings, frogs, human toes, etc.

On my morning walk today I saw an Eastern Painted Turtle (Chrysemys sp.) in the midst of crossing the road in the hood here. Carapace about 6 inches long. He was headed west so I carried him over to the west side of the road where the creek goes underneath it. I could imagine an absent-minded neighbor or school bus nailing him, so I did my good deed for the day.

It's an attractive species, mild-mannered, and reportedly edible as well.

FullMoon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
traditionalguy said...

The Wet Tortuga's.

Guildofcannonballs said...

This is a link for all you oldies out there. WE NEW SCHOOL!

stevew said...

Snapping turtles around here are much more severe looking in that the shell has more pronounced ridges and they are more pointed and sharply defined. They get big too. Two feet though, that's a big turtle.

The market in Boston's Chinatown has baskets full of turtles for sale; eels and frogs too. Intended as food, not pets.

gilbar said...

stevew makes a Good Point, saying...
Snapping turtles around here are much more severe looking in that the shell has more pronounced ridges and they are more pointed and sharply defined.


I hadn't noticed the lack of ridge of this turtle b4 Stevew pointed it out. It Might NOT be a snapper.... I'd STILL bet a dollar to Any of you to put your hand in front of it.

BJM said...

Ah, the story little frog will have to tell of narrowly escaping a pale one-eyed, two-legged monster. It will be sung "brekekekex koax koax" down the ages.

Gordon Scott said...

The photo that leads the video makes the turtle look like he's about 4 inches, not two feet.

I note a man wearing shorts in the video.

Gordon Scott said...

Once upon a time a sailing ship rounding Tierra del Fuego at the tip of South America would sail northwestward into the Pacific Ocean. Apparently there was an area off what is now Chile that was well stocked with sea turtles. Ships would harvest dozens and keep them in the hold, alive, for later consumption. Fresh meat would have been a real treat on a voyage like that.

Calypso Facto said...

"the shell has more pronounced ridges and they are more pointed and sharply defined"

That'd be an Alligator Snapping Turtle. "The shell of alligator snapping turtle has three distinctive ridges, while the common snapper's shells are smoother." No alligator snappers native to Wisconsin.

Quaestor said...

Archeologists have discovered that the most common remains in the middens of paleolithic North Americans aren't M. americanum, the American mastodon in spite of the popular depiction of Clovis People as "mammoth hunters", or even deer, it's turtle — various kinds — terrapins, tortoises, but most commonly snappers and softshell turtles. Why? Preservation.

rcocean said...

Why use wikipedia? Just use your finger next time.

rcocean said...

LOL. it never occurred to me that people would "Hunt" turtles. Leave the poor things alone.

gilbar said...

rcocean said... Why use wikipedia? Just use your finger next time.

Seriously, i'll bet ANYONE here $1 that they don't have the guts to do it.

RBE said...

I had sea turtle soap every night at dinner while a guest at an inn on a cay in the Abacos during the mid-1960's. Incredible place and one of the prettiest crescent beaches I have ever been to. The soup was great. I was 11 or so and thought it was cool to eat turtle soup...Such a green snapper maybe a young adult?

Skylark said...

“Beautiful soup, so rich and green
waiting in a hot tureen.

Skylark said...

You should really click on my link above, it’s Gene Wilder from Alice in Wonderland on YouTube.

Big Mike said...

@Althouse, if it really was that large then it has to be a snapping turtle. Color seems off, but it's too large to be a spotted turtle.

Ingachuck'stoothlessARM said...

it's the German variety

invite it over for schnapps