August 27, 2019

"Human Era Ending?"



That's how Drudge looks right now. The link on "human era ending" goes to "Cyborgs will replace humans and remake the world, James Lovelock says/'Our supremacy as the prime understanders of the cosmos is rapidly coming to end'" (NBC). As for big tech planning "social scores," the article is "Uh-oh: Silicon Valley is building a Chinese-style social credit system/In China, scoring citizens’ behavior is official government policy. U.S. companies are increasingly doing something similar, outside the law" (Fast Company).

ADDED: By "right now," I was referring to the page as it looked at 2019/08/27 Tue 07:47:10 EST. At 2019/08/27 Tue 07:48:10 EST, it did not look like that anymore. Accuracy achieved via the DrudgeReportArchives.com.

54 comments:

rehajm said...

That's how Drudge looked Sunday night. Sounds like era of humans around to update the page at Drudge has ended.

sean said...

Less there than meets the eye, when it comes to Western tech companies. A handful of disconnected private systems, most of them regulating access to things that most people don't want (like AirBNB). If such systems become more pervasive, to rival the credit reporting services, legislative bodies will unquestionably respond to with laws regulating such private ratings, mandating explanations and appeals, allowing judicial review, providing for damages for unjustified actions, etc.

Jeff Brokaw said...

Anybody who thinks this is a good idea is either dangerously naive and unimaginative, or power-mad and seeking dominance, or some of both.

Burn the witch, 2020 edition.

Glen Filthie said...

everyone I know is competing to get banned off Facebook with the raunchiest post possible. I can see a low social score being a point of pride for them.

gilbar said...

On Drudge, RIGHT NOW!
PEW: 109 counties have become majority nonhuman since 2000...
ROBOTS ARE TAKING OVER!

henry said...

Under Obama, gun sellers and manufacturers got disconnected from the banking system. Is facial recognition plus MAGA hat enough to get your mortgage denied? This is a real threat.

Koot Katmandu said...

Yeah I am about to remove Drudge from my morning routine. Not what it use to be.

gilbar said...

Koot Katmandu said...
Yeah I am about to remove Drudge from my morning routine. Not what it use to be.


Certainly seems like a certain Professor Emeritus from Wisconsin wakes up a LOT earlier than Drudge does
If i had to choose between sites, it'd be EASY. Drudge has NEVER sent me free mouse stickers!

Phidippus said...

Let's see: NBC News, Drudge, Fast Company.

Uh huh. I'll give this subject all the consideration it deserves.

Fernandistein said...

Apparently The Era of the End of the Human Era has already ended and Drudge is back to the Era of Trump.

Fernandistein said...

I like the way they used the scary-sounding phrase "outside the law" to mean "completely legal".

Ruh roh!

Robert Cook said...

"Under Obama, gun sellers and manufacturers got disconnected from the banking system."

Really? What does that mean?

It seems the gun industry was better off under Obama.

Char Char Binks said...

Oh well. We've had a good run.

Nonapod said...

I visit Drudge about once every couple months out of morbid curiosity. It's sort of like hearing about an old highschool classmate who became a meth addict. It's a depressing, cautionary tale.

Seeing Red said...

Nice try, Cookie. They sold more but if you can’t process payments...or put your money in a bank to run your business....

Rusty said...

Somebody's lookin' to get hurt.

Rusty said...

Robert.
It meant they couldn't do business with a bank. make deposits, write checks, take out a loan etc.

Ingachuck'stoothlessARM said...

skip the drudgery-- The Liberty Daily is more fun !

mockturtle said...

And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Rev. 13:17

I'm becoming convinced that the 'beast' is Big Tech.

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

"I can see a low social score being a point of pride for them."

Truer than anyone understands. The saving grace of America in these days of indoctrination and relentless social scolding is this deeply, almost genetically, held attitude that Faulkner described so succinctly-

"not in the attitude of what must I do but what do you think you think you would like for me to do if you was able to make me do it.

MadTownGuy said...

8/27/19, 7:56 AM

sean said...
"Less there than meets the eye, when it comes to Western tech companies. A handful of disconnected private systems, most of them regulating access to things that most people don't want (like AirBNB). If such systems become more pervasive, to rival the credit reporting services, legislative bodies will unquestionably respond to with laws regulating such private ratings, mandating explanations and appeals, allowing judicial review, providing for damages for unjustified actions, etc."
8/27/19, 7:58 AM


The big picture difference is that corporations (and other like organizations) have the ability to exploit; governments are unique in their ability to oppress, and that with the power of the gun. And under such governmental control, there remains no room for judicial review or appeal.

cubanbob said...

Ingachuck'stoothlessARM said...
skip the drudgery-- The Liberty Daily is more fun !"

Thanks for the tip! I like the way they use Drudge's style.

cubanbob said...

How will I be rated if I have no social media? Will Uber and Lyft turn me down forcing me to hire a cab instead? Horrors!. I don't AirBnb so that isn't a problem for me. As for insurance companies, well if you lie on an application and they find it out they can deny your claim so don't be an idiot and post things that will cause you to have your claim rejected. However one does run the risk of someone else posting you doing something stupid that would result in your claim getting denied so there's that. For the lawyers here, is that actionable against the social media poster?

Robert Cook said...

"It meant they couldn't do business with a bank. make deposits, write checks, take out a loan etc."

Did that really happen? I can't find anything online describing it.

Skippy Tisdale said...

"Did that really happen? I can't find anything online describing it."

Ignorance is no defense of untruths:

Bank of America to stop lending to some gun manufacturers in wake of Parkland massacre

https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-bank-of-america-gun-manufacturers-loans-20180412-story.html

Robert Cook said...

"Ignorance is no defense of untruths"

Hmmm. I don't know how anyone can spin the voluntary business decisions of individual banks that were made in 2018 (in response to a 2018 mass shooting at the Parkland school) as "Obama disconnected gun sellers from the banking system."

Are there other, earlier examples that show Obama administration involvement in disconnecting gun sellers from banks?

Yancey Ward said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Yancey Ward said...

Rehajm, with the first comment, has noted something I started to notice about a year ago- DrudgeReport isn't updated very often any longer. It used to be that you could click on the site about every couple of hours and get lots of new news stories and links, but now it can go an entire day without a single update- even RealClear sites are updated more often, they are only done twice a day. It does look like Drudge is starting to lose his passion for his work.

Yancey Ward said...

I doubt the social credit thing will happen in the US- hypocrites on the left will prevent it from really gaining a foothold- I mean seriously, just look at the angst criticism of air travel causes them. And in a country full of weapons, corporations that push too far to the left in their persecution of free speech and assembly are going to find their executives literally hunted down and assassinated.

SeanF said...

Robert Cook: Are there other, earlier examples that show Obama administration involvement in disconnecting gun sellers from banks?

Operation Choke Point.

Yancey Ward said...

Yes, Operation Choke Point was a deliberate attempt to shut down banking access to firearms dealers, legal and otherwise. In fact, the biggest targets were all legal businesses- they weren't being charged for conducting illegal operations, the Obama Administration was deliberately by-passing due process altogether.

n.n said...

Selective-child. Social progress. Diversity. Forward-looking, notably progressive policies.

Robert Cook said...

"Operation Choke Point."

Thank you. I had not been aware of that. I do see on quick skimming that the Justice Department indicated in August 2017 they would end Operation Choke Point. It does not seem to have been only about gun sellers, though, but about businesses the administration (they claim) believed were involved in fraudulent behavior, (e.g., banks and other financial businesses, such as "payday loan" providers--legal loan sharks), in addition to some gun sellers. If these businesses were not engaged in fraud and were not, therefore, prosecuted for fraud, Operation Choke Point was certainly egregious.

Yancey Ward said...

Robert, the point is this- they could have charged the businesses with fraudulent behavior, but didn't do so. The question for you, is this- why did they do Operation Choke Point in place of a criminal prosecution on a company by company basis? And note- these lists were not of specific companies suspected of fraud, but broad categories of companies where fraud might have happened. In other words, the banks were being forced to not do business with the broad categories of companies without proof the claimed fraud. The operation was formally ended in August of 2017, but the Obama Administration had been forced to back down when the FDIC finally figured out that what was going on was technically unconstitutional- in other words, the FDIC knew they were going to lose in court if it wasn't ended. Of course, since then, banks have taken up the initiative themselves to blacklist certain kinds of legal businesses, as the BoA article linked above shows. Those are also facing legal challenges and are likely to cause the bank to pay out large settlements.

Robert Cook said...

Yancey Ward,

As I said, it appears to be have been extremely egregious behavior by the Obama administration.

daskol said...

That's quite an example of civil discourse set by Mr. Cook.

The SON ended chokepoint but many banks are still wary of banking firms in industries previously targeted because there's an understandable fear that the next admin may decide to use financial regs and bank examining authority to advance it's electoral strategy in similar fashion. While examiners are no longer inquiring about what banks are doing to reduce a their sxposure, that hasn't undone the damage.

daskol said...

Er, DOJ, not SON.

JaimeRoberto said...

One of the things I appreciate about Robert Cook is his ability to absorb new information and adjust his position. I hope that someday, if I am ever wrong, that I will be able to do the same.

mockturtle said...

Cookie is a man whom we can respect even when we disagree with him, which is most of the time. Nicely dealt, Cookie!

Phidippus said...

JaimeRoberto: Agreed, and I hope I live long enough to see how I will perform if ever challenged in such a way ;-)

Michael K said...

If the people who coded the Obamacare web sites are behind the Skynet thing, I will not be too worried for a few years.

Robert Cook said...

Well, thanks for the nice comments, folks, but I was not a fan of Obama or his administration. I considered him to be a terrible president who betrayed all those who believed in him, (many of whom still believe in the cynical myth of "hope and change").

rehajm said...

Remember too BoA and the other major banks were de facto socialized during the Obama administration. Government added board members and c suite officials. The actual bankers at BoA needed to ask permission to use the restroom from the internal government employees. BoA didn’t get permission to do business to gun related companies.

rehajm said...

Disclosure: did lots of business with BoA...

Robert Cook said...

Are you referring to when BoA (and other banks) took billions in bail out tax money during the financial collapse last decade and therefore had to abide by government oversight? Or to when BoA were later fined over $16 billion due to massive fraud before and during the financial crisis? Frankly, they were damned lucky (and the American taxpayers grievously betrayed) that none of their executives were prosecuted or sent to prison. Obama even announced at a tense meeting of the bankers that he was the only thing protecting them from the (angry public's) pitchforks. BoA and the other banks did very well as a result of the transfer of the people's money into the hands of the banks, (who handed out huge bonuses to their top execs with some of the bailout money).

Ken B said...

I guess Drudge has always lived on clicks, but he feels more click-baity now.

gilbar said...

Robert Cook? A personal Question for you, please?
Who was the last President that you Were a big fan of? Or; Who was the last President you hated least?
I've always wondered that. It's not really relevant; but i've wondered and wondered
thanx!

Ken B said...

Cookie and I might agree in a peculiar way. I thought Obama a poor President, but not nearly as bad as I expected.

mockturtle said...

Cookie at 4:47, right you are! And I took my money out of BoA and invested in a smaller bank. Not that any banks are entirely blameless but the biggest are the worst.

daskol said...

There was a coercive aspect to disbursement of TARP funds: all the banks identified as posing systemic risk to the economy had to take the funds. That’s because if only the insolvent ones partook, there would have been a run on them. A couple of the banks who had influential major shareholders made noise about that, but only a little, despite a lot of equity de facto being wiped out in the restructuring thanks to stock prices that never recovered.

rehajm said...

What crimes did BoA executives commit?

BoA was in relatively good shape and was goaded into taking on Countrywide during the financial crisis. Then the Obama administration blamed BoA for Countrywide’s problems and weakened the financial system through by raiding the assets via ‘fines’ to give to political allies.

But it’s the bank executives that committed unknown crimes.

rehajm said...

There’s always revisionist history around banks and lending and the last financial crisis is no exception. Politicians get off scott free. Barney Frank the major resistor of improved regulation before the crisis is revered as a wise old sage who regularly makes the rounds on the financial channels to impart his wisdom.

It’s like asking OJ on The CNN panel to discuss the search for the real killers.

Robert Cook said...

"Who was the last President that you Were a big fan of? Or; Who was the last President you hated least?"

I can't say I've been a "big fan" of any presidents in my lifetime, (I was born during Eisenhower's presidency, and I faintly remember the Nixon-Kennedy election, as the polling place where my parents voted--for Nixon--was in the basement of my then-kindergarten). In fact, I think it's dangerous for any of us to become "fans" of any president. This hinders our critical faculties and tends to lead us to justify "our" president's actions, as, to avoid cognitive dissonance, we do not want to admit that "our" president may not be performing competently, ethically, or with good intentions. These people are essentially our hirelings, charged with managing affairs of state (presumably) for our benefit. We should always view any president critically and with suspicion, always asking ourselves, is this person performing well, doing things I agree with, etc.

I'd say the one I disliked least, (as I really didn't dislike him at all), was the first president I was able to vote for, Gerald Ford. Carter had some good qualities, (and bad), but was an ineffectual president. From Reagan on it's been a shit show.

Robert Cook said...

What crimes did BoA executives commit?

One brief passage:

“'For years, Countrywide and Bank of America unloaded toxic mortgage loans on the government sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with false representations that the loans were quality investments,' said U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara for the Southern District of New York. 'This office has already obtained a jury verdict of fraud and a judgment for over a billion dollars against Countrywide and Bank of America for engaging in similar conduct. Now, this settlement, which requires the bank to pay another billion dollars for false statements to the GSEs, continues to send a clear message to Wall Street that mortgage fraud cannot be a cost of doing business.'”