May 27, 2020

"Because what if no one picks you for their bubble? And how do you decide who belongs in yours? How do you issue an invitation, or reject one?"

"What if your parents swear they’ve been following the rules and are dying to see their grandchildren, but you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means? What if you’re desperate to hang out with your bestie, but she’s already committed to a guy she met three weeks ago on a dating app and wants to get to know in person? And again: What if no one picks you?... If the very thought of being picked last or going completely, utterly unchosen is giving you flashbacks to junior high where Michelle Goldman said that you couldn’t sit at her table in the cafeteria because all the seats were taken when clearly all the seats were not taken, I am right there with you. And would like to remind you that you are a successful, accomplished, beloved adult and also how many novels has Michelle published?"

Writes Jennifer Weiner in "The Quarantine Bubbles Are Coming and I, for One, Am Stressed/How do you decide who belongs in yours? What if you join and find it’s not working out? And what if you aren’t invited to one at all?" (NYT).

1. Jennifer Weiner has published 13 novels.

2. Is "observant" a standard term people are using to mean observing the rules about coronavirus? The most standard meaning of "observant" — used as shorthand — has to do with religion, meaning actually following the rules and not merely identifying with the culture of the religion.

3. There's an obsolete meaning of "observant" — "Deferential, respectful; considerately attentive; assiduous in service; obsequious" (OED). Mary Wollstonecraft used it in "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman" (1791): Would men but generously snap our chains, and be content with rational fellowship, instead of slavish obedience, they would find us more observant daughters, more affectionate sisters, more faithful wives, more reasonable mothers — in a word, better citizens."

4. Imagine extending the separation of grandchildren and grandparents for more months because your parents watch Fox News. It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts.

5. Are you worried about the coming "bubbles" — these enclosed groups of households that are phasing out of one-household-only lockdowns? Is it obvious which other household you'd take on as part of your bubble or are you beset with other households who'd like to bubble-ize you?

6. What's the bigger bubble problem — being left outside of any good bubble like the high-schooler who can't find a table in the cafeteria or having too many people who want you in their bubble? I think the latter is the bigger problem, because you can always continue to shelter alone, and no one sees how alone you are. It's not like standing there in front of the whole school holding a tray, feeling unwanted, and getting rejections right in your face.

7. If you weren't one of the popular kids in high school, but you've become a pretty successful adult, how do you feel about the popular kids now? Do you think about them at all? Do you still agonize about whether you are popular? Or are you a popular adult?

8. If you are a popular adult, did you learn anything interesting from your time in seclusion? Have you changed what you want out of relationships, or are you just eager to get back to socializing?

9. If the seclusion for you was not that different from the way you were living before the virus, are you wistful seeing other people wonder and worry about their bubbles, or are you ready to see your lifestyle once again reserved for those who come about it only in ways that have nothing to do with the virus?

10. Do you want a bubble but not know how — or not have the nerve — to ask anyone to be in yours? What if all the people who you might ask feel the same way too? What if that's not so different from how you and they were living in non-virus times?

110 comments:

Ann Althouse said...

I like this from the comments over there. Somebody says:

"This has been an ongoing conversation between me and my husband. His oldest friend (from kindergarten) has invited us to the apt attached to her house in the Hamptons. We will have dinner with them at night on their porch outdoors. We have alternately shared our reservations about the arrangement. On one hand, we go there every summer for a few days to spend time with her and her husband, and getting out of the city is definitely a good idea. On the other hand, seeing two other people regularly for at least an hour and a half dinner every night seems a much bigger risk than anything we have experience during COVID. Ultimately, we need to get out in the world and we have decided to take the risk. And yes, I realize that we are very privileged that this is our dilemma."

Somebody else says:

"You've analyzed your "dilemma" and decided to "take the risk" to dine on the porch outdoors with friends every evening in the Hamptons. Such a risk. Such courage."

rwnutjob said...

Fox News Watchers: New York code for Knuckle dragging Troglodytes from flyover country

MartyH said...

If you’re that insecure then don’t try to bubble with anybody. Become a Covid incel whining about how no one will bubble with you.

MayBee said...

I have said from the beginning that eventually we will have to break the fear bubble. People will get out and they'll see they don't get sick to any great degree and everything will feel ok and then things will be pretty normal again.

It's staying home stuck in the fear bubble that makes the outside seem so scary.

MartyH said...

Hey babe, wanna bubble?

Wilbur said...

AA said: "Imagine extending the separation of grandchildren and grandparents for more months because your parents watch Fox News. It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts."

Almost every leftist I know - and I know a lot of them - thinks this way. Why? The Personal Is Political for them.

Quayle said...

"...because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means?"

Imagine ostensibly intelligent and educated people making statements like that - holding forth that the outcome of one factor indicates where all other factors are set - must be set.

How efficient. You don't have to get to know or understand anyone or any other views. "Tell me three things, and I'll know the rest. Do they watch Fox News?"

Howard said...

We just wear masks and keep our distance and continue to do things with our grandkids and our kids. We're moving to a new house next month and we are going to figure out a way to have the grandkids camp in the backyard so they can start doing overnight stays again.

R C Belaire said...

"Bubbling" is no way for a society to return to functionality. If that's what it takes, well, then we ain't ready. Sad.

Kai Akker said...

Jennifer Weiner = Endless Whining

and that has been true since forever.

Darrell said...

OBEY
CONFORM
ISOLATE
COMPLIANCE

Leland said...

Heh, reporters wanting to live in bubbles. Stepping outside their bubble is perceived as taking a major risk. The truth emerges.

alanc709 said...

Liberals complaining about bubbles. They demand people be placed in bubbles with everything they preach, and then complain about there being bubbles. The willful blindness is staggering.

stevew said...

Interesting questions, and the whole notion of a bubble of people that I approve and they approve being with is clearly real for this writer but completely foreign to me. It is a manufactured problem based on faith not science or reality. Observant is a good word, particularly the definition that references religious rules following.

That second comment is beautiful, and sums up my sense of the article writer clearly and succinctly.

Darrell said...

I can't get an erection anymore unless a woman looks great in a mask. And she is wearing a mask. What should I do, Jennifer Weiner? And are you wearing a mask?

jaydub said...

This column would be better titled "Musings of a Jewish princess."

Roger Sweeny said...

The most standard meaning of "observant" — used as shorthand — has to do with religion, meaning actually following the rules...

This is too easy but ... for some people, isolation has become a sort of religious thing, backed by a supreme authority who you follow without question. Those who don't go along are not observant.

Annie C. said...

Oh for crying out loud! All this navel gazing is much more unhealthy than any damn germ.

Nobody cares about you, your bubble or your narcisstic triggers and neuroses.

David Begley said...

“It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts.”

The right experts told us to expect 2.2 million dead Americans. And now tell us we are going to burn up in 50 years. Righhtt.

Don’t these people realize they are idiots? Models aren’t science and the models were wildly wrong. How’s that for data?

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Such a risk. Such courage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-bogN0V8RM

Also, the article sounds like the meanderings of a middle-school girl. And nobody outside of her literary circle cares how many novels she has published.

Eric said...

Ann, I admire your continued willingness to read these insipid articles, but it's okay for you to cut back. You won't regret it.

Danno said...

If Li'l Rocket Man were to nuke NYC, it just might be a blessing.

Jeff Brokaw said...

There is no need to re-think how you live your life unless you live in a nursing home or have a compromised immune system, or live in NYC metro area.

For the vast majority of people, the constant worrying and stressing is worse for you and a bigger threat to your health. And what is the cost to your mental and emotional health from isolation? It’s not nothing.

We are learning a lot about how bad a lot of people are at assessing risk. I saw one stat the other day that compared the risk of dying from coronavirus, for healthy people under 55 (I think?) to the risk of dying from driving 13-40 miles per day. Neither is worth changing your life for.

Unknown said...

“Humble brag” is the new normal. -willie

PatHMV said...

Some people think education made them smarter, when really it only made them more indecisive.

Balfegor said...

I may have said this here before, but I think the Fox News thing is mostly an attempt at deflection by liberals (and journalists) who know very well that in February, they were the ones banging the "no worse than the flu," "get a grippe," "panic is worse than coronavirus" drum. Liberals who were more or less right about the risks presented by coronavirus don't feel the same psychological need, I think, to pretend that Fox News is the source of all coronavirus skepticism in the country. Because Fox News viewers didn't turn New York into the disaster it is today. Fox News viewers didn't turn DC and the DC suburbs into the number two coronavirus hotspot in the US. These are overwhelmingly progressive enclaves in the US where Fox News is probably mostly hate-watched. But when you -- or people you identify with -- have screwed over your own communities so badly, it's natural to fixate on the Other as the true enemy.

Regarding "bubbles," I think it depends what you're doing. E.g. if you're meeting outside for coffee, maybe sit at an angle rather than head on and don't shout or laugh in each other's faces, and the risk is probably pretty minor. Just don't hug or cheek kiss or anything like that.

The recommendations here have been things like wear a mask even if you have no symptoms, avoid talking to people head-on, play outside rather than indoors, avoid shared dishes in favour of individual plates, avoid eating face to face in favour of eating side by side, etc. To be sure, we're in a very different place than most of the US. Today, there were 11 new cases in Tokyo (population 14 million), up from 10 yesterday, and the positivity rate in testing over the past week was just 1.3%. But I think it's probably good advice in the US too.

And hey, the experts here didn't spend the first three months of the crisis telling people masks don't work, and -- although they were slow to roll out testing -- they didn't contaminate all their tests the way the CDC did, so I feel like they have managed to preserve their credibility in a way the American experts have . . not.

Brian McKim and/or Traci Skene said...

Are these people broken?

stlcdr said...

Seems like she thinks Black Mirror is real...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nosedive_(Black_Mirror)

Ralph L said...

If she were actually informed, she'd know her parents are many times more at risk than her kids.

be content with rational fellowship

Hardin bait.

MadTownGuy said...

Welcome to the New Abnormal.

News flash: there are already cancel culture bubbles from which you're excluded if you don't hate Trump sufficiently.

I should have called it the "Brave New Abnormal," but maybe that's going too far.

Fernandinande said...

What if your parents swear they’ve been following the rules and are dying to see their grandchildren, but you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means?

Then your parents should be killed and you should commit suicide. Don't make it so complicated.

MayBee said...

I get the impression that people have this vague notion that a large group of people or close contact with people creates the virus. Like it starts growing when large numbers congregate.
You can have 2,000 people all crammed in a room and if none of them have the virus, nobody is going to get the virus. You can have 5,000 people go to the beach and if none of them have the virus, nobody is going to get the virus.

All the limits and masks are to a- reduce the odds of someone with COVID being in the group and b-reduce the chance that someone with COVID will get their virus on other people in the group.
Where there are few cases of COVID, the chance of either of those two things happening are vanishingly small.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

For Memorial day we had our next door neighbor over, along with his brother and his brother's wife. The neighbor visits us nearly every day so his dogs can play with ours. The brother and his wife were just back from their yearly trip to the beach. He has a job that puts him in contact with multiple different people daily. All of these people have blue collar jobs. The general opinion among the non-hoi polloi is that the people in charge are out of their damned minds.

John Borell said...

She's way overthinking this. Unless you are in an at-risk group, the flu is more dangerous.

For kids, the flu is significantly more dangerous.

Seriously, though, how do people live life day in and day out if they are this scared?

Live life. Humans are not hard-wired to lockdown forever, whatever the risks.

JPS said...

Ms. Weiner writes:

"you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means?"

Now here's a radical thought: What if you talk to your own freakin' parents and say something like, Hey, I'm worried about us infecting you, so let's talk about how we're going to protect each other. What precautions are we going take? Then, if you disagree with what they say, you say, "I disagree, and here's why"?

Ron Winkleheimer said...

I keep a mask in the car in case I have to go somewhere where I am required to practice face mask theater. All the stores I have been in have the stickers on the ground telling you which way to go so that you won't come closer than six feet. Everyone is ignoring them. I went with my wife on an errand yesterday, I remarked that we were far more likely to die in a car accident going to and from our destination than to die from the kung flu.

NCMoss said...

I want to do what seems reasonable and safe for my family but I hate the of idea that my liberty which was a sacred right before is being permitted or denied by politicians who at one time made an oath to defend and protect those rights. Bubbles and masks and hydroxychloroquine are a grand distraction to that.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Also, while coming back from the errand we were on I-20 going south. We saw multiple vehicles with out of state tags. Clearly a lot of people were returning home from a long weekend spent at the beach.

Craig said...

These bubbles remind me of the alliums in the previous post.

Craig said...

These bubbles remind me of the alliums in the previous post.

Todd said...

People are LITERALLY dying the streets and this is what she is worried about! That she won't be in anyone's "bubble"? She should be grateful! This way when all the food runs out, she won't be eaten first! She can likely find a band of men to take her in where she can trade her "skills" for food and protection!

A bit over the top you think? Same goes for her "article". What a child. No one will pick me! Let me call the wambulance for you! More overblown, self centered angst for an overblown crisis (not a non-existent crisis but an overblown crisis).

Ron Winkleheimer said...

One of the things you learn in security, including computer security, is that there are always trade offs. The more secure you make a system, the less convenient it will be to use. If you make it too inconvenient people will actively seek ways to circumvent the security. Or they won't use the system, they will find some other way to accomplish whatever they are trying to do. Also, the people in charge have to lead by example. It not enough to put out a policy. If the upper echelons don't support the measures taken which includes being seen following them, well then you wasted your time securing the system and writing the policy.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Sorry, make that I-20 going north.

Wa St Blogger said...

Are these people broken?

Yes. Modern education has eschewed critical thinking. They think they are thinking critically, however, they fail to realize they are using a subset of data, making every conclusion incorrect. If you are a big-endian you have to know that anything a little-endian says cannot be true.

Jersey Fled said...

Notice how liberals are always "stressed".

Some might call that psychotic.

Chris N said...

Don’t be a Weiner.

Amadeus 48 said...

I want Jennifer Weiner out of my bubble, and Althouse is on the bubble of my bubble.

The VIRUS is scary, but I am unafraid. I seethe with contempt at lesser mortals. I don't watch Fox News, but I follow Mollie Hemingway on Twitter. I know that Jabba, Heil Whitmer, and Lori Haircuts are lesser leaders because they are afraid. I can smell their fear. They fear that the people will rise up, throw off their shackles, and have a beer with their low-risk friends.

Jessica said...

All of this hand-wringing just seems so... FAKE to me. Maybe it's because I don't live in a liberal "bubble" (of thought and opinion - ha!) but I just don't see any of this mattering in, oh, say, eight weeks. Things are just going to go back to normal. Yes, I know the idea of "normal" is verboten in enlightened circles, but still, I really think that's where we're headed. Humans don't adhere well (or, eventually, at all) to social engineering, especially when said social engineering is based on virtue signalling rather than medical necessity. The virus is on the way out, and so are liberal fever dreams of a planned and controlled social landscape.

Jersey Fled said...

I remarked that we were far more likely to die in a car accident going to and from our destination than to die from the kung flu.

I read somewhere (can't remember where) that if you are less than 25 years of age, this is literally true.

Anxiously awaiting liberals to propose increasing the legal driving age to 25.

Lurker21 said...

There's some kind of appropriation going on here. Younger healthy people acting as though they are at risk in the way that older or sickly people are. Parents acting as though their children were more at risk from the disease than their own parents. "Concern" and "awareness" become a badge of honor, but it seems like those who want the badge are talking it away from those who have a real need to be worried.

It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts.

Not per se maybe, but when you have to say it's not about the politics, it's usually about the politics (when it's not just about the money).

Jersey Fled said...

They think they are thinking critically, however, they fail to realize they are using a subset of data, making every conclusion incorrect

It's not just that they use only limited information, although that certainly is part of it. It's that they think that expressing what they believe to be widely perceived beliefs makes them sound smart.

Bob Boyd said...

What does Karen think about when she's not going off on someone?

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Anxiously awaiting liberals to propose increasing the legal driving age to 25.

You have to forbid anyone under 25 from even being a passenger in a car.

I'm Not Sure said...

"What if your parents swear they’ve been following the rules and are dying to see their grandchildren, but you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means?"

The fact you think people are defined by the news they watch says more about you than it does about them. And it's not good.

Equipment Maintenance said...

If "if it saves just one life it's worth it" is true, why isn't the speed limit 5 mph ?

Jupiter said...

"Weiner has been a vocal critic of what she sees as the male bias in the publishing industry and the media, alleging that books by male authors are better received than those written by women, that is, reviewed more often and more highly praised by critics."

Her books didn't get chosen. Even though the first one was "Good In Bed".

Bruce Hayden said...

“Interesting questions, and the whole notion of a bubble of people that I approve and they approve being with is clearly real for this writer but completely foreign to me. It is a manufactured problem based on faith not science or reality. Observant is a good word, particularly the definition that references religious rules following.”

And, yet, she has the concept that she has The Science behind her. My guess is that her scientific training consisted of the bonehead science courses required for their science distribution, in order to graduate from her liberal arts college. Knew two people in that boat in college. My best friend couldn’t pass an English class. Finally graduated by substituting German. He was no better at writing it, but was so fluent, after spending a year there, that he was often mistaken as a native. And then the daughter of the chair of the History department, a history major herself, almost missed graduation because she couldn’t seem to pass even the bonehead science classes taught for people like her, such as Cosmology and Evolution. (I actually ended up getting off easy by picking up my Humanities credits from Latin and Ancient Civilizations history classes taught by an amazing Classics prof). This woman is clearly a word person, not a science person. She just has membership in a peer group that tells her who the right experts are. Just like she was steered into Essential Oils, and before that, Yoga, crystals, Global Warming, reusable shopping bags, etc. now she is a “bubble person”, while the rest of us, sitting here in flyover country look at her and laughter outrageously. Here, I am far more likely to die from not fastening my seatbelt, than not wearing a mask.

Yet yesterday, I saw two women at the grocery store wearing masks (but no gloves) in a COVID-19 free county, in an almost completely COVID-19 free state. Obviously hand made masks. Likely with a lot of loving care. Do all these mask wearers, and esp of hand made masks, actually wash their masks every day? Some are looking a bit grungy. Wear them in the car? Kinda like a token. Or maybe cargo cult. The difference, is that those on the Fox News side realize that they are wearing their crucifixes and crosses as religious tokens, while the CNN and NYT crowd don't realize that their tokens, their masks, are more religion than science.

Sebastian said...

"4. Imagine extending the separation of grandchildren and grandparents for more months because your parents watch Fox News. It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts."

Not the politics per se, but the politics more than anything.

Which in this case is especially insane: you might want to persuade the grandparents to extend their isolation for their own sake, but the implication that contact endangers children is not "fact-based." Like anything else, for progs supposed facts and experts are just tools. Which is politics: the politics of politicizing everything, for prog purposes, to rule the country as well as everyday life.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

From her Wikipedia entry:

"Weiner has said that she was "one of only nine Jewish kids in her high school class of 400" at Simsbury High School."

So the Jewish population of the school was 2.25%. Jewish population in Connecticut in 2018 was 3.3%, no idea what it was when she was in high school. Yeah, total injustice there.

Yancey Ward said...

I think the solution to the madness we are witnessing is going to be the wide deployment of MAGA Masks everywhere.

Big Mike said...

What if your parents swear they’ve been following the rules and are dying to see their grandchildren, but you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers and who the hell knows what they think 'observant' even means?

And what if your parents then sue you and force you to bring the children around to them? And let you know that they are cutting you out of the will?

Lurker21 said...

I guess Weiner was trying to be funny: 21st century Erma Bombeck. It's getting hard to tell what is intentionally funny from what is unintentionally funny or just strange or annoying or stupid.

People will just going on wearing masks until a vaccine is developed or herd immunity sets in. If you get to know somebody well enough that you feel comfortable taking off your mask it probably won't kill you unless you are in a high-risk group.

Yancey Ward said...

I want to congratulate Michelle Goldman for having the good judgment, and at such a young age, that Jennifer Weiner wasn't someone that anyone should want in their group.

cacimbo said...

Based on Wikipedia info Weiner's rant would be more autobiographical if she was worried that granddad's crack addiction makes him unlikely to be following isolation rules and grandma finally discovering her inner lesbian has her sneaking out to indulge in her newfound sexuality. Instead she goes completely outside her own experience to imagine Fox News viewing grands as the ultimate scare.

William said...

When I think of bubble, I think of soap bubble--something ephemeral and fragile. It doesn't take much to prick a soap bubble, and you don't have to be much of a prick to do it....I wonder if Jennifer has ever considered the possibility that the kids didn't want to sit with her in high school because she's a bit of a drag. I bet she has. The subtext of her novels and all her writings is to prove that this is not the case, that she's not only blameless but virtuous. She'll keep plugging away at it until she convinces herself.

Narr said...

1.13 novels!
2.Y
3.huh.
4.FOX!
5.N
6.n/a
7.Modesty forbids.
8.Seclusion?
9.Could you repeat the question?
10.n/a

Narr
Will you post grades?

Todd said...

Equipment Maintenance said...

If "if it saves just one life it's worth it" is true, why isn't the speed limit 5 mph ?

5/27/20, 8:50 AM


Are you friggen CRAZY?!?

Do you not UNDERSTAND that cars are powered by either exploding petro-chemicals OR via an electron transmission process that involved either high voltage or high amperage?!? Both of which can easily KILL you! We need to ban EVERYONE [but suitably trained emergency personnel] from being transported in any mechanized conveyance!

Walking is the ONLY safe way to travel!

If it saves one life!

Do it for the children!

Temujin said...

My God. What have they done with all the real New Yorkers? And who are these creatures that have taken over the city and have become the only voices heard from Gotham? These whiny, hand-wringing, self-righteous while at the same time self-hating voices.
It's like Invasion of the Body Snatchers has actually happened. In New York. The actual New Yorkers who were marvelously regular folks, yet strong, bullish, fiercely independent, creative, and visionary have been replaced by weak-minded, clone-thinkers, who gaze incessantly at their own navels and find them lacking. Then write about it in the New York Times or the New Yorker or New York.

It's gobsmacking how narrow their thinking and how loud their howling.

Kai Akker said...

"Do all these mask wearers, and esp of hand made masks, actually wash their masks every day? Some are looking a bit grungy." --Bruce Hayden

Wash my mask? C'mon man, it needs seasoning. I spit in it, work it around, I figure it will last me as long as my infield glove.

Kai Akker said...

"If you get to know somebody well enough that you feel comfortable taking off your mask it..."

... means I am getting serious in my courtship thing. It invites her to match my gesture. After the masks....

va va voom

Freeman Hunt said...

Obviously grandparents come first. It seems like this would be more obvious to people who are afraid that the grandparents might die from the virus this year. My bubble includes a pair of very careful, Fox News watching grandparents. I love my friends and am used to seeing a group of them a few times a week and others once a week or so. I will be very happy to get back to seeing them. But until then, grandparents first.

Around here, many families are bubbling with grandparents only. It's the most common bubble.

tcrosse said...

It reminds me of George Costanza playing Trivial Pursuits with the Bubble Boy. Moops!

Pookie Number 2 said...

but you’re not ready to risk it because they’re Fox News viewers

I’ll bet that the Fox News cameramen don’t even wear masks when they’re filming.

I would love to understand why the political beliefs that typically favor more government intrusion so consistently overlap with the bigoted demonization of others, whether those others are African-Americans in the 60s or political conservatives today.

Nichevo said...


Blogger Temujin said...
My God. What have they done with all the real New Yorkers?


Indeed, where do these pod people come from? It's a shanda.


4. Imagine extending the separation of grandchildren and grandparents for more months because your parents watch Fox News. It's not the politics, per se, but the Fox News as evidence that they're not fact-based, not connecting with science and the right experts.

I'd say "take off your clothes" but anyone pitching this line already has.

JAORE said...

A FaceBook friend from high school days launches Orange Man Bad memes every hour on the hour. OK, an exaggeration, but barely one). She has accused anyone of being granny killers if they hint of ending the lock down.

Today she rejoiced on FB because her Veterinarian game to see her horses. I ALMOST asked if she was horrified because her horses are Granny killers.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

I want to congratulate Michelle Goldman for having the good judgment, and at such a young age, that Jennifer Weiner wasn't someone that anyone should want in their group.

Not only was Weiner one of only nine Jewish kids attending her high school, but the other Jewish kids didn't want to hang around with her. Ouch!

D 2 said...

Sounds like she is generally ok with being hesitant to allow someone (family member at that!) into her home based on what she perceives is the tv news station that they watch most regularly. Leading to three questions:

1. How does she determine what is too much and too little Fox News watching? Is this a stat known to others? Surely you need to watch some amount of Fox News to know it is bad. So it can’t be 0%, can it? I mean, it seems logical that many deplorables read NYT articles and think they are shite, but that’s because Althouse posts about them. It’s not an ignorant assumption. So how much Fox News does she watch, to know it’s shite, or is her knowledge an immaculate conception sort of thing?

2. If they (family members!) aren’t allowed at her home, how much convincing do you think she would need to be convinced that it would be better for any Fox News watching knuckle dragging assholes to be safely removed from the Eloi, or whatever term she might use to define her smart bubble friends. Surely it would be easier to bubble up the non compliant in a camp somewhere, so she can go to the opera in peace, secure that the theatre will not be defiled by lesser sorts.

3. Honestly, as she ever wondered whether there is a chance for turnabout on her of these concepts? Should the plumber ask her if she watches Fox before fixing her sink? If she or a family member was a victim of a hit and run, should the passers by check to see if she voted the right way?

O brave new world that has such people in it

tim d said...

jfc, who cares

Michael K said...

Yet yesterday, I saw two women at the grocery store wearing masks (but no gloves) in a COVID-19 free county, in an almost completely COVID-19 free state.

Do you mean to tell me there are Democrats in Montana ?

Well, I guess the billionaires with fenced gentlemen's ranches that close off elk migration routes would be.

n.n said...

Bubbles with "benefits".

Birches said...

I'm happy that I have a happy marriage, a lot of kids and a church responsibility that I can do over zoom. I really haven't been lonely at all. I think most of my friends are in the same situation. We've still been so busy! Now we've only been living in our area for a year and a half. If a bunch of ladies I knew were bubbling together, I don't think I would be offended.

Big Mike said...

Models aren’t science and the models were wildly wrong.

Especially the model Robbie Mook used to steer Hillary’s campaign. But 21st century Democrats are incapable of learning from their mistakes.

Wilbur said...

Kai Akker said...
Wash my mask? C'mon man, it needs seasoning. I spit in it, work it around, I figure it will last me as long as my infield glove.
********************************************************

I recommend Glovolium. Keeps my mask soft and pliable.


Big Mike said...

Over on her blog Sarah Hoyt asks the right question:

“ Can we leave the liberals in their bunkers, cyanide at the ready, while the rest of us resume life? Because this is insane”

tommyesq said...

11. Is Michelle Goldman a real person, and if so why does Jennifer Weiner feel the need to dox her now for supposed transgressions that occurred 35 years ago? Was Golman supposed to befriend her because they were both Jewish in a largely non-Jewish school (as per Wikipedia, Weiner has said that she was "one of only nine Jewish kids in her high school class of 400" at Simsbury High School)?

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

“It's staying home stuck in the fear bubble that makes the outside seem so scary.”

This almost entirely. And when we finally coax them out they’ll claim they were never frightened to begin with.

JackWayne said...

Fox News Viewer is only a dog whistle for lefties. I know a lot of people who don’t watch Fox and are not lefties. You wanna scare lefties with an allusion, use OAN, Citizen Free Press, Breitbart, and a half dozen others.

tim maguire said...

Sometime soon we'll finally get to see my mother-in-law, who lives a couple hours away and we haven't seen since Christmas. Her next door neighbor's family includes 3 daughters about my daughter's age and they are great friends. She, of course, hasn't seen them since Christmas except for a couple video chats. It would be nice if we could be in the same bubble so they could play while we're there, but since they have lots of local family, that seems unlikely.

Michael Ryan said...

So, is "observant" the new "kosher"?

Yancey Ward said...

Well, I would like to keep progressives informed better so that they know what places to not bother going to because they are infected by FoxNews watchers:

Any barbershop, any grocery store, any gym, any community pool, Walmarts, Costcos, Sam's Clubs, any restaurant except for those that cater solely to vegans and vegetarians, any sporting event, any concert, any play or musical, any hiking or biking trail, all national parks, all commercial flights to anywhere, every post office, every DMV, every voting location.

Also, keep in mind that any mail in ballots you receive have been licked repeatedly by FoxNews viewers- both the envelope and the ballot itself. Additionally, keep in mind that FoxNews viewers have personally spit on every single mask being produced in a factory anywhere.

Night Owl said...

Thank goodness I'm an introvert and I don't give a damn about the bubble boys and bubble girls. I hope they never leave their homes. It'll be great having clear roads and less crowded public spaces.

Yancey Ward said...

Ok, and now for places that it is safe for progressives to go because you won't find any FoxNews viewers contaminating the place:

The local landfill, the offices of the NYTimes or WaPo or MSNBC or CNN, Inga's house, Somalia, the bottom of the ocean, and Hell.

Freeman Hunt said...

My kids hang out with their friends for hours every day on opposite sides of the street. They talk, kick balls back and forth, and somehow play games.

Achilles said...

These stupid Nazis need to be defeated again.

Jim at said...

If leftists want to live an a freaking bubble for the rest of their miserable lives, that's fine by me.

In fact, I encourage it. They deserve it.

hstad said...


Blogger Quayle said..."...Imagine ostensibly intelligent and educated people making statements like that..." 5/27/20, 7:17 AM - This may be the reason - from a Liberal Rag - LOL!

Why smart people are more likely to believe fake news
“…Psychological research shows that misinformation is cleverly designed to bypass careful analytical reasoning, meaning that it can easily slip under the radar of even the most intelligent and educated people. No one is completely immune. Indeed, there is now evidence that smarter people may sometimes be even more vulnerable to certain ideas, since their greater brainpower simply allows them to rationalise their (incorrect) beliefs…” Yep, the arrogant gene!
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/apr/01/why-smart-people-are-more-likely-to-believe-fake-news


Big Mike said...

Lede paragraph on the front page of our local newspaper:

“Area overdoses and calls to suicide prevention hotlines have soared since the start of the coronavirus pandemic...”

I’m not the only commentator who warned Ken B and Ings that lives saved from coronavirus by the lockdown needed to be balanced by lives lost to opioids and suicides, but they chose to be denialists.

Lewis Wetzel said...

On the Big Island of Hawaii (population ~150,000), there are no active cases of covid-19 and there is a mandatory 14 day quarantine on all new arrivals.
The mayor says some medium-risk businesses may be allowed to reopen on June 1st, five days from now.
I want out of this asylum.

Narayanan said...

enow I say with the insanity of this madness in the name of science

"If masks work so good why didn’t they just give prisoners masks instead of release them?"

About masks, a neighbor pointed out yesterday that if a fart can pass through several layers of clothing, how good is a cloth mask at stopping anything? + virus vector is feces

do we want to contain our farts in bubble? will there then be greenhouse / global warming in the bubble which will eventually burst with earth-shattering-kaboom

Big Mike said...

Just got back from the local tailor shop. She has just been allowed to reopen but she doesn’t think she’s gonn in ng to make it. April and May were the months when proms put her enough in th black to carry her the rest of the year, and of course this year there are no proms. Also no weddings for months to come so no bridesmaid dresses. God! I hope she makes it. She’s such a nice person.

Howard said...

I just got back from the buggy-whip store. He's a really nice guy. Fortunately he is surviving because transportation is considered an essential business.

Mark said...

Being a miserable, obnoxious person is a choice, Jennifer.

Big Mike said...

@Howard, a world where you are alive and spreading your bile, while she is struggling, is a worse place than a world where you died in screaming agony but her business is thriving.

rosebud said...

Way to show that you are on the caring side, Howard.

I'm Not Sure said...

"Just got back from the local tailor shop. She has just been allowed to reopen but she doesn’t think she’s gonn in ng to make it."

The typical progressive response to a situation like this (changes forced on a business by government policies leading to the failure of the business) is that such marginal businesses shouldn't exist in the first place. What they never seem to realize is that once those businesses are gone, the ones that were a little more successful are now on the bottom of the pile, waiting to be pushed into extinction by the next government policy to come down the pike.

wbfjrr2 said...

Howard, I don’t usually respond to the likes of you, but drop dead, asshole. Die in your own vomit.

As to this bubble thing, what the fuck is it anyway? Here in Tucson we have lots of virtue signallers but I haven’t heard the bubble thing. Is that unique to liberal Jews in NYC?

I told one of my liberal retired Jewish doc friends today that he’s become a progressive cliche, after he lectured me on “”Red” people (politically) are less we’ll educated than “Blue” people. And that Trump is insane. I told him he should be insane if Trump is. He’s an orthopedic surgeon, by the way. Not a shrink.

I asked him to define better educated. He said he was trying to decide between high school graduate and college degree. I reminded him that there are way more high school degreed people than college degreed, and that many college degrees are useless these days. And that degrees have little to do with having the critical thinking skills he so sorely lacks on anything political.

Still believes Trump is a Russian tool, albeit an insane one, I guess.

ken in tx said...

I get most of my news online. But, I listen to Fox Headline News on Sirius/XM every morning at breakfast. I have never heard any of the ridiculous things that people on my Facebook feed say that Fox reports. I commented on this one time and was cautioned about admitting that I listened to Fox News. This tells me that the Fox detractors do not watch or listen to it, and are going on faith that it is bad.

Kirk Parker said...

wbfjrr2,

If Trump really were a Russian tool, Putin would be the insane one in the picture -- Trump has yet to make his first pro-Russian move.

Or maybe Putie is playing a very very looooooooooooong game, lulling everyone into complacency first. I hear he's clever that way.

Big Mike said...

This tells me that the Fox detractors do not watch or listen to it, and are going on faith that it is bad.

I suspect that this is related to Barack Obama’s open antipathy towards Fox, which alone among the major news networks declined to treat him as some form of deity.

TheThinMan said...

No wonder Democratic governors turned nursing into death camps. Thanks, Jennifer, for spilling the beans. I’ll