March 12, 2020

“I did a shopping trip yesterday and thought I was all set. Then I made the mistake of checking the news and seeing lines of people in supermarkets, and paranoia got the best of me. So, here I am again.”

Said a middle-aged woman quoted in “‘It’s hell in there:’ NYC food stores mobbed amid coronavirus fears" (NY Post).

If you're that worried, why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?

113 comments:

Shane said...

I think we all know why...

rhhardin said...

An Ohio head physician woman said it explodes logarithmically. That's where, e.g., every time you double the time you get one more case. So you can see crowding.

Tom T. said...

Presumably worried about getting food now in preparation for a time when going to the store may carry a higher risk of exposure. Not an excuse for panicking, of course.

Big Mike said...

If you're that worried, why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?

Now that is a really perceptive remark.

Mark said...


https://youtu.be/kkCwFkOZoOY

Truth.

mockturtle said...

I agree. It makes no sense at all.

roadgeek said...

And why didn't you do it months ago? My wife and I were spurred to action by the video coming out of China in January and March before it was cut off. We finished our preps early last week. We're not cloistered, as we are still going to work, but we're also prepared to treat it at home if needs be. I suspect that most people suffer from normalcy bias, and this blinkers their thinking about the future.

"Normalcy bias, or normality bias, is a tendency for people to believe that things will always function the way they normally have functioned and therefore to underestimate both the likelihood of a disaster and its possible effects. This may result in situations where people fail to adequately prepare themselves for disasters, and on a larger scale, the failure of governments to include the populace in its disaster preparations." from Wiki

Preppers, by definition, do not suffer from normalcy bias.

Bill, Republic of Texas said...

None of this makes sense to me. Why are people buying toilet paper in bulk? What is the thought process. Why bottled water. Can't you just buy a filter? A virus isn't going to make the water stop flowing unless it's end times. Then you'll need a water purifier.

Bill, Republic of Texas said...

Hey! Who's re-reading Steven King's The Stand?

gilbar said...

she's NOT worried about the virus, she's worried about the food run
since OTHER people are stocking up on food, she wants to get all she can before they run out
which they WILL do, because of people trying to get all they can before they run out

NorthOfTheOneOhOne said...

I spent the day hunting toilet paper, finally scored 3 9-roll packs of Cottonelle. Just call me Shaft, cause I'm a bad mothershutyomouth!

David Begley said...

Can someone refresh my recollection of the number of sick and dead Americans during the swine flu outbreak during the Obama Administration? Were there runs on grocery stores? Did the market crash?

Leland said...

My wife and I went shopping this morning. It was a bit funny, because it wasn't really crowded at all (helps when you go in before 8am). It actually had as many customers as usual that early. Except all of us were buying about 2 to 3 times what we normally would.

Inga said...

That’s what happens to people who have been Covid19 deniers. They are unprepared. I’ve been shopping either on line for grocery delivery or in grocery store itself little by little for over two weeks now. Every few days I’ve been getting a grocery delivery and am now stocked up for the next two months or so. No panic buying, no anxiety over not having enough groceries, household supplies and medications.

rcocean said...

Honest to God, we went to the store to get some Chicken and fresh veggies, and there were two people ahead of us with big packages of toilet papers. One had at least 64 rolls the other 128.

What the hell is it, with people and toilet paper? Do they think the paper mills are going to shut down? Do they think everyone will be put under house arrest for 6 months?

39 people have died - in a country of 320 million.

Achilles said...

If you're that worried, why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?

Because stupid sheep bleat and panic.

They don't think.

tim maguire said...

I won't need toilet paper for about month, but if I see any for sale I'll buy it anyway in case it's not available in a month when I need it.

Unknown said...

I had to get jam from the grocery store today after my workout and before dropping an Amazon return off at the UPS story - probably I picked up one of every germ.

Anyway, all the LOLs were in Publix with their re-usable bags and the gym-gals were using the public yoga mats and all I could think was: yuck^yuck, ya'll.

-XC

EAB said...

Food stores mobbed and now cleared out, And the bars are all packed.

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

My wife won’t let me stock up. I have to sneak it into the attic. How crazy is that? Not women, drugs, or gambling. Beans and Dinty Moore.

tim in vermont said...

"Hey! Who's re-reading Steven King's The Stand?”

I hated that novel. Just the way it was written. He had to fully describe and explain every fucking scene. It was like he was getting paid by the word. Editors often write “RUE” on drafts. “Resist the Urge to Explain.”

It was 40 years ago when I read it, but that novel turned me off of Stephen King.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

oops- I posted my little story in the wrong thread.

It is nutty out there. and people are idiots. One gal took the spray bottle being offered at the front of the store at NG- and sprayed it into the air, so the spray landed on others. "Oh thanks - you just sprayed me in the face." I heard one woman say.

You're supposed to spray into a paper towel and then wipe your own cart, ya freaking moron.


BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

That’s what happens to people who have been Covid19 deniers.

All that denial = stores are empty and shopped out?
Isn't that the opposite of denial?

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Yes - the TP obsession is really odd.

This virus is upper-respiratory, not lower G.I.

traditionalguy said...

In Atlanta the people must be too dumb to be afraid of the great Shut Down and the stores are still full. We figure DJT will declare a National Emergency and send the USMC out to rescue the people they are not busy arresting.

AtmoGuy said...

I'm a math and physics tutor with my own home-based business, and since most of my clients are high school students, I start my workday at 3:45 during the week. So I go to the local grocery store almost every day between 12 and 1, to get myself something for lunch and something for the family for dinner. Normally, it's not at all crowded, and there is a semi-regular customer set, i.e. the local police chief is there getting his salad from the salad bar for lunch. Today, on my regular trip, there were a bunch of middle-aged women, whom I had never seen before, buying massive amounts of boxed cereal and toilet paper. My only thought was, "Aren't those purchases working at cross purposes?"

Bill, Republic of Texas said...

I also read The Stand about 40 years ago. I remember the beginning of the book when the virus started and the population disasters. That was really good how ever went from perfectly normal to a slow slide into civilization collapse.

I don't really remember the end. I'm guessing the good guys won but I don't know for sure. Maybe I never finished the book.

traditionalguy said...

DJT is now proposing a "Travel Ban "inside the USA. Hmmm? That will take a Martial law to enforce. Hmmm? Crank up the Detention centers.

Inga said...

“That’s what happens to people who have been Covid19 deniers.”

“All that denial = stores are empty and shopped out?
Isn't that the opposite of denial?”

Some here were still in denial even two days ago, a few still are. Two weeks ago when I started stocking up, most here were in denial. I’ve finished stocking up a few days ago. No anxiety.

narciso said...

The part that doesnt make sense is all thr bodies that are laying around afte captain trips lays waste, thats not very hygenic is it.

narciso said...

Whats the logic of dumping all stock...profit.

narciso said...

In the end, the iradiated trashman delivered the nuke to las vegas, randall flags base and vaporizes them, leaving whats left of the good guys

Bill, Republic of Texas said...

So the trashman was a good guy?

Mind blown!!

narciso said...

No he was confused but he served a good purpose.

narciso said...

As i recall, they may have changed some things.

Kathryn51 said...

I live in Ground Zero (<5 miles from the nursing home). After the 1st news (over 2 weeks ago), I turned to DH and asked - are stocked up on toilet paper, Kleenex and paper towels. He assured me we were - so we didn't participate in the Costco panics. However. . . .I wish I had thought about hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes. We have some - but not enough to last a month of panic cleaning.

Today, we stopped at local Costco to get gas, pick up dog food and maybe something for dinner. Parking lot seemed more crowded than usual. Once inside, I noticed carts going by with toiler paper! (Stores was wiped out over a week ago). The word must have gotten out - folks were walking directly to the toilet paper in the back before continuing their shopping.

I feel a bit guilty, but we decided to pick up a package. After all, our illustrious Governor Jay Inslee (who should be blamed for all of the nursing home deaths since Trump is responsible for everything in the country)just closed down all of the Seattle/Tacoma/Everett school thru APRIL 24TH!

Oh, and apparently if you are over 60, you are supposed to shelter in place. Pffffttt - that's not gonna happen.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Russia Russia Inga- no one denies the virus exists. No one denies the virus is bad, like past viruses.
Some of us question the validity of the panic.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Russia Russia Inga- once again missing the point. The shopping anxiety isn't from the virus, it's from the hoarding.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Ann said:

If you're that worried, why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?

I didn't think I would be worried, but I was worried pushing a cart around busy zombie Costco. People gross me out.
I am paranoid and grossed out by people on most days, now it's worse.
I could smell some old guys breathe and I thought 'eww- he has Covid-19 breath and it touched my eyeballs.'

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

I'm taking Ann's advise and shopping on-line.
No more costco for me.
Plus - Inga did all her smart shopping ahead of time.

Inga said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Inga said...

“... no one denies the virus exists. No one denies the virus is bad, like past viruses. Some of us question the validity of the panic.”

Many of you here denied that this virus was more deadly than seasonal flu. Many of you here denied that it would spread as we’ve now seen spread. If you and others had taken this more seriously two weeks go you wouldn’t now be contributing to panic buying. My shopping is over and I’m shaking my head at those who are now just realizing they might need to stock up. Oh and I’m not hoarding anything, not by a long shot. I did buy 5 lbs of rice and three pounds of beans. If I don’t use them when this is all over, I’ll donate them

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Russia Russia Inga. so far, covid 19 remains less deadly than season flu. Right now, that is a fact. A fact that might well change rapidly, but it's still a fact.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

I'm not accusing you of hoarding Inga.
I'm giving you credit for shopping before the hoarding started. yay you.

Inga said...

Bleach Brain Bimbo,

Still in denial, have fun stocking up on groceries among the panicked shoppers. LOL at you. You do realize that even if you’re ordering grocery delivery they are running low or out of certain items, don’t you?

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

I'm fine, actually. Merely acknowledging that Ann's idea is a good one.
You're gonna run out of rice and beans soon enough. The end is near, Russia Russia Inga.

Francisco D said...

Russia Russia Inga- once again missing the point. The shopping anxiety isn't from the virus, it's from the hoarding.

Well, doesn't Inga always miss the point, by a country mile?

I agree about the hoarding competition. The other concern is that stores will close because of the virus. I suspect that young people (who appear to be unaffected by the virus) will staff those stores.

Inga said...

“You're gonna run out of rice and beans soon enough.”

Bleach Brain,
Not hardly. I doubt I will even touch them. I’ve got plenty of canned foods, dry foods, my freezer is packed full of meat and veggies, I have 20 pounds of flour and know how to bake bread, and have several loaves in the freezer already I have really delicious Peak full fat dry milk, plus I froze a few gallons of regular milk. How are you prepared?

Inga said...

“The other concern is that stores will close because of the virus.”

Well DUH. Also what happens when there aren’t delivery people who are willing to deliver, or they jack up the price of delivery because there are so few willing to venture out? You people really are so unprepared.

FullMoon said...

Still waiting for the link..Ingeberg

tommyesq said...

David Begley, according to the CDC, swine flu entered the US from Mexico in spring 2009, and by March 2010 had been contracted by 59 million Americans with 265,000 hospitalized and 12,000 dead. So a 0.02% fatality rate and a 0.45% hospitalization rate. Right now this looks like best case numbers for coronavirus, at least as to the death and hospitalization rates.

First US case in March, cases in all 50 states by May, about 25,000 cases by mid June, surpassing all other countries, with CDC estimating there were actually 1,000,000 undiagnosed. Obama did not declare it a National emergency until late October, at around 4000 deaths and an estimated 22 million infections. A month later there were an estimated 50 million infections and 10,000 deaths, at which point a vaccine became available. Test kits were availble in limited numbers and only became available in all 50 states in May.

tommyesq said...

Also, I drove 120 miles from my home outside of Boston today before I found a store with toilet paper, and then the total amount available was only about 50 rolls.

Inga said...

“Also, I drove 120 miles from my home outside of Boston today before I found a store with toilet paper, and then the total amount available was only about 50 rolls.”

Wow, so glad I was able to get the brand I like. I checked to see if the grocery store I order from still has it and no they don't, all out. Luckily over the last two weeks I stocked up.

wildswan said...

The flu was dying off anyhow as the spring sun's UV rays killed viruses by the billions but then the Israelis found the vaccine. The panic-pandemic died away as fast and as strangely as it came. Nobody had admitted they were hoarding T.P. so no one could ask how others were getting rid of the surplus. Food pantries reported donations up by 4000%, "but it's all toilet paper when it isn't pinto beans."

MikeR said...

"why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?" Exactly. Our local stores have started delivering, mostly for free. They want to keep business once people are quarantined!

wildswan said...

"tommyesq said...
David Begley, according to the CDC, swine flu entered the US from Mexico in spring 2009, and by March 2010 had been contracted by 59 million Americans with 265,000 hospitalized and 12,000 dead."

That's pretty amazing because this year's regular flu has had so far 280,000 hospitalizations and 16,000 dead. Yet no one is paying any attention - although the hospital people say they are stretched.

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

“In Atlanta the people must be too dumb to be afraid of the great Shut Down and the stores are still full. We figure DJT will declare a National Emergency and send the USMC out to rescue the people they are not busy arresting.”

Not any noticeable panic in my part of Washington State. Interestingly, these days it seems to be the young and the Deplorable who still feel that any display of panic dishonors one. You can decry their lack of preparedness, but it isn’t hard to identify who will seek community in crisis and who will huddle in their houses slurping ramen.

wildswan said...

I just found out that right in the middle of a giant forest in Canada but next to the Bay of Fundy is a huge toilet paper plant. It runs on energy from the 40-foot tidal race in the Bay of Fundy so it can go on cutting down trees from the giant forest and producing toilet paper, no matter what. We'll never run out of toilet paper unless we anger the Canadians. Pass it on.

Inga said...

“The flu was dying off anyhow as the spring sun's UV rays killed viruses by the billions...”

Lots of Covid cases in Qatar. Looks like sunshine and warm weather hasn’t affected the spread.

Oso Negro said...

I am not worried about the flu itself - I am worried about the shock to the nation's supply chains and critical industries from unintended consequences of panic and closures. Here in Galveston, it was pretty much like a pre-hurricane event. An amazing number of our citizens went for frozen pizza. Who knew that was such a staple?

chickelit said...

Lots of Covid cases in Qatar. Looks like sunshine and warm weather hasn’t affected the spread.

Isn't that the place with the indoor snow skiing hill? Qatari's live mostly indoors because of the weather -- that's bad for people and great for viruses.

chickelit said...

Food pantries reported donations up by 4000%, "but it's all toilet paper when it isn't pinto beans."

My local Trader Joe's was sold out of every type of canned bean today. There must be a direct, unspoken connection between bean consumption and TP usage.

NorthOfTheOneOhOne said...

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

You can decry their lack of preparedness, but it isn’t hard to identify who will seek community in crisis and who will huddle in their houses slurping ramen.

My local Fry's Foods is wiped out as far as the chicken flavored ramen goes, but not the beef. Sign of the apocalypse?

MSG said...

Bill, Republic of Texas --
Yes, the good guys win and take over a town to live in. They even activate the power station and get electricity running again. But Stephen King does not explain how they expected to supply the power station with fuel.

I went into the local Manhattan Fairway supermarket to buy a few normal items. When I was inside I saw that the checkout lines were four or five times longer than they ever had been, snaking around to other side of the store. And what I wanted most to buy -- Napa cabbage -- was gone. So I walked out.

I had no idea why this was happening and didn't find out that it was a citywide phenomenon until I saw this item here at the Althouse blog. Who told everyone else to panic today? Why didn't I get the memo?

cubanbob said...

Hasn't anyone here ever heard of Instacart? Uber Eats or Grubhub? You don't have to go shopping or go to restaurants.

cubanbob said...

For all of the old farts here (and that includes me) make sure you are up to date with the latest pneumonia vaccine. In of itself it does nothing for the corona or any other virus but if one gets sick with a respiratory tract virus and are old and have the usual old age afflictions you are far more likely to get a bacterial infection from the inflammation and fluid retention in your lungs from the virus. That is what will kill you.

Francisco D said...

Inga wrote: You people really are so unprepared.

Well, how many rolls of TP are in your house right now? And how many cans of beans?

The two may be related.

MadisonMan said...

I have really delicious Peak full fat dry milk
I have Anchor brand. Really nice.

roadgeek said...

"...But Stephen King does not explain how they expected to supply the power station with fuel...."

The fuel issue was never fully discussed, but I gathered the power station was hydroelectric.

We have 12 large packages of toilet paper in the garage. It's not that we're concerned that toilet paper is going to vanish from the face of the earth; we're more concerned about a lock-down preventing us from going to the grocery store, and 12 packages negates the need to go out at all.

Lewis Wetzel said...

There is an old time radio show called "Escape." In the 50s they did a radio-play version of George Stewart's 1949 novel Earth Abides. It is an apocalyptic novel about a man who survives a plague that kills off nearly everyone in the world. Pockets of survivors compete with each other for resources. The plucky protagonist forges a community by emphasizing mutual dependence.
In the radio play, about a year or so after the apocalypse, the taps run dry. No more county water.
This is unbelievable. There is a deep infrastructure that provides pure, pressurized water to your tap. If civilization collapsed -- if the people who manage & maintain the system that delivers water to your home vanished -- it would be a matter or hours or days, not months, before your taps ran dry.

Narayanan said...

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...
Yes - the TP obsession is really odd.

This virus is upper-respiratory, not lower G.I.
______&&&&&&
Are stores out of Kleenex at all?
Repurpose TP!?

Narayanan said...

Blogger cubanbob said...
Hasn't anyone here ever heard of Instacart? Uber Eats or Grubhub? You don't have to go shopping or go to restaurants.
_____&&&&&&
Italy patient zero ---
Food delivery guy.
Chinese food.

exiledonmainstreet, green-eyed devil said...

Inga said...
“That’s what happens to people who have been Covid19 deniers.”

Deniers? In NYC? Isn't that solid Dem territory?

You're a dumbass.

exiledonmainstreet, green-eyed devil said...

I went to Costco last week to stock up on the bulk items I normally buy on a monthly basis - including TP. No TP panic here. We have a Brita filter so no water worries either.

Kevin said...

In leftist-run countries it’s always time to stock up on toilet paper.

stevew said...

"If you're that worried, why aren't you worried about crowding into a store?"

People in an irrational state of mind do irrational things. Quickly. Now.

MIL, 89 yrs old, living in FL, left a vmail for mrs. stevew. Her voice sounded raspy. Now we're worried, likely irrationally.

Aunty: I too read The Stand about 40 years ago and was turned off for the same reason you were. His books all seem to have that flow - unlike you I've read a few more since - exciting start, long boring expositional section, denouement and conclusion. Tedious reading. I find my mind wandering in the middle.

rhhardin said...

Armstrong and Getty recommend instead of shaking hands or fist bumping, just flip the guy off at a distance. That contributes to social distancing.

h said...

In the past week, I've shopped at costco, Lidl (cut rate European chain), local independent Hispanic grocer: I've never seen crowds, nor shortages. Except for small bags of plain rice -- yes on small bags of jasmine rice, yes on larger bags of plain rice. Maybe NYC residents are more prone to panic?

Fernandistein said...

As usual I worry about the fake news, which this article is.

MSM dweebs Reuven Fenton, Khristina Narizhnaya and Jorge Fitz-Gibbon used plenty of scary words, including

"hell", "mobbed", "panic-buying", "fever", "mobs" "freaked-out" "frantically" "any remaining supplies"

to describe people calmly standing in lines with plenty of "stuff" visible on the shelves behind them.

"It’s hell in there", ... people are lined up all the way to the opposite wall."

A long line = Hell.

stevew said...

Mrs. stevew went to the grocery store yesterday, a local chain, Market Basket, and ran into a situation with a lot of people. A blizzard forecast sized crowd. She reports extreme shortages of toilet paper and bottled water. Everything else was readily available. Checkout line was quite long, didn't resemble HELL at all (not that she's been there). One interesting observation: average age of the patrons appeared to be well above 60. It was late morning.

gilbar said...

let's try some math!
one roll of toilet paper is about enough, to last one person; what one month?
The average household size in america is about 2.52*
Let's round up, to three rolls per household per month
64 rolls/3 rolls/month gives MORE than 21 months worth of toilet paper for an average household
21 months is Nearly TWO YEARS
Igna? Please tell me, AGAIN, WHY people are buying 128 roll packages of toilet paper?


about 2.52* see how i went to 3 significant digits for my approximation? that makes it sound accurate

stevew said...

Meanwhile, Dunkin is running free donut Friday today! Buy a coffee, get a donut. People suck but some suck less than others.

Gusty Winds said...

I'm not even worried. I'm sure the Costco in Pewaukee, WI will have plenty of everything as usual. The Piggly Wiggly in Sussex, WI is fine. And they've got the coldest beer cooler in town.

Plus, I live in Waukesha County, WI. We tend to live with our heads outside of our asses.

I recommend frequent your local tavern.

Gusty Winds said...

NYC elected AOC, correct? I'm not sure there is a lot of critical thinking going on in Brooklyn.

Jamie said...

We're traveling for our kids' spring break, visiting friends, so basically whatever preparations I had in place before leaving home might be all we get done. Fortunately I've always been a "keep lots of back stock" person and my freezers are full... but my kids probably won't like a lot of what I give them to eat if there stores in my area shut down for a while. They're not fans of red beans and rice, for instance.

Thanks for the tip on full-fat dried milk, Inga et al. - I've only ever bought fat-free for use in a few recipes.

daskol said...

For anyone not already on high alert because of exposure to someone at work or in church, shit just got real in NYC last couple of days. They're still debating closing public schools, but many private schools are quietly closing up shop starting next week. This gives many schools a month off in that Spring Break, which for many NYC schools coincides with Passover, is in a little more than two weeks. So closing next Monday for two weeks gives kids a month out of school. My kids have been home since Tuesday when we learned that someone at my wife's work was admitted to the hospital, and then Wednesday we learned that person tested positive. So, social distancing came early to our house, since late last week for the most part. If whatever sniffles and aches/pains we had last week, it was just we two adults who got it, not any of the kids cooped up with us, and it was very mild. The toilet paper thing may be weird, but I've always kept a ton of paper towels, toilet paper and ziplocks in the basement. Now there's a lot more food down there too, as we did our prep online a couple weeks ago. You can never have too much ghee, and for when the ghee runs out, there's powdered butter and heavy cream for your popcorn or coffee needs. At least the telecoms infrastructure in NYC has held up thus far, but the next couple of weeks are going to be interesting in that regard as many offices are announcing closings starting next week.

daskol said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
daskol said...

If Amazon Prime WholeFoods grocery delivery shuts down, people may panic. I can't imagine why anyone would go to a physical store right now. Food, booze, drugs of legal and illegal variety are all more conveniently available for delivery in most areas here than anywhere else in the country.

Gusty Winds said...

Do you think they have toilet paper at the unregulated outdoor wet market in Wuhan?

Fernandistein said...

"The Stand" is about standing in a long line, which is Hell.

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

Video: How the coronavirus is different from other pandemics

Ray said...

"I went to Costco for a gross of toilet paper and all I got was this damn Corona Virus."

JPS said...

Here in northern Italy - outside of the worst-hit areas, but definitely affected - only three customers are allowed into our nearest grocery store at a time, and the clerks wear PPE. Other customers are to line up outside, at least a meter apart. Of course droplets can travel that far, but the odds are lower.

I'm hoping all this has a salutary second-order effect on Italian line etiquette, as people realize they get there at the same time whether they string the line out and wait their damn turn, or pile up in the usual crush. Sorry: I love this place, I married into it, but there are rules for lines, and waiting in what Italians call a line brings out my inner Walter Sobchak.

daskol said...

So is only one kiss on the cheek social distancing in Italy?

JPS said...

Daskol,

Heh. No, I think they started by kissing only close acquaintances, still on both cheeks, in the spirit of, If you got it I'm probably getting it anyway.

But the restrictions have gone well beyond that. A couple of days ago you could just go out and walk, just keep your distance and be smart. Now we're not allowed out of the house except to buy food or medicine (one person goes per family), or for other enumerated urgent reasons.

At first the compliance was voluntary and the police would probably tell you off and send you on your way. (Most people are staying in by choice when possible.) I've read they're considering fines and jail time.

I'm delighted to say if you have dogs, you're allowed to take them out for walks, no questions asked. But I can't take my kids out for a nice long walk to ward off cabin fever....

Leland said...

I made it back with a case of Corona. Now I'm ready for the next two weekends.

daskol said...

Good luck, that lockdown sounds intense. I hope we don't have to get that drastic here in NYC. We haven't left the house except for the backyard in about a week, voluntarily, because of our exposure to a positive case at work.

daskol said...

So a mini baby boom in about 9 months or so?

Todd said...

Inga said...
That’s what happens to people who have been Covid19 deniers. They are unprepared. I’ve been shopping either on line for grocery delivery or in grocery store itself little by little for over two weeks now. Every few days I’ve been getting a grocery delivery and am now stocked up for the next two months or so. No panic buying, no anxiety over not having enough groceries, household supplies and medications.

3/12/20, 8:00 PM


LOL! You were ALSO unprepared. You just started a little before most of the other "unprepared". If you were actually prepared, you would not have "started a little over two weeks ago". You should have already had that level of stockage in case of ANY emergency. Not necessarily two month but at least two weeks and up to a month or so if you have the space.

All those "preppers" don't look so silly now, do they?

Basil Duke said...

This morning, my local grocery store was entirely out of toilet paper, but still had plenty of Bounty. Folks apparently have not yet grasped the fact that a bottom can easily be wiped with a paper towel. (I live in the St. Louis region.) Canned goods were also present in abundance. I've always maintained an emergency supply of food - MREs of every variety available, along with canned corned beef (massive concentration of protein in those blocks of pressed bovine flesh), canned chili, sardines, canned hams, canned beans, dried soups, etc., - so I'm not getting all freaky deeky. However, I DID pick up a few items to supplement my SHTF stash, just as I've been incrementally doing for the last few weeks. In regard to TP, barring an outbreak of Cholera in our house, we're good for about two months. It's also important to have a container or two of salt, garlic powder, onion powder, etc. on hand for seasoning purposes. I always keep about a dozen cans of sterno in the calamity room (where my emergency "stuff" is cached), in the event of a power outage, for, obviously, food-heating/coffee percolating purposes.

MayBee said...

I have no idea how coronavirus is going to turn out, and neither does anyone here.

But it does seem our society has taken a turn where there is no group downside to over reaction. So people who own small businesses or people who rely on tips aren't going to make their money? So what? We are going on lockdown because then the people at the top can crow about doing something. There are too many benefits to get people to worry and panic.

Caligula said...

"We don’t even know what to stock up on.” I noticed the vitamin C supplements have been stripped from shelves everywhere and assumed someone (who knows why) figured it must be a preventative against this virus. As no doubt there are millions who remain convinced that megadose vitamin C reduces the risk of getting a cold, although this has been thoroughly tested and found not to be so.

I suppose those buying the vitamin C probably didn't pause to think that the ascorbic acid in it probably came from China ...

Panic doesn't usually bring out the best in people, does it? And it surely has a negative effect on usable intelligence.

MayBee said...

LOL! You were ALSO unprepared. You just started a little before most of the other "unprepared".

That's true. People who live where there can be hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, snow storms, rain storms, wind storms, or disease outbreaks should have supplies on hand. If power goes out or a gas line breaks or the plows don't come, you are going to have to eat- even if it's just granola bars for a few days.

None of us are perfect and most of us don't always have what we need, but just two weeks ago getting food when you live in a snow area isn't really something to look down on others about.

gilbar said...

igna said,,,
Lots of Covid cases in Qatar. Looks like sunshine and warm weather hasn’t affected the spread


hmmm.... LOTS! says igna. As Al Smith would say; let's take a look at the record
262 cases, no deaths; as of Yesterday

out of a population of 2,641,669 that comes to LESS THAN 1 person out of every 10,000
which would mean 35,000 people here; out of our population of 350,000,000
NOT 35,000 deaths; 35,000 people across the country testing positive

let's see what Qatar's DEATH RATE would be like here
hmmm
Qatar has NO DEATHS. We have a population about 150 times bigger;
so, that'd mean IF we had the same death rate as Qatar, ours would be 150 X 0
which equals ZERO

i know, igna
Math is HARD!

Todd said...

Basil Duke said...

However, I DID pick up a few items to supplement my SHTF stash, just as I've been incrementally doing for the last few weeks.

3/13/20, 9:45 AM


Yep, general preparedness is always a good thing. Due to where we live in Florida, we have all the basic emergency supplies so that we can survive weeks without power (and have had too). Have at least two alternate ways to cook, have water stored and water filters, canned and freeze dried foods, etc.

One of the last "prep" things I did was replace the digital lock on the safe with a digital/manual lock so I could get in if the electronics go bad. Was practically a drop-in change out and was not too expensive.

I have repeatedly read that one of the best "prep" strategies is to plan for a zombie apocalypses because then you wind up covering most types of emergencies/disasters instead of focusing on only one type (like hurricane or bio or civil unrest, etc.). Plan often, plan early...

JPS said...

Daskol, 9:30:

Thanks, I appreciate it. Funny though it sounds, life other than all that feels nearly normal and non-disastrous. We still have necessities and those around me are fine. Boredom and confinement are the main aches so far.

I hope too that it won't get drastic for you. I catch myself thinking hopefully that our population density's one fifth of Italy's, which has to help; then I remind myself that the cities are more or less comparable. I think people being smart, voluntarily, like you and yours, will whittle away at the dread exponent. I hope it's enough, and there are enough like you, for a different trajectory.

MayBee, 9:49:

"But it does seem our society has taken a turn where there is no group downside to over reaction."

Isn't that the truth? But whether you're panicking or getting intelligently concerned while there's still time for it to matter depends a lot on your analysis.

"We are going on lockdown because then the people at the top can crow about doing something."

An epidemiologist friend wrote, "I also anticipate continued political action of mixed usefulness, resulting from the politician's bias for action."

BleachBit-and-Hammers said...

"the fact that a bottom can easily be wiped with a paper towel. "


well yes. BUT a paper towel is not engineered to dissolve/disintegrate in a septic system or the municipal sewer system.

exiledonmainstreet, green-eyed devil said...

Gusty Winds:

"Plus, I live in Waukesha County, WI. We tend to live with our heads outside of our asses."

True as well of Ozaukee County. However, there are exceptions. Inga lives in Waukesha County.

JPS said...

gilbar, 9:59:

"Qatar has NO DEATHS."

Careful there. They report No Data, which could be zero or it could be more than they've yet released.

Then there's Germany, with 3,059 confirmed cases and 6 deaths. Only one in 500? Great! (Tragic for that one, of course, but a relief in the bigger picture.) Except - since the huge majority of those who die were already weakened by something else, the German health authorities are being systematically meticulous to discern whether it was, say, COVID-19 or the cancer that killed that poor cancer patient with COVID-19. Those 6 are basically the ones they're already sure could only have been killed by complications resulting directly from the virus.

And I'm not suggesting they're trying to mislead, just that while they're no doubt trying to be careful, there might be some temptation to interpret the numbers in a way that happens to make their response look more effective.

TheOne Who Is Not Obeyed said...

It's all pretty simple - all of the "social distancing", school closures, cancellations, etc. are to protect the population of higher-risk individuals. We are all going through this Panic Theater because said high-risk individuals won't self-isolate. The one thing that would be most effective at preventing the increase of deaths is that limited self-isolation.

This is exactly what medical facilities and care facilities are doing: They are isolating their vulnerable populations by preventing anyone from visiting unless going through strict protocols. At-risk individuals should be doing this of their own accord.

Instead, we get "pfft. That ain't gonna happen."

When all of the Panic Theater is over, we'll go about our business but the virus will still be around and spreading. Eventually damn near all of us will have it, just like we get colds and other viruses. The elderly and infirm will die from COVID-19, but it will be spread out. We could do that now, but because these selfish gits don't want to do the right thing, the rest of us have to participate in a media-driven economic crash test.

FullMoon said...

HT Instapundit:
After problems arose with the C.D.C.’s test, officials could have switched to using successful tests that other countries were already using. But the officials refused to do so, essentially because it would have required changing bureaucratic procedures.

The federal government could also have eased regulations on American hospitals and laboratories, to allow them to create and manufacture their own tests, as Melissa Miller of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine told The Washington Post. But federal officials did not do so for weeks.

On Facebook, Virginia Postrel observes, “The people who screwed this up weren’t Trumpites. They were the pros.”
Why Have So Few Americans Been Tested for Coronavirus?

FullMoon said...

Ya know what would be great? If the internet went down and power went out..

Lock and load, am I right?

EsoxLucius said...

You know, everything doesn't have to be about Trump. There is so much blame and unluckiness involved that everyone is partially at fault. Watching both to get the whole story, I feel that the right wing media is jacking up the concern more than the left, and the president's repeated falsehoods aren't helping. We all know what to do: show compassion, be patient, and above all, wash your hands.