October 30, 2019

Cute and fun-loving but connected to Trump, so it must go to hell.


Seems mildly nice, but here's where it goes — reported by The Daily Mail — "Even Presidential plane food is bad! Photo of a deeply unappetizing-looking dish served on Donald Trump's Air Force One goes viral/A photo of a meal served to journalists travelling on Air Force One has gone viral/Snap shows an innocuous stuffed bell pepper with a Halloween face - but it is the unidentified object on a side-plate behind it that has caused a storm/Beige-looking dish has sparked jokes galore, with some suggesting the President himself would not eat it."

ADDED: I think the journalist who took the picture was experiencing it as cute and fun, but by tweeting it, she gave the tweetosphere something to shit on, so, of course, they did.

The item in the background is something to puzzle over. If you decide it's meat, it seems gross and it's the main course so if you don't eat it you're deprived. If you decide it's a glazed pastry, it's just at worst a caloric dessert that's easy to pass up and no loss at all.

IN THE COMMENTS: Big Mike said:
I ate worse-looking than that when I was in the army! You should see what chipped beef on toast looks like at 0 dark thirty!
I said:
My parents — who met in the Army in WW2 — often served us chipped beef on toast for dinner back in the 1950s and 60s. We loved it! If you know how to make white sauce properly and you can get that chipped beef that used to come in a little jar with a pry-off lid and you toast up just normal white bread, it's excellent!
AND: As long as we're talking about chipped beef on toast, here are the 3 Stooges in "Of Cash and Hash." Go to 4:26 to skip the set-up and focus on the food. Larry is serving a customer at a diner:

CUSTOMER: I’ll have a cream chip beef on toast.

LARRY: Right. Say, let me give you a tip, pal. Our fried eggs are out of this world.

CUSTOMER: Could be, but I want cream chip beef on toast…

LARRY: Anything you say, but you’re crazy if you don’t order the fried eggs!

CUSTOMER: [grabbing Larry and yelling at him] I want cream chip beef on toast!

LARRY: Alright, the customer’s always right! [Then, at the window to the kitchen:] Ordering - two fried eggs over easy! Ha ha— [A dish thrown by the customer hits Larry in the head.] Hey, mister, don’t go away — Never mind, I’ll eat it myself! [Back at the window to the kitchen:] On those two fried eggs over easy - use the fresh ones this time!

156 comments:

MayBee said...

It looks like a glazed scone to me.

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

That’s a chicken thigh, not chilled monkey brains, and I’m sorry our intellectual betters at the Daily Mail did not recognize it.

MadisonMan said...

Who doesn't love frosted scones for dessert?

rhhardin said...

If they're journalists, add a toy.

wendybar said...

He is making fun of them calling him ORANGE MAN....Get it???? What a funny president we have. He has the BEST sense of humor...it goes over their heads!!!

Birches said...

Looks like a turnover to me...

rehajm said...

It's a fritter you black pudding eating wankers...

MadisonMan said...

Or maybe it's an apple turnover. Either way, scrumptious.

pacwest said...

We did the PepperO'Lantern thing last night. Looks like some sort of glazed cobbler thing for dessert. Let the man eat in peace.

Laslo Spatula said...

Orange Pepper Bad.

I am Laslo.

Jersey Fled said...

Looks like a nice salad with a pork chop on the side for the non-vegans, if there are any in the press corp (pronounced "core").

NickLevi86 said...

I suspect these ingrates did not even have to pay for this food. The "beige mystery" seems to be a glazed scone of some sort: a simple desert item. These brats do not deserve desert.

The only thing I'm remotely sympathetic for is the weird face. I do not want my food looking at me, unless they are those smiley-fries which are awesome. Not that I'd expect these snobs to appreciate smiley-fries either.

gspencer said...

Looks like a scone covered with a sweet glazing. You see them in Panera all the time.

And why are "journalists" (Walter Winchell is long dead) on that plane to begin with?

And they get lunch to boot?

tim in vermont said...

If they feel so ill used, and life is so hard for them, they should resign.

AlbertAnonymous said...

Don’t eat it. More for me. Looks like it’d be real good with my coffee.

tim in vermont said...

These journalists are serious people, I mean look at this tweet from a WaPo writer!

My @WashingtonPost piece on why the very broadness of the First Amendment suggests we should have a hate speech law. And if we did, why the President might be in violation of it.

Not a cult! Nooooo!

henry said...

Complaining about free food. Ingrates.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Geeze these people who criticize everything Trump need to get a life.

Stuffed yellow bell pepper with what seems to be a nicely done apple turnover or perhaps phyllo wrapped instead of pie crust..topped with powdered sugar icing.

Can't tell what the pepper is stuffed with, but my choice would be Italian sausage with and herb seasoned bread crumb base and perhaps some cheeses like a Parmesan Asseago blend.

Get a life people.

Plus the Orange bell pepper is a good touch since it isn't only Halloween with orange pumpkins....it is an ironic twist on Orange Man Bad. I bet the staff and Trump are laughing now :-)

I am.

Can Of Cheese for Hunter said...

why are journalists on the plane being servered ANYTHING?

Big Mike said...

I ate worse-looking than that when I was in the army! You should see what chipped beef on toast looks like at 0 dark thirty!

Can Of Cheese for Hunter said...

what a pack of pansy ass whiners. they are flying on air force one.
The thing on the plate is probably an apple fritter.

F the press. Why are they allowed on Air Force One at all?

Doug said...

And were this served on zerobama's press plane, it would make the style sections of the NYT, WaPoo, and LA Times with plaudits all around.

Ann Althouse said...

"My @WashingtonPost piece on why the very broadness of the First Amendment suggests we should have a hate speech law. And if we did, why the President might be in violation of it."

I read that yesterday and decided against blogging it because it was such crap, I felt like I would be succumbing to bait if I took the time to trash it. I saw that the commenters at WaPo were already trashing it and supporting the First Amendment. That's the good news.

Ann Althouse said...

"I ate worse-looking than that when I was in the army! You should see what chipped beef on toast looks like at 0 dark thirty!"

My parents — who met in the Army in WW2 — often served us chipped beef on toast for dinner back in the 1950s and 60s. We loved it! If you know how to make white sauce properly and you can get that chipped beef that used to come in a little jar with a pry-off lid and you toast up just normal white bread, it's excellent!

tim in vermont said...

It’s still sad to see a once great newspaper like the Washington Post turned into worse than Breitbart.

tim in vermont said...

"often served us chipped beef on toast “

My dad said that was known in the Army as “shit on a shingle."

tim maguire said...

My uncle used to serve chipped beef for breakfast. Just about the most unhealthy thing I've eaten in my life, but delicious.

etbass said...

SOS. Never heard it described as "excellent."

Big Mike said...

@Althouse, not complaining about the taste of chipped beef on toast. But how it looks in the early morning! Yuck! Much prefer pancakes and bacon and coffee, thick and black.

Bob Boyd said...

Adderall is an appetite suppressant.

gilbar said...

Our Beloved Professor Althouse said..
often served us chipped beef on toast for dinner back in the 1950s and 60s. We loved it!


My mom used to make us this too, and also loved it. She'd use toasted english muffins for the toast
One day, while we were eating it; i asked why they called it such bad words in the army?
And my dad (US 3rd Infantry Div, North Korea '52-'53) said;
"your mom cooks it better than they did"

Big Mike said...

My @WashingtonPost piece on why the very broadness of the First Amendment suggests we should have a hate speech law.

I think that’s a really good idea!

But as President of the United States, Donald Trump gets to decide what constitutes “hate speech.”

cacimbo said...

Peppers are usually stuffed with meat so the smaller plate contains dessert. To me it looks like bread pudding with sauce.

Hagar said...

Your mother probably made nice spaghetti and meatballs too, but you did not have to eat it twice a week in an Army messhall.
I still refuse to eat either that or SOS under any circumstances whatever!

Beasts of England said...

Tell the White House press corps that we’re serving a delightful Chateaubriand this week on Air Pinochet. Our dessert is a special surprise. Enjoy your time in the air!!

Dust Bunny Queen said...

My parents — who met in the Army in WW2 — often served us chipped beef on toast for dinner back in the 1950s and 60s. We loved it!

Ah yes! The comfort food of childhood made by parents who were raised by their parents who survived the Great Depression and needed to eat frugally. Cheap, easy, filling and tasty.

Our favorites were creamed tuna on toast. And also creamed hard boiled eggs on toast. Today I jazz it up by adding a bit more spices, curry powder to the eggs. Maybe some peas, green onions or chopped cooked asparagus or other vegetables to the tuna and put it into puff pastry shells.

My husband never had these things before and was really sceptical when I first made creamed tuna. He loves it.

CWJ said...

Althouse. I Love cream chipped beef. Same childhood experience as you.

I was in Ocean City, MD this summer, and ordered a chopped beef omelet at Malia's. I had never seen one offered before, and assumed it was like any other, but with chipped beef meat rather than bacon or ham. No, it was full cream chipped beef inside, and it was wonderful.

Infinite Monkeys said...

That's better than any meals I've had on airplanes in decades. I haven't had a decent meal on an airplane since the '70s and this still looks better than what I had.

cacimbo said...

This also makes me wonder why we need "journolists" on the plane with the President. Let them meet the President when he lands. Lots of these traditions are ridiculous in the modern age.

Robert Cook said...

"You should see what chipped beef on toast looks like at 0 dark thirty!"

My dad first ate chipped beef on toast ("shit on a shingle", as Skylark and etbass mentioned above) in the Navy, and he loved for the rest of his life. My mother occasionally made it for the family, and I liked it pretty well.

alanc709 said...

Breakfast in our house would have been hash brown potatoes and sausage gravy. A different form of SOS.

Amadeus 48 said...

We used to have chipped beef on toast at home. It was good, but it didn't look like much. Points to both Althouse and Big Mike.

Gahrie said...

SOS was always my favorite meal when Dad took us to the dining hall, and it was one of the first things I learned to cook from scratch. But SOS is made with ground beef, not chipped beef, and each service has its own recipe.

Tommy Duncan said...

Liberals suck the joy out of life.

Ann Althouse said...

"My dad said that was known in the Army as “shit on a shingle.""

You cannot mention this dish without someone saying that. Thanks for yielding to the irresistible cue. Could it not happen that someone could express a fondness for this food without getting it shit on? I think not. I have seen this happen every single time for my entire life and I'm talking about 60+ years of experience. How is it possible that joke, which is older than I am, is still something that people feel compelled to retell?!

From the Wikipedia article "Chipped beef":

"Chipped beef on toast (S.O.S.) is the title of a book of military humor. In his World War II book Band of Brothers, Stephen E. Ambrose evokes the military basics: 'At the end of May, the men of Easy packed up their barracks bags and … [took] a stop-and-go train ride to Sturgis, Kentucky. At the depot Red Cross girls had coffee and doughnuts for them, the last bit of comfort they would know for a month. They marched out to the countryside and pitched up tents, dug straddle trenches for latrines, and ate the Army's favorite meal for troops in the field, creamed chipped beef on toast, universally known as SOS, or Shit on a Shingle.'"

Big Mike said...

Never heard it described as "excellent."

If you feel your arteries hardening as you eat it, then the White gravy is just right.

chuck said...

I also liked chipped beef on toast when I was a kid. Yum, yum.

Can Of Cheese for Hunter said...

There should be a decoy air force one - a 737 max. Just for WaPo a-holes.

tim in vermont said...

Sprry... It’s a childhood memory.

tim in vermont said...

Memory of my dad.

Robert Cook said...

...and I fell right in line. Perhaps because there is an assumption that people don't know the vulgar name for chipped beef on toast. Heck, I'd bet today that few people even know WTF "chipped beef on toast" is!

Big Mike said...

You cannot mention this dish without someone saying that.

And you never will be able to mention it without someone saying that. Maybe you grew up eating chipped beef on toast, but for most of us the first time you see it on your breakfast plate is a ghastly experience.

Fernandinande said...

"Of Cash and Hash" is the one what learned me how to cook.

Rick said...

So the chef has his work shit on because those who care about the working man need to express their hatred and don't care about him or reality.

What a lovely group of people.

Tommy Duncan said...

Blogger etbass said...

SOS. Never heard it described as "excellent."

You never ate my mother's version with a German origin white sauce.

Bob Boyd said...

Looks like a glazed cofeve made with Bigly apples.

J said...

SOS served with two sunny side up.Bacon on the side .Or as I call it the Army's eggs benedict.

Rich, NYC said...

I was introduced to creamed chipped beef on toast in the military in the 1960s. Loved it then; still eat it now. I keep a package or two of store bought creamed chipped beef in the freezer for times when I'm too lazy to make my own. Not bad, but home made is much better.

Mikec said...

It obviously apple pie. The photo show the crust side of the slice toward at the camera. Don't people in Madison eat apple pie anymore? And why would anyone think that Air Force one would serve a scone or apple turnover for dessert!

traditionalguy said...

It's a cornish game hen. You can roast a dozen at the same time. And there is no serving mess...just plop one onto each plate.

AllenS said...

I loved me some Army food. If I have anything going for me is my ability to eat anything. I am not fussy. I even liked c rations. I also considered long-range reconnaissance patrol rations as a delicacy when we first started to get them. Just add water!

Ann Althouse said...

"... but you did not have to eat it twice a week in an Army messhall."

Yes, but she did.

tim in vermont said...

I prefer sardines on toast, from this sub-genre of comestibles, and who came up with this abomination of removing the skin and bones from sardines? Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should.

Shawn Levasseur said...

To be fair the complaints came from an article from someone who wasn't on the plane .

The tweet from the on-plane journalist itself seems to be focused more on the whimsical Jack-O-Lantern design of the stuffed pepper.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Gahrie said: But SOS is made with ground beef, not chipped beef, and each service has its own recipe.

If you like creamed chipped beef or your version with ground beef....(and I do too. They are good!) Then you probably will love sausage gravy, Southern style. Poured over hot fresh buttermilk biscuits. All you need is some scrambled eggs on the side.

Mattman26 said...

I thought “cruller.” Is that the same as a “fritter?”

tim in vermont said...

Now that I think about it, I have a food I like that everybody goes ape shit when I eat it. Scrapple, or as I call it “Scrap ... ul” They all insist on reading the ingredients, or shout out ewww! No, I don’t like it when they do it. Now I feel shame....

wendybar said...

Why are we taxpayers paying for 'so called" Journalists to eat anyways....they should have to pay for their meals...like we do if we fly commericial!!!

BarrySanders20 said...

I guess people see what they want to see.
It's a fritter, by the way. Glazed sugar over fried dough. Jeez.

Kevin said...

How many of these people woke up today and thought, “I’m going to spend precious moments of my finite life trying to get others absolutely incensed today about a salad?”

Probably none.

And yet here they are.

David53 said...

I had a chance to work a short project with some senior Air Force One Flight Attendants a few years ago, they were an extremely professional and tight lipped group. They said nothing negative about any of the ruling elites. One of their duties is "Plans all menus and coordinates meal requirements. Purchases and prepares required food and supplies to serve meals." Of course the President eats what he wants and the Attendants plan and prepare accordingly. Trump may have ordered that especially for the press corps, who knows. I did learn that Hillary liked French cuisine, she would order two plates of exactly the same thing, they would bring both plates out at the same time, she would point at the one she wanted and the other plate would be trashed.

Agree with Ann about SOS. Make it with chipped beef out of the jar.

Kevin said...

Some of the outraged will be voting on impeachment.

Think about that.

bagoh20 said...

That went viral? Or is that just how we do hyperbole today?

And obviously the thing in the back is baby Kurd kurd with a Reisling glaze.

Ken B said...

Glazed scone was my thought, so I agree with MayBee. Certainly some glazed desert.

Big Mike said...

My husband never had these things before and was really sceptical when I first made creamed tuna. He loves it.

Or he loves you.

Read what you wrote about sausage gravy over buttermilk biscuits. Just reading it made my arteries turn to stone! But delicious all the same.

rehajm said...

Could it not happen that someone could express a fondness for this food without getting it shit on? I think not.

Freebird!!! Freebird!!!

Fernandinande said...

Even The Daily Mail is bad*, with some suggesting the President himself would not read it!

*They used the words "deeply" and "viral" in one sentence.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

@ Skylark.

No shame in liking scrapple. It is also great comfort food.

If you really want to gross out your friends, tell them how to make head cheese or black puddings. (both of which I also really like)

I had some elderly friends from Denmark (deceased long ago) who used to make a version of head cheese every year and give it out as gifts for Christmas. It was delicious!!!

Openidname said...

Bread pudding. With a sugar-based sauce on top. 7 out of 10, would eat.

If you blow it up, you can see a cube of bread sticking out of it. The cube could also be consistent with stuffing, but the main body of the substance isn't lumpy enough to be stuffing (plus who serves stuffing with salad?).

Greg Hlatky said...

Journalists should be given bag nasties and learn to be grateful for them.

rcocean said...

SPAM is the worst, but some people LOVE It. Incredible. I heard all the army jokes, but decided to give it a try with some Hawaiian friends who cooked it with pineapple and rice. Sorry, it was awful. I have mainstream tastes and all the foods with bad reps - i hate too. chipped beef, pork pies, SPAM, and liver.

Stuffed Peppers are good, I don't know what the journalists are complaining about, I like mine with hamburger, tomatoes, onions, and rice.

chuck said...

I loved me some Army food.

My Dad gained 30 lbs after he joined in the summer of 1941. He grew up in WV, born between the railroad tracks and a whore house, as he put it.

Bob Boyd said...

I bet the President had ice cream on his...what ever it is.
The press pool didn't get any.
It's Trump policy never to give them a scoop if he can help it.

Lucien said...

If President Trump really wanted to scare them for Halloween he’d put two scoops of ice cream under the pepper.

tcrosse said...

At least the pepper's expression is a smile. It could have been a smirk, a sneer, or even a frown. Or maybe the smile is insincere.

Ken B said...

I too had chipped beef on toast regularly as a kid, and liked it. A generational thing; Canada was poorer in the 60s than it is today.

RLB_IV said...

The media should be glad they were not served excréments de chien en papillote.

Big Mike said...

@rcocean, I grew up in a household much less than wealthy, and got used to having my mother fry up slices of spam for us for dinner now and again. It wasn't all that bad. Now her recipe for stuffed peppers?!? I still can't look at a stuffed pepper without getting queasy.

Francisco D said...

Can't tell what the pepper is stuffed with, but my choice would be Italian sausage with and herb seasoned bread crumb base and perhaps some cheeses like a Parmesan Asseago blend.

I make stuffed peppers (red, yellow and orange) with quinoa, black beans and aged cheddar. It's my only vegetarian dish and it is delicious. My wife doesn't eat veggies, so I make it when she isn't going to be home for dinner. She does not know what she is missing.

I grew up eating green pepper stuffed with rice and hamburger. It was awful.

Char Char Binks, Esq. said...

You can ruin any food with a disgusting description.

Rasperries? They look like red pustules. Is that alfredo sauce, or bull semen? That guacamole looks like toxic waste. Is that a Baby Ruth?

Yancey Ward said...

Seriously, you don't recognize a chicken thigh?

No, Trump would not eat that- he was eating a Big Mac with fries.

Unknown said...

My dad, an Oklahoma boy, ate SOS in the USN (1941-46) and thought it gourmet fare. We ate it for Saturday breakfast for 20 years. Stouffers used to make a pretty good frozen product.

Yancey Ward said...

Doug wrote:

"And were this served on zerobama's press plane, it would make the style sections of the NYT, WaPoo, and LA Times with plaudits all around."

Yes, this! There would be a two page article with photo spread in People on the food of Air Force One, with an entire paragraph devoted to the healty benefits of the orange pepper and the whimsy of plating.

tcrosse said...

You can ruin any food with a disgusting description.

In the Navy we had a tuna-noodle concoction which was nicknamed Dead Japs. We also had Horse Cock and Monkey Peters.

Yancey Ward said...

My mother regularly made stuffed green peppers when I was a child. They basically had meatloaf inside. I loved them. It was only years later when I realized that my mother hated both meatloaf and peppers of any kind.

Yancey Ward said...

"And obviously the thing in the back is baby Kurd kurd with a Reisling glaze."

I read as Kurd turd at first. Yikes!

Kelly said...

When I was little my mom use to make chipped beef on toast and we loved it. As an Adult I decided to make it and yuck. Too salty and not a fan any longer.

Ann Althouse said...

""Of Cash and Hash" is the one what learned me how to cook."

It's good to know that the way to make chicken soup is to pour boiling water from a kettle into the rear hole of a raw chicken and straight through the neck hole into the bowl. But don't eat it. Just throw it on Moe's back. And if you're the Moe in this scenario and you get really really mad, the thing to say is "Why, you!"

Ann Althouse said...

"If you like creamed chipped beef or your version with ground beef....(and I do too. They are good!) Then you probably will love sausage gravy, Southern style. Poured over hot fresh buttermilk biscuits. All you need is some scrambled eggs on the side. "

Hey, I was just going to say — before I got to your comment — that we didn't have chipped beef for breakfast, but we did have pancakes with sausage and sausage gravy on the pancakes. Were we Southern? Only if you consider Delaware the South. We didn't, but I know some people do (especially black people, I have been told, by black people who laughed at me for saying I didn't think of Delaware as the South).

Anyway, my mother was from Michigan, and I think she was cooking things my father liked. His parents came from the part of the country that used to be called "Pennsylvania Dutch."

Ann Althouse said...

"My husband never had these things before and was really sceptical when I first made creamed tuna. He loves it."

Oh, that takes me back to cooking for someone who'd had some sort of oral surgery that required a soft diet. I made creamed tuna on mashed potatoes. I didn't need soft food myself, but I really enjoyed it!

Susan said...

Creamed chipped beef was a huge favorite with my hubby and kids. Once I didn't have any bread but did have a couple of cans of those pop out of a can crescent rolls in the fridge. I laid them out flat to bake so they'd be toast shaped and it was a huge hit. They don't get soggy like toast does. Made it that way ever since.

Char Char Binks, Esq. said...

Most people have never heard of Delaware, but those who have know it's actually part of the South (the northern part).

PJ said...

That pepper is openly leering at those tomatoes.

stevew said...

My mother served baked tuna noodle casserole, with crumpled potato chips on top, regularly. It was delicious. Quite a few people over the years have rolled their eyes about that and my assertion of deliciousness.

I zoomed in on that thing and can't figure out exactly what it is, but I'm nearly certain it is a pastry of some sort, not meat(ish). That bit sticking out in the back looks like a crouton - so maybe something savory rather than sweet?

If I have to bet I'll put my money on a glazed scone.

Rick.T. said...

Grew up on SOS in the 50's and 60's as some others did. Also with the jarred beef. Not sure if it was the influence of my father who served in the Air Force during the Korean War. Haven't had it in years but have eaten the occasional biscuits and gravy since moving South.

My father would never eat a PB and J sandwich due to being in air/sea rescue and that's all they had to eat sometimes. Unfortunately, he also picked up smoking then.

Cruellers are a twisty round donut and not the same as fritters.

tim in vermont said...

"His parents came from the part of the country that used to be called 'Pennsylvania Dutch.’"

Birthplace of scrapple.

Yancey Ward said...

sausage gravy on the pancakes.

I tried that combination once at Cracker Barrel, I didn't like it. Sausage gravy is best done over buttermilk biscuits, and/or mixed with fried eggs.

tim in vermont said...

You know what I miss as a real comfort food? Those gold cans of pulled chicken the US Department of Agriculture used to give out before food stamps. I don’t miss the powdered eggs, or the powdered milk, but that chicken was great. With gravy on homemade biscuits that were of a texture of perfection that I haven’t had since. My mother learned to make those biscuits from my Grandmother, born in the 1880s.

Michael K said...

We also had Horse Cock and Monkey Peters.

My uncle loved Polish blood sausage he bought on a little house boat in the Calumet river south of Chicago. He called it "Horse Cock Sausage." It was awful.

Howard said...

According to recently tape JRE Podcast w/ Kyle KuLinski, Trump juices on British imported extra strength Sudafed. Apparently its in the famous Taco Bowl Cinco de Mayo photo. Kyle does have a good Trump voice that captures Donald's sense of humor

Howard said...

Stuffed bell pepper screams 1972

Dr Weevil said...

AA (8:04):
You don't mention one of the advantages of the little glass jars with pry-off lids that chipped beef came in (and may still come in: I've gotten lazy and buy the frozen chipped beef with the sauce included). After you pry off the metal lid and throw it away, the jar makes an excellent 4 oz juice glass. In fact, I suspect one of the juice glasses in my kitchen cabinet was a chipped-beef jar long ago. I've certainly had it, and drunk out of it, for decades.

tim in vermont said...

It might be part of the South, but it’s not part of Dixie.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason–Dixon_line#/media/File:Mason-dixon-line.gif

Drago said...

dishes mentioned in this thread:

Chipped beef on Toast.

Stuffed Peppers (hopefully with a high quality melted cheese covering the meat/rice mixture in the pepper).

Tuna noodle casserole.

Loved every one of these dishes as I was growing up in a large Navy family.

Karen said...

Oh the chipped beef in a jar and my mama’s cream sauce! You are evoking memories! My dad was career military and served during the war in Germany. We also often ate a dish my folks called SOS which was beautifully browned ground beef, seasoned with salt and pepper, dusted with flour, caramelized and then turned into a tasty gravy by adding cold milk and cooking until it bubbled and thickened. SOS was for s+*< on a shingle, but my mama was a good cook and even the toast on which it was served was crisp, hot and delicious.

ga6 said...

Tuna fish casserole made with Jays Potato Chip, canned peas, canon Campbell mushroom soup and a jar of sliced mushrooms..

1950s when canned tuna was very cheap

FullMoon said...

All good stuff. White man soul food.
Someone above had to ruin it by mentioning liver.


As an adult, figured I would give liver a second chance to see if it was simply a childish aversion.

Nope, that stuff remains disgusting, I don't care who you are.

Jersey Fled said...

Looks way better than anything I ever ate on Eastern Airlines.

Ralph L said...

Were we the only ones who called corned beef hash "dog food?"

Francisco D said...

My mother served baked tuna noodle casserole, with crumpled potato chips on top, regularly. It was delicious.

Did she use Campbell's Cream of Mushroom soup as the base, like my mother did?

I really liked it as a kid, but haven't tried it as an adult.

Ken B said...

I do love the reaction of some of our classier and better members to chipped beef: peasant food makes you a peasant.

Good crowd for a Hillary fundraiser!

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Full Moon; Someone above had to ruin it by mentioning liver.

:-) Ah...but it was Calf Liver. That makes all the difference. Milk fed calves/veal if you will. Buttery smooth and sweet. Unlike the bitter, sour, tough cow livers you get today. Mom would flour, salt and pepper and saute the calves liver in butter in a covered skillet. Served with beautiful golden butter sauteed sliced onion. Never overcook liver. For some reason people think you need to turn it into shoe leather. Sweet and salty.***

Try and get calves liver today. Can't. Also try to find a decent young frying chicken (3 to 3.5 lb at most). Instead we have these giant 6 to 7 pound monsters. Those are the Stewing hens in the olden days that were tough and beyond their sell by date.

It is hard to cook great food with sub par ingredients.

*** I know. You won't be convinced. Your loss :-)

alanc709 said...

As i mentioned earlier, sausage gravy over hash browns (preferably crispy). Can't stand when I get unbrowned hash browns- hash whites. Might as well serve shredded mash potatoes.

Char Char Binks, Esq. said...

Delaware, East of Dixie

Freeman Hunt said...

Why would anyone complain about a festive stuffed pepper and a dessert? Those complaints are the stuff of looking insane.

(I've been wanting to make stuffed peppers recently. I think I will steal this idea for tomorrow.)

Freeman Hunt said...

"Try and get calves liver today. Can't. Also try to find a decent young frying chicken (3 to 3.5 lb at most). Instead we have these giant 6 to 7 pound monsters."

You should come here, home of Tyson chicken. You can buy chicken of any size!

MadisonMan said...

got used to having my mother fry up slices of spam for us for dinner now and again.

Mom would plop the whole spam out, stud it with cloves, slather it in brown sugar, and bake. It wasn't her worst recipe.
We had SOS only once or twice that I recall.

JaimeRoberto said...

Won't somebody please think of the poor, starving journalists?

tim in vermont said...

“What did you do in the war daddy?”

“I was the guy who came up with ‘shit on a shingle.’"

RBE said...

Grew up with Stouffer's brand creamed chipped beef, spinach souffle and tuna noodle casserole. The beef was a in boiling bag. I would "cook" it for dinner when I was home alone. Later on during the 70's the small lasagna was a favorite. Still love Stouffer's frozen foods.

FullMoon said...

Party Time !

Spam-n-Cheese Ribbon loaf


https://cdn.historydaily.org/content/61930/f62883df6a6c3aba81311ee8857bcd4d.jpg

Tommy Duncan said...

My brother and I have always enjoyed radish sandwiches: Sliced radishes on heavily buttered bread with salt and a bit of pepper.

As kids we ate a lot of cream style cord on heavily buttered bread. Heavily buttered bread was a major theme at our house.

Butter, salt, lard and gravy were the foundation of our food pyramid.

tim in vermont said...

Bully Beef was another favorite. Apparently that’s a British armed forces thing, but my dad spent a lot of time with British forces during the war, so maybe that’s why we always had it around.

FullMoon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jim at said...

Serve 'em hemlock next time. It's what they deserve.

Char Char Binks, Esq. said...

"Lettuce, tomato, mayo on Wonder Bread." -- sounds horrible!

Birkel said...

Love chipped beef on toast with a nice gravy.
Yummy!!!

Gcraw said...

Perhaps the journalists can bring a sack lunch and the cabin attendants can offer a small bag of pretzels. Sort of like how most people travel. Good grief.

Milwaukie guy said...

Delaware was a slave state but only had 8,000 slaves. They were sort of a border state that went all Union, unlike the other three had various other scenarios. Lincoln suspended habeas corpus in Maryland, because I believe both the governor and legislature were secess. Kentucky was treated as a neutral border zone and in Missouri, the Feds sponsored a state coup d'état. Lincoln did all this, and called for 75,000 volunteers, before the new Congress could meet.

Executive privilege.

rcocean said...

Tuna noodle casserole - I liked it as a Kid. It tasted better when my Mom switched to Frozen peas vs. Canned ones or even better, used fresh ones.

Stuffed Bell Peppers - Red bell peppers are best, but the pepper is really just an excuse to eat the "Stuffing". I've eaten it homemade and in a college cafeteria, and the homemade can be 10x better. Its one of those dishes, you need the right ingredients and quality beef.

Shepard's Pie - Loved it as kid, tried it a couple years ago, and well "You can't home again". Maybe i needed the old-time 75/25 ground beef instead of 90/10.

wildswan said...

I loved chipped beef on toast (as we called it) when my mother made it but I've been afraid to try it again. Wasn't sure exactly how it was made back in the day - now I know. Someday ...

mamawolf said...

It’s an apple fritter.

Bunkypotatohead said...

The stuff inside the pepper looks more questionable than the dessert.
Next time the ungrateful journalists should be served only the salt and pepper shakers...with a glass of water.

stevew said...

@Francisco D: Yes she did!

P.S. That Campbells Mushroom soup was magic, mom used it in the green bean casserole too!

Ann Althouse said...

In northern Delaware, in Wilmington, our TV channels were all Philadelphia and we heard ourselves called the tri-state area, grouping us with Pennsylvania and New Jersey. We were taught that we lived in the mid-Atlantic part of the country, which was the east coast between New England and the South and included New York l

Michael K said...

Francisco D said...
My mother served baked tuna noodle casserole, with crumpled potato chips on top, regularly. It was delicious.

Did she use Campbell's Cream of Mushroom soup as the base, like my mother did?


My mother-in-law, in the days before much in the way of frozen foods, made quick recipes as she worked full time.

Tuna casserole was one of my favorites and included Cream of Mushroom soup. She also made a great hamburger casserole. It frustrated her daughter no end that I loved that stuff.

Francisco D said...

P.S. That Campbells Mushroom soup was magic, mom used it in the green bean casserole too!

You are talking Norwegian haute cuisine, which includes creamed herring and ham with raisin sauce.

Hercules, not that one though said...

Never heard it called chipped beef on toast. It was SOS. I don't think it was beef.

Gahrie said...

Shepard's Pie - Loved it as kid, tried it a couple years ago, and well "You can't home again". Maybe i needed the old-time 75/25 ground beef instead of 90/10.

I make Shepard's Pie a lot. (although what we Americans call Shepard's Pie is actually Cottage Pie because it's made with ground beef. Real Shepard's Pie is made with lamb or mutton) I've made it all kinds of ways, from frozen vegetables, instant mashed potatoes and package gravy, to fresh vegetables, real mashed potatoes and scratch gravy. The real key seems to be the gravy.

Nichevo said...

Ann Althouse said...
In northern Delaware, in Wilmington, our TV channels were all Philadelphia and we heard ourselves called the tri-state area


Babe-the tri-state area is NY-NJ-CT. Conceivably NY-NJ-PA. Did you radio say in just those words that their notion of tri-state was actually PA-NJ-DE? What station, what year? I'd have to look into that.

And yes, Delaware is the South.

Is Delaware considered the South?
The South Atlantic States: Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. The East South Central States: Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee. The West South Central States: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki
Southern United States - Wikipedia

Nichevo said...

Ok you win on tri-state, but I say you people are coming it a bit high:


Wikipedia › wiki › Tri-state_area
Web results
Tri-state area - Wikipedia
Tri-state area is an informal term in the eastern contiguous United States for any of several ... The Delaware Valley region, which includes eastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, and northern Delaware.
Tri-state areas

Ann Althouse said...

Keep in mind that I'm talking about the perceptions of the people who actually lived there and I mean 60+ years ago. I happen to know that the white people did not consider themselves to be in the south.

But I learned in later life that black people definitely see Delaware as the south. And based on my own personal experience seeing black people in Wilmington, Delaware in the 1950s and some extra things I've learned (such as from reading cases about segregation in Wilmington, Delaware), I understand that perception.

I'm willing to call Delaware southern out of deference to that perception. So all I'm saying is the culture I lived in did not consider itself southern.

Whether the internet/wikipedia are caught up to that I don't know.

Nichevo said...

Not to goad you further, but it might be interesting for you to go on wiki and make edits to reflect your views.

Danno said...

Ann said..."Hey, I was just going to say — before I got to your comment — that we didn't have chipped beef for breakfast, but we did have pancakes with sausage and sausage gravy on the pancakes. Were we Southern? Only if you consider Delaware the South. We didn't, but I know some people do (especially black people, I have been told, by black people who laughed at me for saying I didn't think of Delaware as the South)."

The Mason-Dixon Line does a right turn at the Pa.-De. border, so it is technically north of the line. But Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland had some Southern sympathies and sympathizers back in the day, even though both remained in the Union during the Civil War. So you can say you are in the middle. Cruel neutrality?

RobinGoodfellow said...

Blogger Unknown said...
My dad, an Oklahoma boy, ate SOS in the USN (1941-46) and thought it gourmet fare.


I would imagine living through the Great Depression would would provide true focus, particularly in regards to what constitutes acceptable food. My mother, one of four children of a widowed mother, said they would have starved but for the garden her Uncle Joe kept out back.

I once worked with a woman who swore she grew up so poor that dinner was sometimes just rice with sugar and butter.

Personally, I love chipped beef on toast. My wife introduced me to it. Said she ate it all the tome growing up (her grandfather was in the navy in Korea).

RobinGoodfellow said...

Blogger Char Char Binks said...
Most people have never heard of Delaware, but those who have know it's actually part of the South (the northern part).


It’s in the name, which came from Baron de la Warr.

As everyone should know, slave (southern) states were named after aristocracy (King George, King Charles, the Virgin Queen, Queen Maria of France, Baron de la Warr). Free states were not.

Many people argue that the American civil war was a rerun of the English civil war—roundheads vs cavaliers, and all that.

YMMV.