July 9, 2019

So true.

36 comments:

J. Farmer said...

Precisely why I like to use frozen spinach. Save the fresh for a salad.

tim maguire said...

I always misjudge when I cook spinach. But I eat it fresh or in smoothies most of the time so it's not a big deal.

Puck said...

Bah! I love sautéed fresh spinach. Olive oil, butter, salt, spinach. Don’t cook it very long. Perfect.

Bob R said...

Absolutely! I love cooked fresh spinach, but you need a bushel for a single serving. Frozen's not as good, but it's good enough for me and always in the freezer.

Kay said...

I love this meme everytime I see it.

Kay said...

Frozen spinach always has a mushy consistency that you don’t get with fresh spinach.

Lucid-Ideas said...

So little spinach left
So much money only to see it wilt
Green evaporates

Ann Althouse said...

Just put it in a smoothie and be glad it disappears into nothing but a light green tinge.

MayBee said...

Hahahahaha! I love people.

exhelodrvr1 said...

Somewhat related topic - the thread and subsequent comments on what people don't like about recipes is pretty funny (the tips sound practical, although I'm pretty much a non-cooker)

https://twitter.com/chezspence/status/1147999593973633024

Ralph L said...

Squeeze it real hard, wait a few million years, and presto--a cubic micron of coal.

I've had deep-fried red cabbage shavings that were tasty, and I can't abide even the smell of normally-cooked cabbage. I wonder what other leafy greens would do, dissolve?

JAORE said...

I love to see women in the south carrying HUGE bundles of collard greens knowing how small the end product will be.

stevew said...

And that, on the right, is the precise amount of spinach I want with my meal. ;-)

If only kale would do the same...

iowan2 said...

The simple act of eating spinach contributes to Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Climate Change. Cultivating, harvesting, processing, and shipping spinach thousands of miles in refrigerated transports into towns and cities across the globe is a life threatening process to engage in simple elitist virtue signaling. The environmental costs, weighed against the nutritional value? You and all your neighbors might as well be using coal in your outside fire pits.

chuck said...

Just a few more debates will do the job.

Howard said...

I prefer my spinach from a can.

Phil 314 said...

I thought it was an image analogy for global warming.

alanc709 said...

Makes you understand Popeye a little better.

Gahrie said...

Is this supposed to be a metaphor for the collusion allegations?

Ralph L said...

I love to see women in the south carrying HUGE bundles of collard greens knowing how small the end product will be.

If only it would disappear entirely. Every 25 years or so, I try some greens in the hope they've improved.

J. Farmer said...

If only it would disappear entirely. Every 25 years or so, I try some greens in the hope they've improved.

A few dashes of hot pepper vinegar make all the difference.

CJinPA said...

Conclusion: NEVER COOK SPINACH.

Fresh Spinach = Crunchy, healthy delight
Cooked Spinach = Satan's Mucus

Roy Lofquist said...

"A few dashes of hot pepper vinegar make all the difference."

Does wonders for strawberry shortcake too.

EDH said...

Spinach contains lots of oxalate which is believed to cause the most common form of kidney stone, calcium-oxalate.

Mixing spinach with calcium-rich foods in a meal (eg yogurt in a smoothie) actually lessens the risk by creating the calcium-oxalate bond in the digestive tract where it is eliminated.

What they say you don’t want is free oxalate entering your blood system where it can bond with calcium to form crystals in the kidneys especially when dehydrated.

EDH said...

Popeye had much the same reaction the first time he got under Olive Oil’s sweater, although some would say her flexibility made her a tiger in bed.

Howard said...

Thanks EDH, now I know why Grandma liked creamed spinach so much
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12810415

The Cracker Emcee Refulgent said...

I guess it's what you're used to. I love cooked spinach with lashings of red pepper. Fresh, uncooked, spinach has all the appeal of cellophane.

Char Char Binks said...

"What they say you don’t want is free oxalate entering your blood system where it can bond with calcium to form crystals in the kidneys especially when dehydrated."

How about you just drink enough water so you don't get dehydrated?

rcocean said...

reminds me of that horrible canned spinach from childhood. Eat spinach raw.

Anthony said...

I luuuurve collards. This is the way to make them.

Deb said...

A few dashes of hot pepper vinegar make all the difference.

My mother put a little sugar in collards and turnip greens (our greens of choice. Spinach was a little too sophisticated) to offset the bitterness. Plus lots of cornbread to sop up the pot likker. :-)

Yancey Ward said...

Gahrie wrote:

"Is this supposed to be a metaphor for the collusion allegations?"

You, sir, win today's internet competition!

Yancey Ward said...

Properly prepared, spinach is one of my favorite foods. However, when I buy it from the store, I almost always use it in salads and as the leafy component on sandwiches. When I do cook it, however, I always just buy canned spinach.

Unknown said...

Your tax dollars to the government; your benefit from the tax dollars you paid.

Unknown said...

Anthony said...

I luuuurve collards. This is the way to make them.


That's a great recipe. I also add a tablespoon or two of brown sugar, and 1/3 cup of home made spice mix (mostly smoked paprika, plus both black and white pepper, some cayenne, granulated garlic, granulated onion, thyme, oregano and basil.

J. Farmer said...

@Anthony:

I luuuurve collards.

Same. They were a staple growing up. I grew up in a culinary extended family. My paternal grandparents owned and operated restaurants, bars, and hotels their whole lives. My maternal grandmother owned a restaurant. The Tampa Bay region is an amalgam of low-country, cracker, Cuban, and Italian-American cuisine. Growing up, the traditional New Year’s Day meal was a mojo pork, black eyed peas, white rice with gravy, and collard greens.