January 10, 2019

New evidence, answering a 14-year-old question.

On February 20, 2005, I asked whether it's "party hardy" or "party hearty." The NYT had written "party hardy," and that was the first time I'd noticed the near homophones and the potential for either word to make sense — with a slight difference of meaning:
If you're trying to wish the person well in holding up to all that drinking, it's "hardy." If you want them to have a lot of rollicking fun, it's "hearty." If you're trying to say both, stick to the spoken word. If you're the NYT, and you mean to insult the catty, exclusionary state school girls, "hardy" actually is the better choice.
 I love when people comment on old posts, especially really old posts, and I was pleased to see that "Unknown" stopped by last night to contribute this:

28 comments:

David Begley said...

I was on my motorcycle at 24th and St. Mary’s about ten years ago and a woman asked me If I wanted to party. I eventually figured it out.

tim maguire said...

The embed doesn't work for me:

The webpage at https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/embed/f561336b-8815-4207-adb5-e3b94d9d1412?autoplay=false might be temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a new web address.

Unknown said...

Apropos of nothing, my collegiate fraternity threw a party called Pardi Hardi with Bacardi.

Ann Althouse said...

The embed works for me. If you can't see it, it's just Bill Murray in "Scrooged" crying, "I Mean, It's A Night. You've Got To Party Hearty, Marty."."

rehajm said...

I've found that saying an anachronism on par with 23 skidoo!

rehajm said...

I need to patronize any post with a Bill Murray tag.

gilbar said...

i'd always assumed it was hearty; but hardy does make more sense. I like the ambiguity

gilbar said...

maybe it's a Floor Wax AND a Dessert Topping?

Paco Wové said...

"Hardy" is the deplorable form of "hearty".

rehajm said...

a woman asked me If I wanted to party. I eventually figured it out.

It took me a couple of episodes to figure out that when in Las Vegas a woman approaches you and asks, 'Do you have the time?' she doesn't want to know what time it is.

Roy Lofquist said...

For us geezers it's party hardly.

Wilbur said...

Like the song says, you've got to take time to make time.

Robert Cook said...

Party hearty.

Nancy said...

A friend was in a Boston bar when a local strode in and asked him "Wheah's da pahdy?" My friend pointed him to the men's room. Lucky he wasn't punched.

Eleanor said...

The Urban Dictionary, which is the arbiter of all such things, says it's "party hearty". Case closed.

Robert Cook said...

People who write (or say) "party hardy" have simply misheard "hearty" as "hardy," just as (maddeningly, more and more) people write "should of" or "would of" and so on because they think the contraction of "have" is the word "of."

Darrell said...

I party heartily because that's just the way I am.

Big Mike said...

There never was any ambiguity. If the Times wrote “party hardy” then it had to be “party hearty” because, you know, the Times.

Fernandistein said...

The American Labor Monthly, Volume 1
American Labor Monthly Pub. Assn., 1923

"Only one daily paper, The Seattle Union-Record gave the Farmer-Labor Party hearty support, while scores of capitalist dailies belched forth their attacks upon the Farmer-Labor program and candidates."

walter said...

Folks in Pardeeville say this is all so wrong..

walter said...

I imagine this issue has come up at parties of linguistics majors.
Along with the novelty and comedic value of the diphthong...at least after a few.

EDH said...

Party bigly.

Mark said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mark said...

The origin of the phrase is "party hard." As in work hard, play hard, party hard, etc. It is not "party heart."

From there, with the "ee" sound in party, it is natural sound-wise to extend the "hard" to "hardy."

Earnest Prole said...

Party foolhardy.

PM said...

There's no way of knowing since the phrase debuted as a verbal exhortation, years before email or texting, which means even autocorrect is suspect. That said, it's hearty.

Earnest Prole said...

The adverbs are heartily and hardily, which illustrate the difference.

Donatello Nobody said...

"As Chairman of the Welcoming Committee, it is my privilege to extend a laurel and hearty handshake..."