June 13, 2018

"I may not be Donald Trump now, but just you wait; if I don't make it, my children will" — said Barack Obama in 1991.

From the incredibly long Wikiquote page for Barack Obama. Full quote, from "Race and Rights Rhetoric", a law school paper:
[Americans have] a continuing normative commitment to the ideals of individual freedom and mobility, values that extend far beyond the issue of race in the American mind. The depth of this commitment may be summarily dismissed as the unfounded optimism of the average American—I may not be Donald Trump now, but just you wait; if I don't make it, my children will.
ADDED: Obama was not the "I" in his own statement. He was speaking in the voice of an American idiot.

74 comments:

Rob McLean said...

I may not be Donald Trump now

He still isn't.

readering said...

Funny that quote dates from 1991.

From WP article:

The concerns that drove Trump's lenders were brought sharply into focus in a telephone conference call in June 1991, when people who had the right to seize the Trump Castle casino chose not to do so. The fear of bankruptcy dominated their deliberations, according to a tape recording of the discussion made available to The Washington Post.

Bankruptcy was "a huge wild card," a participant warned during the strategy session. "This would be a really drawn out, very, very nasty process," he said.

The lenders -- bondholders who had helped finance the Trump Castle casino and hotel -- expressed contempt for the way Trump had managed the casino. But their cynicism about the bankruptcy system outweighed their cynicism about Trump.

Warren Foss, an adviser to the bondholders, advocated letting Trump stay in charge of the casino and paying him an annual $1.4 million management fee, mainly to win Trump's support for a deal that would keep them out of bankruptcy court.

"What is he providing for the million and a half?" one bondholder asked, prompting hearty laughter.

"We hope as little as possible," Foss said, to even greater laughter. "We hope it becomes characterized as a nonmanagement fee."

Gahrie said...

How is that optimism unfounded?

All you have to do is look at examples like Ben Carson and Clarence Thomas to know that this is true.

Hell, look at my favorite African-American. He moved here dead broke and is now worth several billions of dollars. He moved to the United States precisely because he knew individual freedom and opportunity flourished here.

tcrosse said...

I may not be Donald Trump now

He couldn't pass the physical

madAsHell said...

continuing normative commitment

Who the fuck writes like that?? It's not phrased to convey any meaning. It's phrased to convey elite status to the writer.

It's like the dog sitting in the corner licking his balls....cuz it feels good.

gspencer said...

O's children will learn the fine art of griftin' from both him and their mother. They'll be set for life. Trump did it with hard work a concept entirely unfamiliar to Obama.

chickelit said...

Trump is full of positive and that for which he stands. Obama is Mr. negative.

Do the math.

Sebastian said...

"[Americans have] a continuing normative commitment to the ideals of individual freedom and mobility, values that extend far beyond the issue of race in the American mind."

Said with the proper distancing disdain of the progressive intellectual. They would think that, those Americans, bitterly clinging to their illusions.

But progs know better: individual freedom must submit to state power, and mobility can only take the form of coercive redistribution.

anti-de Sitter space said...

One of the librul papers (WaPO and NYT look alike to me, and all real Americans -- who knows cares re a specific reference?) reported that more than 6 outa 10 kids in the States is a CHIPer or Medicaider.


So this BHO quote was from 1991. And, the con seems to be as strong as ever, i.e. the DJT era. Presumably we've got another 27 years, or more, before folks figure differently.


I dunno.

Comanche Voter said...

Well Obama talks a lot; beyond that not so much.

And if Trump's lenders were cynical about the bankruptcy system in 1991, well they hadn't seen nothin' yet. What Obama and his people did to the bankruptcy laws in the Chrysler and GM bailouts in 2008-2009 upended years of settled bankruptcy law. Obama was protecting labor--and "hosing" secured creditors (at leaat they had the rights of secured creditors until Obama and his boys showed up).

Darrell said...

You have to stop sucking from the cock of Socialism first. . .

Inga said...

“I may not be Donald Trump now...”

Eat at McDonald’s more often.

daskol said...

How condescending, sneeringly superior, does that sound now in the Age of Trump? How inappropriate in a leader, to take an analytical dislike of the optimism of the American people. Did anyone ever imagine that Obama loved them, or was it that they just loved him so much? Ann still likes him. But he never even pretended to reciprocate, not even in law school.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

Barack Obama does understand the American psyche, even if his summary dismissal did not work out so well. Wikiquote also has this:

"And Bill Clinton? Well, his campaign's fascinating to a student of politics. It's disturbing to someone who cares about certain issues. But politically, it seems to be working."

As to what he meant by "certain issues" I've always thought Slick Willy was who Michelle Obama was alluding to when she famously said, "For the first time in my adult life, I am proud of my country." The "adult" qualifier leaves room for her to be proud of Jimmy Carter's presidency. As a Democrat, she's not expected to be proud of the Reagan and Bush presidencies. That leaves Bill Clinton as the target of the statement.

dda6ga dda6ga said...

Barack, however you get your money: You Did Not Build That or anything else...

Darrell said...

I could see Barack Obama becoming Hannibal Lecter--at least the eating part. Once you get past dog, it's all downhill.

John Lynch said...

Says the former President!

n.n said...

So, not hopeful optimism, but thinly veiled contempt, thus redistributive and retributive? change.

Freeman Hunt said...

And then Donald Trump was, in position, Barack Obama, and Barack Obama was, in wealth, Donald Trump.

Trippy.

Freeman Hunt said...

Do most people aspire to fabulous wealth. I'm not so sure.

Gahrie said...

"this commitment" is what makes America great. One of the largest pathologies in minority communities is the rejection of this commitment.

Gahrie said...

Do most people aspire to fabulous wealth.

Very few would reject it. But I think most Americans, most people worldwide really, hope that their children live better lives than them.

anti-de Sitter space said...

"Do most people aspire to fabulous wealth. I'm not so sure."

Something makes folks (in a country where more than six outa ten kids are on CHIP or Medicaid) be cool w/ a government that moves more dough up.

I, like you, worry that this can't keep going forever. Sure, North Korea and Cuba et. al. can support massive lopsidedness. But, can DJT or someone else do that here? Maybe. But, it's best to assume not.

I dunno.

anti-de Sitter space said...

Best to liquidate and run up the country's debt ASAP.

Get dough now.

If it keeps flowing for many decades, that's even better.

mariacorina pernalite said...

sea Obama o Trump. Poseen los mismos pensamiento. No se porque tienen esa mentalidad del el racismo cuando eso se abolió hace muchos años y considero que deberían cambiar porque todos somos iguales seres humanos.

Now I Know! said...

Of course Ann misrepresents this quote. She has to stoke her Althouse Hillbillies.

Freeman Hunt said...

I think most people just want to be able to amply provide. I don't think most people sit around dreaming about helicopter skiing or private islands. Well, maybe they dream about private islands when they're around people who drone on about how dumb they think average Americans are for hoping to improve their lives.

Rabel said...

"He was speaking in the voice of an American idiot."

Unless I'm missing your sarcasm, that is incorrect. He was speaking in the voice of an "average American" as he and his co-author saw her. It's right there in the quote.

I'd love to read the rest of that essay but it's either unavailable online or just very hard to find. How bad must the rest of it be?

Now I Know! said...

...which you can see, she got her Hillbillies howling.

Gahrie said...

Of course Ann misrepresents this quote.

Explain to me how Obama did not mean this as an insult to millions of Americans.

Gahrie said...

Unless I'm missing your sarcasm, that is incorrect. He was speaking in the voice of an "average American" as he and his co-author saw her. It's right there in the quote.


You're both right. Obama considers average Americans to be idiots.

rehajm said...

John Mulaney had it right- Trump is not a rich man, he is what a hobo imagines a rich man to be.

mccullough said...

I’ve read that article. It’s titled: The Bitter Clingers

rehajm said...

I don’t k iw why Obama has contempt for me- we’ve never met yet there it is.

Leland said...

You can't keep them down if they start believing in unfounded optimism.

Paco Wové said...

"the unfounded optimism of the average American"

Those morons.

anti-de Sitter space said...

"I think most people just want to be able to amply provide."=most kids (i.e. more than 6/10) being on Medicaid and CHIP.=livin' the Am dream.

buwaya puti said...

Providing medical insurance for all children is actually quite cheap, relatively speaking.

The expensive people are the elderly.

If the Democrats had passed some free Medicaid for children in 2009-10, they would probably have gotten it and it would be not-too controversial today.

Indeed, if the Democrats had gone for a stretch goal and tried for Canadian-style, with the caveat that it would be Canadian-style in EVERY way, none of that procedural waste and liability CYA BS or medical billing systems, they could pay for the whole thing with current Medicare/Medicaid revenues already, its that cheap in Canada. State medical spending would be a lagniappe.

I have pointed this out before, and often. The big difference between the US and anyone else in medical finance is not how the US pays for it, the world has many systems, very different from each other, and they all work more or less well. What really matters is how incredibly much the US pays.

The US argument over all this is absurd, fake.

Drago said...

anti-de Sitter space: "One of the librul papers (WaPO and NYT look alike to me, and all real Americans..."

It was just this very day that Inga informed us the Washington Post and the Stanford University papers were "rightist propaganda".

I'm sorry you didn't get memo.

#WhenMoronLeftyTalkingPointsCollide

Inga said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Crazy Jane said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Inga said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Inga said...

“It was just this very day that Inga informed us the Washington Post and the Stanford University papers were "rightist propaganda".”

Except that’s a lie.

#PropagandistsGottaPropagndize

anti-de Sitter space said...

Freeman,

Buw is hinting at my fear.

That is that folks will stop having your POV, and instead they'll think that it's okay fer the gov to pay for folks who haven't made it.

That's bad cause we gotta keep the taker:maker ratio in balance. If ya didn't make it, ya can't take it = that's theft = MAGA!

Stephen Cooper said...

I have a friend who went to high school with Obama, and I went to law school with one of his closest advisors. I do not consider him to be more elite than I could have been if I wanted. I have not read his autobiography but I am not interested, I have met lots of self-obsessed Ivy League mediocrities like him, I am happy he got married and that his wife pumped out a couple of babies ---- that is the best one can hope for philosophically mediocre people like him. Have fun surfing the zeitgeist, Barrryy!

Agree with him or not, you have to admit, he was an expert in speaking in the voice of the kind of American idiot he despises.
It comes naturally to the little guy.

anti-de Sitter space said...

"I do not consider him to be more elite than I could have been if I wanted"


Ha ha ha ha ha!

Yur awesome!!

anti-de Sitter space said...

Incredible! In the Birt sense.

buwaya said...

PB&J,

It would cut the costs of every maker hugely.
That employer mandate thing is incredible. Hidden tax.
And your tax-tax for this is itself high.
This approach would lower taxes besides, state tax particularly.
Very maker-centric.

All it requires is jumping out of the box you all are in.
You especially PB&J, your mind is in an armor-plate box.

buwaya said...

It would require breaking many, many rice bowls.
What you need for that is to start a medical cost jihad.
A fanatical rage to eliminate process and overhead, a bloody rage.

Are you ready for that PB&J?

buwaya said...

And you could do that now without messing with financing.
When everything is much cheaper it's much less interesting to argue where the money comes from.

Seeing Red said...

Medicaid is almost free. It was $5 to see my dr.

EDH said...

Althouse said...
He was speaking in the voice of an American idiot.

I prefer the term “cock-eyed optimist”.

Seeing Red said...

Something makes folks (in a country where more than six outa ten kids are on CHIP or Medicaid) be cool w/ a government that moves more dough up


Marriage bad. Single motherhood celebrated.

narciso said...

Obama admitted in 2007, he couldn't bring about single payer, t hats how we won the Iowa primaries, it would need to happen innstages.

anti-de Sitter space said...

Buw,

One of the librul MSM fake newsers recently reported that there is a rabies med that costs between $3000 and $16,000 depending where you are in the States.

But, it's $1,600 in Canada.

You wanna upend that circumstance? And other circumstances like that?

If so, yur making an error when you think yur opposing my sorta thinkin'.



buwaya said...

Well there you go PB&J.

You are American, and you say you are wealthy and all.

Its your politics, so go reduce medical costs. Start your jihad.
Thats your real problem, I have pointed it out, and you agree. Go fix it.

Tom said...

As Lou Holtz said, "I was born with a silver spoon in my mouth... because I was born an American". Of course, Lou was dirt floor poor growing up.


I never aspired be Donald Trump. I do aspire to be the best version of me. What I've found is that those who create the most value for others tend to also make the most money.

Biff said...

[Americans have] a continuing normative commitment to the ideals of individual freedom and mobility, values that extend far beyond the issue of race in the American mind. The depth of this commitment may be summarily dismissed as the unfounded optimism of the average American—I may not be Donald Trump now, but just you wait; if I don't make it, my children will.

Translation: Americans have hope ("If I don't make it, my children will."), and they desire change ("individual freedom and mobility"), but it's not the sort of "Hope and Change" that depends on Democratic politicians, so that's bad.

Michael K said...

"it would be Canadian-style in EVERY way, none of that procedural waste and liability "

Canadian style would never be accepted any more than the NHS would be.

The French system is excellent and has the highest patient rating in Europe (That is by people who actually used it) but it uses a market mechanism and so would never be acceptable to the political left.

It was also funded by payroll deduction but the high unemployment in France, plus millions of freeloaders have ruined that part.

buwaya said...

It doesn't matter if its French, Canadian, Australian or Swedish.

The US already collects enough in payroll and other taxes to "buy" a first-world medical-care delivery system, which is really what we are talking about. That is, one already paid for out of taxes, "single payer" if you like. Or not, if you don't. Cut payroll taxes and keep (much cheaper) employer mandates. It doesn't really matter. Whatever financing scheme you like, its feasible, because its already flush with money. At Euro-global First-world costs that is.

The US problem has nothing to do with financing, but with cost of medical services delivery. The US is horribly inefficient. Its the most inefficient in the world.

anti-de Sitter space said...

The Canadians also have much more gov control of banking.

Efficient Canadians.

Gahrie said...

The US problem has nothing to do with financing, but with cost of medical services delivery. The US is horribly inefficient. Its the most inefficient in the world.

Freedom is inefficient. The major selling point for government control of medical is to make it more efficient. The problem is, a major tool of that efficiency is rationing.


Medical care is expensive for three reasons.


1) Most people don't pay for it and so don't care what it costs. Either the government is giving it to them or their insurance company pays.

2) The government effectively controls prices through medicare payments.

3) Heavy government regulation and demands for paperwork.

Gahrie said...

Look at what has happened to the costs of plastic surgery or Lasik surgery. Both have dropped and continue to drop even as other forms of surgery continue to go up. Why? Because neither is usually covered by insurance and so people have to pay for it themselves.

jaydub said...

"He was speaking in the voice of an American idiot."

Every word Barry ever uttered was spoken in the voice of an American idiot.

Birkel said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Birkel said...

Gahrie,
The same price reductions have happened in veterinary medicine. And most of the drugs, procedures, and devices are very similar to human medicine.

William Chadwick said...

". . . continuing normative commitment . . ."

Classic.

Amexpat said...

Well, I ride on a mail train, baby, can't buy a thrill
Well, I been up all night leanin' on the windowsill
Well, if I die on top of the hill
And if I don't make it, you know my baby will

Ctmom4 said...

He never really hid his contempt for us. It still amazes me that so many were fooled by him.They saw what they wanted to see.

BUMBLE BEE said...

Obama spoke in sneer. I can't imagine being an Honest Liberal Democrat member of congress with Barry, Harry and Nancy at the wheel. Unopposed is UnAmerican.

Breezy said...

—I may not be Donald Trump now, but just you wait; if I don't make it, my children will.

Ha ha remember that Obama mic drop proclaiming Trump will never be president? Even Trump has unfounded optimism! That darned American spirit...!

tim maguire said...

Obama was not the "I" in his own statement. He was speaking in the voice of an American idiot.

Which would, in fact, be his own voice. Or perhaps the voice of the people who voted for him.

Never in history has so much praise been heaped by so many on one so undeserving.

stlcdr said...

Ok, so trying to figure out what this quoted section of text (sic) is saying: it’s, as noted, a sneering comment.

It appears that it’s tring to pimp race and racism as something that’s more important than, In this case, freedom and the desire to succeed. Essentially a statement to continue to drive a wedge between blacks and whites. He is saying that it’s a stupid notion that blacks can succeed by adopting the farsical American desire for freedom and the success that comes with it.

Maybe I’m reading too much into it, but based on the past decade, I don’t think so.

Chris N said...

It would be really funny to me to see Obama get a job in the Trump administration doing PR, or become a tow truck driver in Queens, or start out with the Illinois Dept of Education and stand up to all the corruption, or have to work as a lawyer actually hustling for business.

Barry has to work a real job instead of just being poster-boy for the faculty-lounge Left.

It’s looking like foam columns all the way down.