April 6, 2018

"A lockbox instructed me to abandon my phone for the duration of the stay. There are no mirrors, I discovered."

"The survival manual encourages you to avoid emails, work, competing, planning. And – interestingly, paradoxically – suggests being bored.... That first evening we worked our way through the What Now? booklet, full of riddles and poems about the woods, and a list of questions to ask each other...."

From "Is ‘being bored’ the next travel trend for millennials?" (UK Telegraph).

@getawayhouse 👌

A post shared by Greg Dickinson (@travelographs) on

40 comments:

Achilles said...

What was old is new again.

Totally the first time we have heard this...

Seeing Red said...

Being bored or disconnected.


Like how the rest of us grew up. Or humans for millennia.

Nonapod said...

The human brain requires all sorts of stimulations and reinforcements of stimulations. Maybe modern brains may have become too accustomed to the constant minor dopemine hits, the little rewards of participating in activities like social media? Over time this cause desensitisation. Maybe "being bored" from a neurological perspective means denying oneself of those little rewards for a time. Maybe that could allow one's brain to re-sensitise?

Nah, I'm sure I'm overthinking it.

mikee said...

I, for one, think that offering the adventure traveler, day tripper, and other vacation novelty seekers a job on my construction site would be interesting for them. From cleaning up the detritus of framing, with nails sticking out of splintery wood, to carrying building supplies from curb to the second floor of the house at the back of the lot, to digging, yes, just digging holes, I can offer them things they don't normally do, that they can remember forever. I won't charge much at all, no more than a few thousand per day per person, and I provide free water and a portapotty.

traditionalguy said...

Run. Run. It's the invasion of the 200 year ago Transcendentalists recycling Thoreau, Emerson and Tennyson

chuck said...

No big trees in that photo, looks like recently overgrown farmland or pasture. Really, too many questions, the place isn't boring enough.

Sydney said...

In the old days, we used to call that going on a retreat.

tcrosse said...

In the old days, we used to call that going to jail.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

If, in such a circumstance, you are bored, it is because you are boring.

Fernandistien said...

Relaxation should be exciting.

Fernandistien said...

Excitement should be relaxing.

Sydney said...

My best vacations were spent like this. Nothing planned. Just went to bed when I was tired and woke up when I was rested. Read books, looked at a lake and the trees, listened to the birds singing. No television, no work. Very refreshing. I haven't been able to take a vacation like that in thirteen years, though. Now I have to take my work with me.

Unknown said...

Sad, in a way. Glad they are trying it out, perhaps they'll like it.

My wife and I travel internationally on occasion. Our technology is not set up for being outside the US and so we are automatically disconnected. We will tour about during the day, grab some supper, usually in a low key pub or restaurant, and then return to the place we are staying where we review the pictures taken during the day, jot down some notes and commentary, and then call it a day. Sometimes we'll read a bit before retiring, or review the plan for the next day. I am always refreshed and recharged when returning from these trips.

-sw

Ann Althouse said...

It is better than those isolation tanks.

traditionalguy said...

Or is it the FEMA Camps constructed on new Rail Lines and all set up to give disobedient Americans a final rest?

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Ann Althouse said...

It is better than those isolation tanks.

Probably better than those sweat-lodge experiences too.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Probably better than those sweat-lodge experiences too.

Although some participants did manage to get away from it all.

bagoh20 said...

I hope there is a pamphlet on pooping in the woods. And for the advanced, burying spouses.

Achilles said...

Ann Althouse said...

It is better than those isolation tanks.

Are you saying there is a difference between being free and bored and the alternative not being free and bored?

Lack of creativity and motivation is a prison too.

EDH said...

With all this talk of "Lockboxes" and boredom how far away is "Release my Chakra"?

Dust Bunny Queen said...

So....basically glorified camping.

pacwest said...

You can always daydream if you're bored.

Richard Belaire said...

These people are nuts.

tcrosse said...

Generations of European aristocrats have proven that one can be equally bored sipping champagne on the Riviera.

MadisonMan said...

That article starts with a premise that is wrong: Only boring people get bored. That's what I was always told.

I will only reply that your parents were poor parents. The proper response to I'm bored from a kid is I'm not here to undo that or So go find something to do.

madAsHell said...

I used to make forts out of cardboard boxes, and blankets. I guess some folks never out grow that notion.

William said...

I remember boredom. Sunday afternoon was the worst. The way the light slanted through the window blinds . Even the light was boring. The Sunday papers were scattered on the floor. You reread the funnies and picked through the Sunday supplement to find some morsel of interest to relieve the tedium.......The world's now a better place. Some moments are more entertaining than others, but boredom is pretty easy to duck. Back then it was a heavy part of existence, and no one looked upon boredom as a goal or as a means to achieving fulfillment.

Ann Althouse said...

I suspect a picture window looking out on some trees seems very inspiring to people who live somewhere that’s noisy and dark and choatic. Are there good walks and trails around it, or is it all about sitting in a box?

I’ve lived for a long time with big windows looking out on trees. It’s normal life, but if it wasn’t mine, I’d pay for the chance to live like this for a couple weeks.

Rick Turley said...

Oh, for a place where a man can relax!
No cell phone
No email.
No pager.
No fax....

Or something like that.

iowan2 said...

Most relaxing and fun, was renting a houseboat on Lake of the Ozarks with 3 other couples. It takes the right mix of people, those who dont operate on feelings about what others might think...about anything. Each couple was responsible for one supper. Then you did what you wanted or not. Read, ski, float in the lake and drink, nothing. No cell towers or TV. Jump in the ski boat at 4:00 for happy hour on shore,(or not), 4 days like that and we were recharged

iowan2 said...

suspect a picture window looking out on some trees seems very inspiring to people who live somewhere that’s noisy and dark and choatic.

When driving around Germany for 4 days, I noticed buildings about the size of a 2 car garage, out in agriculture land. Not woods or meadow, ag fields, I started asking about them, and was told that city folks came out to spend weekends there. Just someplace to be other that the city. Not for me, but then I'm not 4th generation city dweller. I'm 4th generation farm family, so we go "into Town" for a weekend away

tcrosse said...

Someplace dark and chaotic would be Washington DC in the Hundred Year Night of the Trump Administration.

Assistant Village Idiot said...

No children, I notice. Is reading not part of the program?

I also noticed the young trees of similar age. I would likely want to go outside and walk around, read the landscape history as best I could guess. I like just thinking, usually need something to get me started, or I just go to the same old ruts.

rehajm said...

It’s normal life, but if it wasn’t mine, I’d pay for the chance to live like this for a couple weeks.

When youl live in a high rise you miss trees. I have a patio with planters and a birch tree in a container. It’s been visited by a woodpecker and sobgbirds over the years, but you still miss trees.

wildswan said...

I have a view like that "boring" view but better? because it includes more kinds of trees and better birds than starlings? However I've never been able to monetize? it and, as it's Wisconsin, I think? I never will. But it's an insight into how the poor young Millenials? live to realize that they are paying to have everything taken away except? a similar view. Mine? has chipmunks, too. and flowers? Too much action?, perhaps for overstimulated snowflakes, though I often find it all - boring? however much I like? it. Question marks mean I'm making my voice go up? for no reason? like a Millenial? staring out at. trees?

Art in LA said...

I want to live right on the edge of boredom all the time!

robother said...

Good to see someone found a use for Al Gore's lockbox. No surprise it involves boredom.

PB said...

If it takes that for you to disconnect then you are a meat puppet with recessive genes

Nancy Reyes said...

heh. we get this for free in the Philippines, when the typhoons take out our electricity etc.

But you know, as soon as we got our generator running, all the neighbors came to charge their cellphones up: mainly to text their relatives that they were okay.

Peter Malloy said...

To them, being bored just means not having your phone.