January 2, 2018

Up at 4, enjoying the setting of the supermoon.

Lots of beautiful pictures of it here.

I don't think I can get a good picture through the windows, and it's -5° so I don't really want to step out onto the deck.

But from my desk in front of a wall of windows, I'm getting hours of predawn supermoon right at my shoulder.

12 comments:

Bob R said...

I agree, not going out to look. (It's 4 degrees here - balmy from your perspective.) But it's very bright, I assume because it's so cold out there is no water vapor in the air to distort it.

Michael K said...

The photographers' names are also interesting.

I kept looking at each photo to see the name.

Big Mike said...

Is this a cafe thread where we can muse on the fact that SEC basically did very poorly in the bowl games (did the Gamecocks win or did the Maize and Blue lose?) yet it will be Georgia versus ‘Bama next Monday for all the marbles?

traditionalguy said...

A Red Moon rising. This portends Evil Kirby Smart overthrowing Nick Saban.

Original Mike said...

"But it's very bright, I assume because it's so cold out there is no water vapor in the air to distort it."

Yes, atmospheric transparency is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor.

Henry said...

I love the moonlight on the fields and woods around our home.

Michael McNeil said...

Precisely 1 lunar month from today — on January 31, 2018 (01/31/2018) at 13:30 UT (07:30 a.m. CST in the USA), just before dawn in the far west of North America — there will be, not a mere “supermoon,” but a total eclipse of the moon!

In addition to the spectacle of the “totality” stage of a lunar eclipse, the “partial” phases of such an eclipse are also extremely interesting: At such times one can directly see the curvature of the earth (the shape of earth's shadow or “umbra”) marching across the face of the moon — exactly as if the image of the earth were being projected onto a gigantic projection screen — which it actually is! The moon being that projection screen.

This particular lunar eclipse will be visible from the western U.S. and Canada — along with Siberia (eastern Russia), Japan, the Koreas, Taiwan, China, Nepal, eastern India, Bangladesh, southeast Asia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand — together with the assorted nations of the broad Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia regions sprawling across most of the Pacific.

This map graphically shows where the eclipse will be visible. You in Wisconsin might be able to catch it just as the full moon sets in the west….

Deja Voodoo said...

Watching the Wolf Moon in the Hour of the Wolf. (N.B.: I lived in Sweden in the 50s, Bergman's film title was a familiar locution there)
I'm usually up at O-dark-forty-five, and it was nice to see the full moonlight streaming through my neighbors leafless tree onto my patio as I let my dog out.

Rick Turley said...

Living out near the woods, we have no need for window treatments due to neighbors or keeping out the light. But every once in a while, like last night, I wish we had some. Dang was it bright in the bedroom early this morning. Didn't even need the iPhone to light to way to the bathroom.

Yancey Ward said...

I got a great look at the moon just before I went to bed early this morning- wish I had taken a look earlier when it was on the horizon.

Roger Sweeny said...

Coming home from some friends yesterday, we made a turn and, Wow! There it was, completely unexpected, barely above the horizon, and amazingly big and bright.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Hey McNeil,


of the broad Melanesia,


What did you just call the First Lady?!