December 27, 2017

Puzzlingly violent illustration on NYT op-ed criticizing Trump's judicial nominees.

What is this supposed to mean?



I haven't read the column yet. What I see in the the illustration (which is by Chris Kindred) is a large hammer — a judge's gavel — slamming into a man's face and cracking it up. The cracked up face seems to have been fragmented even before the hammer hit. Perhaps the pre-smash fragment is intended to look like the state of Kentucky. The man seems to have the Confederate stars and bars in one eye, and he has some other symbol in front of his other eye, perhaps crossed swords or some kind of cross. I simply do not understand connecting the idea of face-shattering with this issue. Who is supposed to be wielding the gavel?

The column is titled "William Barber II: Trump’s Terrible Choice for Judge," so I'm guessing the man with the shattered face is William Barber II, and the idea is that he's a Trump nominee and he's terrible, presumably because of something connected to the Confederacy. I suppose the column argues that he shouldn't be confirmed, but does that mean he should be bashed in the face with a hammer? Why would you want to associate your opinion with murderous violence?

Now, who's the author of this piece? Oh! It's William Barber II. He's not "Trump’s Terrible Choice for Judge." Somebody else is. Ha ha. Eventually, I'm going to read this piece, but I've gone from being outraged by the depiction of violence to amused by the horribly ambiguous headline.

All right. I'm reading it. The "terrible" nominee is Thomas Alvin Farr, and he's from North Carolina, so that shape really is a state, and the shattering interfered with my state-shape perceptions. The "tails" — the unshattered parts — are very similar. The front ends differ, but North Carolina is the one with the straight-edge on top. Kentucky has the straight-edge on the bottom.

Barber connects Farr to Jesse Helms and Helms to "white supremacist causes." Helms was a Senator from 1973 to 2003, and you can look at his long career and pick out some terrible things (and also some good things), but the question now is what do we think of Farr?
When Mr. Farr graduated from law school, Mr. Helms and [lawyer Thomas] Ellis brought him into their fold. Mr. Farr joined the small law firm of Maupin, Taylor & Ellis, where all of the named partners were openly hostile to civil rights....

Most recently, Mr. Farr has carried on Mr. Helms’s legacy by helping North Carolina’s Republican-led Legislature create and defend in court discriminatory voting restrictions and electoral districts, which were eventually struck down by numerous federal courts that found them to be motivated by intentional racism. In fact, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit found that the state’s 2013 voter suppression law was aimed at blacks with “almost surgical precision.”
Put on that abstract level, it does indeed sound terrible, but a balanced presentation would specify that the subject is mostly voter I.D. laws, which have been upheld by the Supreme Court. It will be interesting to see whether the confirmation hearings on Farr will rest heavily on the voter I.D. issue. Polls have long shown that the great majority of Americans support voter I.D. laws. But you can tell all these people they're racists — deplorables! — and see how that works.
Senators from both sides of the aisle must condemn the experience Mr. Farr brings with him... Every senator who condemned the racism on display in Charlottesville must vote to prevent it from having power in the federal judiciary.
So the illustration means that the Senate holds the gavel and it "must" smash Thomas Alvin Farr in the face with it. I understand it now. It's very crude, violent, and ugly. And somebody at the NYT decided it belonged on that column.

57 comments:

wendybar said...

Typical left wing dribble. That's why we laugh at the NYT!!

Bay Area Guy said...

The Left: if you are against a multi-cultural, multi-ethic society, including unlimited legal and illegal immigration, then you are a "white supremacist"

Hagar said...

Anytime you see "with almost surgical precision," stop reading and pass on to the next article.

Lem said...

Antifa occupies the NYT?

I don’t know if I should be mad or glad.

Michael K said...

TDS in pictures for those who need more than words.

Earnest Prole said...

Advice to the New York Times: Be careful what you wish for.

Krumhorn said...

...by any means necessary

- Krumhorn

james james said...

Headlines that tell you how to feel in the first post today, illustrations that tell you how to react in this post. And, of course, the media's photo choices do this, too.

Emotional Cues, so you don't even have to bother reading the articles.

Perhaps the NYT et al. should just start putting Emojis atop their material, so you can get through the day's news in five minutes or less.

Trump = Frowny Face.

Trump = KKK Hood.

Trump = Sad Swastika.

Trump = Turd.

Deplorables = Turd with Orange Hair.

- james james

Paco Wové said...

Wikipedia article (probably added by a fan) on William Barber II, for those (like me) whose reaction was, "Who...?"

Ron Winkleheimer said...

But you can tell all these people they're racists — deplorables! — and see how that works.

A few years ago the local paper had a drive to get back former subscribers. So the subscription department called and offered six weeks of the paper for free so I could see that reading the paper was worthwhile. I agreed. The first paper was delivered and I opened it to the opinion page and read the opinion column concerning the SC case where Shelby County AL was challenging the consent decree issued 50 years before. None of the actual issues regarding the case were addressed. That the data used to garner the consent decree was 50 years old and their was no evidence that the county was currently discriminating. Not a word about the fact that the if the county should suddenly start discriminating then the Justice Dept. could do the same thing it does in county's' that don't have a consent decree, take it to court and challenge the discrimination. Not a word about the fact that if the Justice Dept. could come up with data showing current discriminatory practices then the consent decree could be reimposed. Nope, the "argument" was that white flight from Birmingham and Jefferson County had led to all the racists moving to Shelby County and that the people in Shelby County were all a bunch of racists. The sad thing is that the people who put together that "argument" thought it actually was an argument and that it would be persuasive.

I threw the paper in the recycle bin and didn't even bother to take the following papers out of their protective plastic bags.

Fernandistein said...

It's very crude, violent, and ugly.

The illustrator is an affirmative action hire.

But you can tell all these people they're racists

The author is also an affirmative action hire, is a member of a black-supremacist racist group, and a professional peddler of superstition.

MayBee said...

Hahaha this post is great.

Michelle Dulak Thomson said...

What's with the "II," anyway? I thought the style was: "Jr." if "Sr." is still living, and "III" if Jr. and Sr. are both still living. Perhaps William Barrett doesn't like being called a Junior anything.

Ron Winkleheimer, the easy and obvious solution to the consent-decree mess is to extend it to all counties everywhere in the US. As it is, fifty years on, it's still a fork in the eye of the South, which is hardly the only region prone to anti-black voter intimidation. I don't see why (say) Houston needs to apply for permission every time it moves a polling place, while (say) Boston may do whatever it damn well pleases.

Saint Croix said...

I thought the "surgical precision" was maybe in regard to drawing voting districts in North Carolina. We've had some wacky ones.

But the big deal was they overturned the voter ID law a few years ago. One year I had to show my driver's license and the next year I didn't. You can read about the case here.

The Supreme Court has upheld voter ID laws. So to overturn a voter ID law, you basically have to hold that the people who wrote the law have a racist intent.

Darrell said...

The Left has spoken.
OBEY.

Martin said...

The NYT expresses murderous sentiments against Trump and many Republicans, and has so ever since Pinch took over 20+ years ago. This is not new.

MayBee said...

What's with the "II," anyway? I thought the style was: "Jr." if "Sr." is still living, and "III" if Jr. and Sr. are both still living. Perhaps William Barrett doesn't like being called a Junior anything.

Or II if you are named after someone in your family, but not your father. For example, if a boy is named after his grandfather. Grandson would be a II not a Jr.

David Begley said...

The ABA, Dems and MSM couldn’t stop Steve Grasz of Nebraska from getting confirmed to the 8th Circuit so this guy is the next target.

Crank up the rhetoric!

Unknown said...

It is supposed to mean and is proganda. That is what the NYTime is, anpropaganda arm to the democrat-media party.

Katherine said...

Barber is famous, or infamous, in North Carolina. He organized the "Moral Monday" protests, in which the legislature was regularly prevented from conducting ordinary business because, he said, the Republicans in charge are all racists, no matter what the legislation at hand. Now he's trying to become famous, or infamous, nationally. He's got an ego as large as he is (and that's huge).

The notorious I-85 legislative district was constructed by Democrats when they were in power, and only became objectionable when Republican redistricting allegedly shoved a few too many minority voters into it. Republicans responded to the lawsuit by constructing new districts which do not take account of race at all, and of course to the left, that's awful too.

The Fourth Circuit's outrageous decision led to the situation where it's "racist" in North Carolina to ask for a voter ID under a law which was carefully drawn to make all sorts of allowances for people without regular driver's licenses, but in Virginia immediately to our north it's not racist to require a photo ID at the polls.

tola'at sfarim said...

Jake tapper hardest hit

Saint Croix said...

Barber is famous, or infamous, in North Carolina.

Maybe in Raleigh.

He's still a nobody in Charlotte.

Katherine said...

Good to know Barber is nobody in Charlotte. He should be a nobody nationwide. Self-promotion is his creed.

Michelle Dulak Thomson said...

Ah, MayBee. Thanks! I'd forgotten that.

NorthOfTheOneOhOne said...

Katherine said...
Barber is famous, or infamous, in North Carolina. He organized the "Moral Monday" protests, in which the legislature was regularly prevented from conducting ordinary business because, he said, the Republicans in charge are all racists, no matter what the legislation at hand.

And, lest we forget, Barber fought tooth and nail to keep Bussing alive in Wake Co., long after (we're talking mid 2000's here) the Supreme Court had ruled it unconstitutional.

Francisco D said...

TDS in pictures for those who have problems with reading comprehension and analytical reasoning.

Rick Turley said...

Pffft! We've had a Supreme Court justice who was a member of the KKK, appointed by a saint of a Democrat President.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/supreme-court-justice-was-kkk-member-180962254/

Saint Croix said...

Good to know Barber is nobody in Charlotte.

We had a race riot in Charlotte. If you're going to follow in Dr. King's footsteps, you have to avoid race riots.

At the time, we had a black President, a black mayor, and a black chief of police. Maybe that's why he wasn't involved? Anyway, he was pretty much a no-show when the riot came to town. Which is a shame. Maybe he could have stopped it or kept it non-violent.

I wish he would focus more on Christianity and less on racial politics.

On Maundy Thursday they chose to cripple voting rights..

That's a pretty good line. Over the top, maybe a little blasphemous, but also sharp and strong.

EDH said...

Here's my guess:

In the NYT duality, the image is supposed to be a mirror.

The graphic askes the question: is that the image of their state they want reflected with the appointment of this judge?

Or do "we" rise up and smash that with the gavel in the hand of the people?

tcrosse said...

They should stick with crosshairs.

SeanF said...

Michelle Dulak Thomson: What's with the "II," anyway? I thought the style was: "Jr." if "Sr." is still living, and "III" if Jr. and Sr. are both still living.

Unless I'm mistaken, the "official" distinction is that "junior" is used when the son has the same name as the father, and "II" is used when the son has the same name as another, older relative (grandfather, uncle, etc.) but different than the father.

However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior."

MayBee said...

However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior.

He's whatever his parents put on his birth certificate.

Josephbleau said...

A minor point but the “stars and bars” flag has three horizontal stripes, red, white, red with a blue field containing a circle of stars. Different f rom the battle flag of the army of northern va, a blue St. George’s Cross with stars on a red background. But it is probably racist to note that.

Josephbleau said...

Actually a blue St. Andrew’s Cross, to confess my error.

Bad Lieutenant said...


MayBee said...
However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior.

He's whatever his parents put on his birth certificate.

12/27/17, 9:42 AM


Am I crazy or do many blacks, consciously or unconsciously, seem to like to either flout or botch the standard naming conventions?

Michael K said...

18-year-old De’asia Page, asked Abad for a ride.

You mean like De'asia ?

Ralph L said...

The notorious I-85 legislative district was constructed by Democrats when they were in power
IIRC, the original in the early 90's was done by Republicans to create a safe black seat to please the US DoJ. Of course, that created several safe Repub seats, too.

It looks likes the gavel is hitting Smithfield, Ava Gardner's hometown, so the NYT is sexist, too.

Why was our voter ID law "worse" than other states'?

Ralph L said...

like to either flout or botch the standard naming conventions?
Aping royalty? Prince Michael II.

Ralph L said...

Oh dear, used "aping". I denounce myself.

hawkeyedjb said...

You should put up a link to Buwaya's explanation of the "voter suppression" techniques in effect in the Philippines, and how it reduced participation to -what?- 80% or so.

Katherine said...

The problem is that for the Rev. Barber, Christianity and racial politics are the same thing.

Gahrie said...

However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior.

Not necessarily. his parents could have been idiots (harsh I know...but we're talking decades of annoyance here) like mine. I have the same first name as my father, and the same middle initial, but different middle name. (mine is Patrick, his is Phillip)

So I have the same first and last name, and middle initial as my father, but I am not a junior. our mail gets confused, our credit report gets confused etc. (It doesn't help that I own a home he used to own with the same phone number he used to have)

David-2 said...

"However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior.""

He self-identifies as a "II", you deadnaming racist.

Gordon Scott said...

@josephbleau: Since you have an affinity for flag heraldry, you should appreciate this:

https://tinyurl.com/yd3akaqt

Scroll a bit more than halfway down to see Rebel in various styles.

Regular comics having become unreadable due to social justice, a new company has been formed and will start distribution in early 2018. One of the superhero characters is Rebel, a good Southern girl who fights evil. She made her own costume, of course, being a Southern girl. But those straps keep untying themselves.

n.n said...

Multi-trillion dollar welfare economy.

Excessive immigration "reform".

Civil rights are denied through a preponderance of allegations and witch hunts. Under a progressive layer of [color] diversity (e.g. racism) advocated by special and peculiar interests.

Democracy dies without integrity, under a layer of privacy in a baby trial.

To think that Wisconsin may have been the proving ground for Democrat abuse, which progressed under the Obasma/Clinton/DNC/Press collusion with foreign intelligence assets and sovereign (e.g. Kiev) aid.

#NoExcuses

Rick67 said...

The author engages in a rhetorical tactic I see increasingly.

Portray something (that is still controversial but perhaps less so) in "unbalanced" terms so that it sounds stupid or venal. Persist in discussing that something solely in those terms without going back to what that something truly is without all the "unbalanced" editorializing.

This judge supports racist policies that target black! Venal! Hulk smash!

This judge supports laws to prevent fraudulent voting - laws that the Supreme Court has upheld. Oh. Hulk drink tea.

I happen to support voter ID laws. Fortunately I have a track record that would undermine attempts to charge me with racist intent.

Anonymous said...

The fragment is shaped sort of like North Carolina, but does not resemle Kentucky at all. And as an earlier commenter noted, the "Stars and Bars" is the original flag of the Confederacy, and not the battle flag with the saltire (the "x"). The battle flag came into use during the war because the "Stars and Bars" looked too much like the US flag on smoky, dusty battlefields.

rhhardin said...

The picture needs cross-hairs.

Cgage said...

Donald's Silver Hammer?

Steve Black said...

I'm glad you read this stuff so I don't have to.

I'm a native North Carolinian and voted for the first time in 1976. Jesse Helms stirred tremendous passion in just about every citizen of the state, either for or against him, while he was Senator. Carol Moseley Braun once accused him of whistling "Dixie" as they rode in one of Senate elevators together. Having been associated with him is definitely a big deal for many people.

Jim at said...

The Left has spoken.
OBEY.


#notme

Big Mike said...

However, it appears that William J. Barber II is in fact William J. Barber's son, so he should be "Junior.

Silly me. I was taught that William J. Barber Jr. became William J. Barber II after there was a William K. Barber III. (The son will be nicknamed “Trip.”)

buwaya said...

"You should put up a link to Buwaya's explanation of the "voter suppression" techniques in effect in the Philippines, and how it reduced participation to -what?- 80% or so."

Yes. No need for an explanation I think.

Election security measures are a set of international best-practices that the US government supports outside the US. Even when Democrats were in charge of the USG.
State Department people and specialists from various US think-tanks and universities are happy to tell foreigners how to run elections.

But in the US these experts do not operate. The squeezing out of an extra 1% turnout among those who aren't enthusiastic about voting in the first place matters more. It is gamesmanship that would be just the sort of thing all these experts would complain about among foreigners.

The way to 80% turnouts is through public education that sells citizenship as both a right and a duty; open and honest debate and genuine options; a mass media that has all points of view; and a politics that is, on the whole, something other than disingenuous and hypocritical. The Philippines manages all this, in spite of poverty, corruption, multiple languages, tribalism, dispersion among islands, and a host of other troubles.

Daniel Jackson said...

French Functionaries (generally lefties) mail out to each citizen an "Electoral Card" that authorizes the citizen to vote in an election. A separate entity altogether from one's identity card. If you lose the card or never received it, you cannot vote. You have to get it replaced after the election.

Think of it as a voter ID card.

I have no problem presenting a voter registration card when I go to vote or the NEED for one. This is another incongruity the US Lefties that leaves me confounded and speechless.

Certainly it cannot be that they want to stuff the ballot box?

Dickin'Bimbos@Home said...

The left like to cheat and lie - then run and hide behind the skirt of faux racism.

walter said...

When all you have is a gavel, everything looks like...

Mountain Maven said...

Incoherent, Ann