September 3, 2017

Lavender.

11 comments:

3rdGradePB_GoodPerson said...

"lavender capital of North America"

http://www.lavenderfestival.com

We also refer to Sequim as "God's waiting room:" plenty of temporally experienced guys and dolls 'round there.

3rdGradePB_GoodPerson said...

Speaking of lavender, Althouse should join the red hat gang of old ladies who wear purple clothes.

Marc Puckett said...

One of the pleasures of my daily walks is passing by a house where there are some score of lavender plants situated between the fence and the sidewalk. The householder has harvested now, of course.

Don't think that the idea of a lavender martini sounds very appetizing.

Ann Althouse said...

"Wisconsin Life" is my favorite TV show.

Birkel said...

https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=9697

Hey, look. It seems Benoit College (or at least one professor and the other professors who approved this new course) thinks “All Monuments Must Fall.”

The slope, she is slippery.

(Apologies if this was not an open thread.)

Paco Wové said...

Looks pretty open to me. I'll just use that as an excuse to leave a link to "a broody love letter of baby pining and sex fantasy", as one Sailer commenter put it, and back away quietly.

David said...

This is one of two Lavender Farms on Washington Island. The other, Island Lavender, is the original operation. The lady in the video worked at Island Lavender before acquiring a property about a mile away and going into competition with Island Lavender.

It's unfortunate that this public television show, though charmingly presented, does not acknowledge both operations. Both appear to be doing well. My wife works for Island Lavender during the summer and enjoys the job. She works at Island Lavender's store/production facility at the Red Barn in northern Ephraim on the Door County mainland.

The lady in the video is correct that lavender cultivation and product production is labor intensive hand work. Reliable labor is in very short supply in Door County, especially in summer. The availability of labor is likely to become a major challenge for both enterprises.

Ann Althouse said...

@David

What is wrong with competition? Was there an agreement not to compete? If one farmer's operation shows that a particular crop will do well in a place, is it unfair for someone else to grow the same thing?

"Wisconsin Life" does romanticize what one person is doing, and one thing we like about watching the show is talking about it afterwards, often speculating about what is left out or what the other sides to the story are.

Ann Althouse said...

""Wisconsin Life" does romanticize what one person is doing..."

I can see how this will tend to focus on photogenic people who come across as warm, delightful, and happy, like this woman with her lovely French accent, which has me now pronouncing the word "lavender" the way she does.

The show makes everything seem disconnected from economics and about personal satisfaction and love. It's a type of pornography really. Someone who's oriented toward the bottom line and cranky and unhappy about the work would never make it onto "Wisconsin Life." I enjoy the fantasy (even as I also enjoy talking about how it is a fantasy).

This segment portrays farm work as a beautiful avocation, something that you might want to do in retirement. Meade sometimes talks about doing something like that. But it's a farm, and I think farm work is happiest when contemplated from a distance.

FleetUSA said...

Parfait, Madame. Quelle plaisir.

BJM said...

Lavender farming may not be a wise investment, given the EU's regulation of Lavender as a toxic substance