September 10, 2017

At the Little Red Café...



... what have you got in that basket?

The image of Little Red Riding Hood is from Carl Larsson, 1881. See the previous post to know why I'd wandered onto that Wikipedia page. If you're going to say anything Hillary-Clinton-related, please go to that post and knock yourself out. This is, with that one restriction, an open thread.

And what a big portal I have here, at Amazon.

106 comments:

tcrosse said...

Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs chime in from the mists of the distant past.

Little Red Riding Hood

frak said...

What a beautiful painting from another age. Would be lovely in a child's room, at least in a circa 1950s bedroom long ago when i was growing up. Love the bare footed innocence and the looming malevolence. I fear not for the little girl who looks capable of charming the wolf into rolling over for a tummy rub.

Ann Althouse said...

Which illustration is better, this one or the Rackham one in the previous post? I love them both, but I thought the Rackham one was better art. This one, I think, draws you in psychologically. It might be too sentimental, but since it's a children's story, it gets a pass.

Quaestor said...

What the heck is a riding hood? Evidently, Larsson did know either because Lil' Red is wearing a hat, not a hood.

Ann Althouse said...

Here's how Gustave Doré handled the same scene.

Ann Althouse said...

"What the heck is a riding hood? Evidently, Larsson did know either because Lil' Red is wearing a hat, not a hood."

If you click on the Wikipedia link, you'll see the story is also sometimes "Little Red Cap."

Doré also has the girl with a cap.

(We've already had a discussion of the difference between a hat and a cap, but you can look that up.)

Ann Althouse said...

Little Red Cap

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

Once upon a time there was a sweet little girl. Everyone who saw her liked her, but most of all her grandmother, who did not know what to give the child next. Once she gave her a little cap made of red velvet. Because it suited her so well, and she wanted to wear it all the time, she came to be known as Little Red Cap.

One day her mother said to her, "Come Little Red Cap. Here is a piece of cake and a bottle of wine. Take them to your grandmother. She is sick and weak, and they will do her well. Mind your manners and give her my greetings. Behave yourself on the way, and do not leave the path, or you might fall down and break the glass, and then there will be nothing for your grandmother. And when you enter her parlor, don't forget to say 'Good morning,' and don't peer into all the corners first."

"I'll do everything just right," said Little Red Cap, shaking her mother's hand.

The grandmother lived out in the woods, a half hour from the village. When Little Red Cap entered the woods a wolf came up to her. She did not know what a wicked animal he was, and was not afraid of him....

Ann Althouse said...

So much for "goodies." Grandma was getting cake and wine!

Quaestor said...

And the engraver knows less about hoods than the painter. Another hat. Doré's Big Bad is bigger and badder, which is to be expected from someone who made a fortune illustrating horrors.

I've never quite understood Big Bad's nefarious plan. He knows the way to Grandma's house better than Lil' Red, then why not eat her first as an appetizer and then proceed to Grandma's for the main course? Pretending to be Grandma is just a waste of precious energy. Predators should avoid such trifles.

traditionalguy said...

The National Anthem at the Bears/Falcons game was powerfully sung by Jim Cornelion with a huge B-2 Bomber fly over. Impressive stuff.TCU and UGA both won hard games yesterday, so the Falcons need to add the trifecta.

The locals in Atlanta are shutting down everything tomorrow. You would think a big thunderstorm would not freak out folks here.

tcrosse said...

In the Rackham, the tree gets all the best lines.

Quaestor said...

Grandma was getting cake and wine!

Excellent goodies! Depending on the wine of course. The Danes don't know wine from soup, so it might not be too good after all.

Hagar said...

Your post below about Hitler's art has disappeared.

Hagar said...

That is, the comment section has vanished.

Michael said...

Hurricane Jose is aimed at D.C. and NYC two places never meant to be inhabited.

Roughcoat said...

What happened to the Clooney / Hitler / Bannon thread???

Quaestor said...

The National Anthem at the Bears/Falcons game was powerfully sung by Jim Cornelion with a huge B-2 Bomber fly over.

That's the NFL trying to paper over the Kaepernick imbroglio, a bleeding wound that has reduced revenues to everyone concerned expect the players who are entirely responsible for the loss. I would advise not falling for that malarky. Dr. Johnson knew nothing about football, but that fly-over was an example of what he had in mind when he told Boswell about patriotism and scoundrels. If the League was truly an organization of patriots rather than plutocrats they wouldn't allow ESPN, a network only slightly to the right of MSNBC, to air their games.

Hagar said...

We are now all on someone's shit list, if we were not already.

J. Farmer said...

Hmm...the Clooney/Bannon post seems to have gone into a blackhole. Pity, I was enjoying the discussion regarding WWI.

rhhardin said...

There was another X9 (big) solar xray flare. They're pretty rare usually and we've had a cluster of them.

exiledonmainstreet said...

tcrosse, there is another YouTube video featuring Sam the Sham's great song and a disturbingly weird Betty Boop cartoon from the '30's. Neither song nor cartoon could be produced today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JOwxnVoG6Q

Etienne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Hagar said...

Althouse has finally made it to Google's "hate group" list?

Lucien said...

Who are the people out there who really wanted to see nine days of coverage of a hurricane that was going to make landfall on day 10? I could learn all the information useful to me in 3-5 minutes plus 30-second updates as to where the storm was heading.

Had I lived in the affected area, the information I'd want: what roads & bridges were open, etc., would be available through local news, and certainly not from CNN, et al.
Yes, bit hurricanes are news, especially when they haven't hit the country in a dozen years or so, but the world is full of other news stories. Study the world!

exiledonmainstreet said...

I like the colors in the Larsson painting more. But both are beautiful.

The story of Little Red Riding Hood dates from a time when wolf attacks on rural peasants were not unheard of.

Michael K said...


The story of Little Red Riding Hood dates from a time when wolf attacks on rural peasants were not unheard of.


The original version ended with the wolf eating LRRH. It was cleaned up as a fairy tale. Like a lot of fairy tales.

Hansel and Gretel was based on the practice of peasants leaving children in the woods to starve if they could not afford to feed them in bad harvest years,.

Michael K said...

".the Clooney/Bannon post seems to have gone into a blackhole"

I was posting a comment and got an error message and the whole thing vanished.

Hagar said...

Hitler = Robert E. Lee

Michael K said...

Why not continue it here ?

The comment that killed the post was to the effect that I blame the Kaiser for the war.

His father Frederick, was an Anglophile and married Victoria's oldest daughter. He developed cancer of the larynx and his wife insisted on a English doctor who was inept and they ignored better train German surgeons. He could have been cured, possibly with the loss of his voice. The result was the death of Frederick and hatred by Wilhelm for all his English cousins.

He built the High Seas Fleet (Well described in "Dreadnaught") and the Germans had no good reason as they had no large colonial system. It was a challenge to the English.

The French were also mischievous and wanted revenge for 1870 but the English were only involved because of Wilhelm.

Etienne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Etienne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
William said...

The Google people are pushing for a Clooney presidency. Critical pieces about Clooney will not survive long on the internet.

buwaya said...

Me too (posting then got gone).
Oh well, this is a transient and dynamic medium.

To switch analogies, 1930s German politics aside, the German military establishment under the Versailles treaty, from 1918 on, was a wolf making like grandma.

A point I recall about post-Versailles is that a lot of the reluctance to come down too hard on Germany as far as enforcement was the fear of the Bolsheviks and the Soviet Union. In the critical years, 1919-21, the threat of military invasion and revolution was clear, and the Western All ies put a lot of effort at saving Poland from the Soviets. The list of big names mixed up in Poland at the time is quite astonishing.

David said...

Nice doggie . . .

Quaestor said...

The Monsters of Gévaudan is an interesting read on the subject of wolves and France in the 18th century written by a professor of French history at UNC. There have been a number of sensational books and TV documentaries offering theories about the Beast as something foreign to Europe, a hyena perhaps. Some have even suggested the deaths were, in fact, serial murders committed by someone in control of an exotic predator.

Smith points out that none of the professional hunters dispatched by the government to kill the Beast had any doubt of the identity of the killer — common wolves, Canis lupus. France has some pretty wild countryside, particularly in the Massif Central and the Dordogne. It was even more desolate in the 1700s. Wolves are seen there even today. One contributing factor to the string of human killings may have been war. The incidents happened during the Seven Years War, a struggle fought on four continents and three oceans. France was pushed to the brink of collapse by the effort to support Austria against Prussia and simultaneously to defend her colonies against the British. Tens of thousands of farm boys were recruited to fight, thus reducing agricultural output. The food demands of the French forces depleted livestock. Furthermore, the harsh winters and wet summers that finally drove the French to revolutionary action began during the period of the Gévaudan killings. The wolves of rural France suffered starvation, which made them unusually aggressive toward humans — women and children particularly, the easier prey.

William said...

George Clooney is the greatest actor of his generation and will someday make a fine President. If you preface your remarks about Clooney in such a way, you can outwit the algorithm and then go on to say that Clooney is a smug bastard and as useless as tits on a Batman costume. At least for now. They're constantly perfecting the Clooney algorithm.

Ann Althouse said...

"Your post below about Hitler's art has disappeared. That is, the comment section has vanished."

Thanks. I see something I did, mishandling open window. I will be able to restore the post with comments. That is, I have the comments, but not, currently, the text of the post. Hmm. Will figure something out.

Ann Althouse said...

There! I fixed it.

Thanks for the prompt. I might never have noticed.

William said...

The German General Staff accomplished the trifecta: they lost WWI, subsidized Lenin and the Bolsheviks, and, under Hindenburg, allowed Hitler to assume the Chancellorship. They could have kept England out of the war by the simple expedient of not invading Belgium. They thought they would overrun France before the British could get involved. They could have kept America out of the war by not resorting to unlimited submarine warfare. Here again, they thought they would have won in France before America could get involved. Dumfupf should be a German word used to describe them.....,,,Even where they won, they screwed up. On the eastern front, where they did win, they demanded huge chunks of Russian territory which had to be garrisoned by German troops. They actually had a net loss of troops after their victory,.. ..Hitler had been convicted of a felony. Under the German constitution Hindenburg could have denied Hitler the Chancellor's office .......The German generals knew far more about warfare than statecraft.

Ann Althouse said...

Nothing nefarious happened. I just had an open window with nothing in it that was an earlier version of what was the post. I must have saved it as a draft and cause caused the post to be updated into nothing and an unpublished draft (but with 91 comments preserved). By finding a cache of the published post, I could copy the text into that saved draft, reinsert the photo and the links, and publish.

The disappearance had nothing to do with the happenstance of Hitler's presence in the post!

Hagar said...

Disappointing. I was so looking forward to Althouse going to war!

Michael K said...

All good points, William although the Kaiser, by not directly challenging England with the High Seas Fleet, could have kept them an ally.

They had been an enemy of France for centuries. England's traditional ally had been Prussia, not France.

Quaestor said...

He built the High Seas Fleet (Well described in "Dreadnaught")

One of my favorite popular histories on the subject. Everyone should read that book before advancing an opinion on the Great War.

Another point about the German navy — endurance. British warships were intended to police a worldwide empire, consequently, all her warships, even the dreadnaughts, had the ability to stay at sea for many weeks, even months. When British super-dreadnaughts were built to use bunker oil rather than coal endurance increased again. The Germans had essentially two fleets — a rather modest flotilla of cruisers able to range across the globe and the High Seas Fleet, a force of dreadnaughts, battlecruisers, and destroyers designed for action in the North Sea. A typical German capital ship was more heavily armored and carried more guns than a British warship of comparable tonnage. Those attributes were purchased at the cost of crew berthing space and stores. High Seas Fleet typically lived in barracks and embarked only for brief periods. More than two weeks at sea would put the crew on a diet of biscuit and rusty water. German battleships had but one mission, to fight and destroy the Royal Navy in the North Sea. It was incapable of anything else. Thus it was when Emperor William II told British journalists that his fleet would help the British guarantee free commerce on the sea the British public knew he was lying.

Defenders of Germany make much of the fact that the Kaiser made a considerable effort to prevent war between Russia and Austria in the last week of July 1914, which is true. However, during the war itself, a number of peace feelers went out from the neutral powers, chiefly Sweden, Holland, and the United States, Germany indicated she was flexible on certain points but insisted on keeping Belgium as a dependency of the German Empire, and they never waived on that demand until the final armistice negotiation in 1918. The Entente was mostly amenable to a peace based on the status quo ante bellum, especially after 1917 when a desperate France started to regard national survival as preferable to a regained Alsace-Lorraine. The Central Powers insisted on territorial concessions right up to the end. Understandable perhaps in the case of Austria-Hungary with her long border with the treacherous Serbs, but not understanable at all in the case of German demands on neutral Belgium.

exiledonmainstreet said...

Thanks for the recommendation, Quaestor. That looks like a really interesting read.

Quaestor said...

typo correction: High Seas Fleet seamen typically lived in barracks and embarked only for brief periods. More than two weeks at sea would put the crew on a diet of biscuit and rusty water.

buwaya said...

Ditto rec on "Dreadnaught".

Bob Ellison said...

I recently bought a new Kershaw knife. New knives are all sharp. I figured it would be worthwhile trying shaving with it. So I shaved about a square inch of arm hair off with it. No problem. That sharp. Too sharp to take to my face.

chickelit said...

William said...The Google people are pushing for a Clooney presidency. Critical pieces about Clooney will not survive long on the internet.

That would be evil.

chickelit said...

Quaestor said...One of my favorite popular histories on the subject. Everyone should read that book before advancing an opinion on the Great War.

Does the book discuss how the Germans became pre-eminent in submarine warfare in WW I?

rhhardin said...

Key West weather radar finally stopped working.

Maybe the generator is out of gas.

Our own phone system keeps running on batteries for about four hours after it loses power and then there's no dial tone. This is hard on animals if you're using the phone system's 48v to heat a fish tank.

rhhardin said...

NYT overwrites

After wreaking devastation through the Caribbean and forcing one of the largest evacuations in American history, Hurricane Irma ripped away from the Florida Keys on Sunday afternoon and moved toward southwest Florida, where residents were bracing after days of frantic preparation.

compare

It was a morning like any other as Jim loaded the car with dynamite for a day of bass fishing.

Unknown said...

this is all you need to know about Little Red Riding Hood.

Unknown said...

OK, I lied: Also this, this, this and this.

That should do it.

Michael K said...

German battleships had but one mission, to fight and destroy the Royal Navy in the North Sea. It was incapable of anything else. Thus it was when Emperor William II told British journalists that his fleet would help the British guarantee free commerce on the sea the British public knew he was lying.

All this is simply an ego trip by Wilhelm II. His father and grandfather considered England an ally. He fired Bismarck, the author of the German state. The Allies should have marched to Berlin, hung Wilhelm from a lamp post and told the Germans that he had been responsible for all their pain.

The German Army on November 11,1918 was a shell. It would not have been as costly as feared.

Michael K said...

"OK, I lied: Also this, this, this and this."

When I wrote the wolf ate LRRH, I meant in a culinary fashion.

buwaya said...

No, Dreadnaught is for the most part about the pre-1914 Naval arms race. And it's geopolitical consequences.
Submarines had little to do with that, and Germany was not intending a submarine blockade of Britain at the the time, and was not prepared to try. All that came in the course of the war.

n.n said...

So, the weird and depraved wolf -- Cecile perchance? -- in Little Red Riding Hood was the carnivorous inspiration for Planned Parenthood. Clinical, not culinary.

Hagar said...

"Dreadnaught" or "Dreadnought"? And by whom?

One big trouble with the 1918 armistice was that the German people had not suffered the agony of defeat since the war was stopped while it was still waged all outside of Germany, and this gave rise to the belief that they had been betrayed - "knifed in the back" - while they were actually winning.

Michael K said...

Had the Kaiser been smart enough to follow his U boats to war and not spent all the treasure on the High Seas Fleet, Germany would have won the war. Even in 1914, they were sinking British ships.

This striking first appearance of the submarine in war time history was even surpassed on 22nd September 1914, when SM U-9 (Kptlt. Otto Weddigen) sank the three cruisers HMS Aboukir, Hogue and Cressy (12,000 tons each) off the Hook of Holland in 75 mins.
1,460 British sailors died in this world shattering demonstration of the U-boat's terrible capabilities.


Still, it should not have happened.

antiphone said...

what have you got in that basket?

A big plate of beef chow mein?

Mark said...

why not eat her first as an appetizer and then proceed to Grandma's for the main course? Pretending to be Grandma is just a waste of precious energy. Predators should avoid such trifles.

What?? No.

Any villain from James Bond or Batman will tell you that you need a big complex Rube Goldberg type of plan. Like something the government would come up with.

Michael K said...

After the cruisers were sunk, Britain banned any attempts to rescue survivors in the water, which may have affected the Lusitania.

buwaya said...

Just to show how fast technology was evolving -
The Hogue, Cressy and Aboukir would have been of decisive value at Tsushima (1905) probably.
The Japanese armored cruiser squadron, of similar specifications, certainly was.
But by 1914, nine years later, these armored cruisers were just slow targets for battle cruisers and submarines.

rhhardin said...

Little drops of water
Tiny grains of sand
Make a summer cottage
More than I can stand.

Reporter Asked Florida Gov if He’s Worried About Losing His Beach Home. His Next 5 Words Define Leadership.

buwaya said...

As per Vox Day, Vol 1 of Jerry Pournelle's classic anthology "There Will Be War" is free today and tomorrow on Amazon
I believe this is the Kindle version only.

buwaya said...

Ah, they will be doing free days for all volumes of "There Will Be War" all next week.
Check Vox Popoli for details.
This is an opportunity, don't miss it.
This was an extremely influential series in its day.

Michael K said...

"But by 1914, nine years later, these armored cruisers were just slow targets for battle cruisers and submarines."

And the two not torpedoed stopped to rescue survivors of Aboukir, the first sunk.

Ralph L said...

Do you have any apples in that basket?

Ralph L said...

His Next 5 Words Define Leadership.

Which were?
House reportedly worth $15 million.

buwaya said...

Vol 1 of Pournelle's "There Will Be War" includes, among other things, a prequel story cut out of the draft of Niven and Pournelle 's "Mote in Gods Eye", a short story by James Warner Bellah, writer of the "Cavalry" trilogy ( "F ort Apache, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon", etc.), the original short story version of Orson Scott Card's "Enders Game", etc.
Dont miss it, free on Amazon today and tomorrow.

brylun said...

... what have you got in that basket?

What a racist media! Every looter is black?

frak said...

The rakham painting is hideous.

DavidD said...

http://www.valentinabattortidesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/tex-avery-hood.jpg

Michael K said...

"His Next 5 Words Define Leadership.

Which were?"

There are more important things than houses.

Unknown said...

http://www.valentinabattortidesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/tex-avery-hood.jpg

Yep, that's Tex Avery's Red Hot Riding Hood, another worthy entry.

Quaestor said...

Does the book discuss how the Germans became pre-eminent in submarine warfare in WW

Dreadnought by Robert K. Massey ( https://www.amazon.com/Dreadnought-Britain-Germany-Coming-Great/dp/0345375564/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1505087813&sr=1-2&keywords=dreadnought ) Concentrates on diplomacy and naval policy from the 1880s to 1914. The actual war is not discussed at length primarily because Massey had another book,Castles of Steel, in preparation when Dreadnought was published.

Germany became "pre-eminent in submarine warfare" almost entirely by default. The blockade of the entrances to the North Sea cut off virtually all of Germany's seaborne commerce by the late autumn of 1914, after that there very few were targets for British submarines to attack, whereas there was an abundance of Entente merchant shipping for German u-boats to prey upon, particularly in the Western Approaches, an area well-within the operating range of the Type UE-1 class boats and subsequent classes of ocean-going subs. The success of the German submarine force was more a function of ineffective defensive measures than any particular technological or operational brilliance on the part of the Kaiserliche Marine. RN subs did occasionally penetrate the Baltic Sea on missions aimed at German commerce with Sweden, iron ore shipments mostly. These were mostly unsuccessful since most of those deliveries were made by Swedish-flagged carriers. The Baltic was also a very difficult target to penetrate since both Sweden and Denmark were neutral the available channel to warship passage was very narrow and easily mined by German patrol craft.

eddie willers said...

The locals in Atlanta are shutting down everything tomorrow. You would think a big thunderstorm would not freak out folks here.

As Aunt Pittypat said, "Rain....in Jawja!"

Big Mike said...

There was another X9 (big) solar xray flare. They're pretty rare usually and we've had a cluster of them.

Tomorrow's headline at the Times: "Solar flares signal end of life on earth. Hillary Clinton affected."

Humperdink said...

Live streaming NBC 2 out of Ft Myers, FL. It is a very good feed. They kinda/sorta admitted they maybe/probably overstated the probable/potential storm surge numbers. But it was in the public interest.

Just got off the phone (land line) with my BIL in Port Charlotte, FL. Lost cable and internet, but still has electric. Storm surge for that area begins at midnight.

tim in vermont said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
tim in vermont said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
tim in vermont said...

A huge airborne relief mission is en route to the Keys to help people impacted by the devastation caused when the eye of Hurricane Irma blasted through the Lower Florida Keys at daybreak Sunday morning.

Monroe County Emergency Management Director Martin Senterfitt called the destruction caused by Irma, a massive Category 4 storm when it impacted the Keys, a “humanitarian crisis.”

Among the services coming to the Keys are “disaster mortuary teams,” he said during a conference call.

United States Air Force special operations pilots are testing flights with C-130 cargo planes around the massive storm from Mississippi to the Keys in anticipation of the mission, which will include Air National Guard flights of more C-130s and helicopters following the fixed-wing flights.


<a href="http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article172463131.html>Miami Herald</a>

I hope it's just exaggerated rumor.

tim in vermont said...

My friends and family are getting the worst of it right now. You never really know until the news helicopters get back in the air. I remember after Andrew everybody was like "whew!" but then the next day reports started coming in.

Molly said...

"Tatiana Celia Kennedy Schlossberg and George Winchester Moran were married Sept. 9 at the bride’s family home on Martha’s Vineyard. Deval L. Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts, officiated. The couple met at Yale, from which they both graduated with distinction. Ms. Schlossberg, 27, was until July a reporter at The New York Times, where she covered climate change and the environment. She also received a master’s degree in United States history from the University of Oxford, England. She is a daughter of Caroline B. Kennedy and Edwin A. Schlossberg of New York. The bride’s father, an artist, founded ESI Design, an interactive design firm in New York, of which he is the principal designer. Her mother served as United States ambassador to Japan from 2013 to 2017. From 2002 to 2011, she served as vice chairwoman of the Fund for Public Schools in New York. The bride is a granddaughter of President John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Mr. Moran, 28, is a fourth-year medical student at Columbia. He is a son of Mary J. Penniman and Garrett M. Moran of Greenwich, Conn. The groom’s mother is the treasurer of the board of Natural Resources Defense Council. His father is the president of Year Up in New York, a nonprofit organization that provides technical and professional training to low-income high school graduates who are unemployed and not enrolled in school. He previously served as the chief operating officer of the private equity group at Blackstone, the New York investment firm."

There is so much in this wedding announcement that intrigues me: Caroline Kennedy's marriage to Edwin Schlossberg seems to have been a remarkably stable and drama free relationship. But the elites marry the elites, don't they? (How many generations of elites marrying elites can you find in this article?) And the elites do good, don't they? (I mean they don't devote their lives to self aggrandizement or laziness.) And you don't get to be a 4th year medical student by riding your parents' connections, do you? Is Edwin Schlossberg a well known artist?

tcrosse said...

Re: Molly @8:29
Anyone who doubts there is a rigid class system in the US need only read the wedding announcements in the Sunday New York Times.

Michael K said...

"Do as I say and not as I do" is the lefty Gospel.

On the other hand, they do the opposite. Marriage and children and stable families.

Money helps.

Darrell said...

Are we subject (or is the Althouse blog subject) to UK laws regarding speech, now that Google is hosting Althouse in the UK?

http://althouse.blogspot.co.uk/

Quaestor said...

Ms. Schlossberg, 27, was until July a reporter at The New York Times, where she covered climate change and the environment.

In other words a professional propagandist.

Darrell said...

Is the switch to UK servers Google's way of getting rid of the Althouse blog? Afterall some geeezer went to trial (and jail) for saying he picked the wrong day to NOT wear his burka when he was stuck in a security line in London for hours, when passengers in burkas were being waived through.

chickelit said...

Darrell said...Are we subject (or is the Althouse blog subject) to UK laws regarding speech, now that Google is hosting Althouse in the UK?

What an ignominious end to the Althouse blog: to be brought down by the same forces which suppressed The Beatles, The Who, and any number of bands set free by Radio Caroline.

chickelit said...

Unknown said...Yep, that's Tex Avery's Red Hot Riding Hood, another worthy entry.

Thanks for that! My personal favorite.

David Begley said...

Bannon needs to do more TV but fix his red eyes.

Darrell said...

Well there was that British musician arrested for performing a cover of Kung Foo Fighting after a couple of Chinese tourists complained to Community Policing Officers.

mockturtle said...

There is so much in this wedding announcement that intrigues me: Caroline Kennedy's marriage to Edwin Schlossberg seems to have been a remarkably stable and drama free relationship. But the elites marry the elites, don't they? (How many generations of elites marrying elites can you find in this article?) And the elites do good, don't they? (I mean they don't devote their lives to self aggrandizement or laziness.)

Molly, are you suggesting that noblesse oblige is alive and well?

Bob Ellison said...

On the keyboard, I keep going from B-flat to F. Then to E-flat.

It seems like an affectation. Shouldn't be this easy. I can do this in B Major.

Those key signatures feel easy under the fingers. I want to be able to do them all.

There's nothing wrong with C and G. They work really well. Nothing wrong with them.

exiledonmainstreet said...

"Caroline Kennedy's marriage to Edwin Schlossberg seems to have been a remarkably stable and drama free relationship."

Unusual for a Kennedy.

brylun said...

Joan Osborne just released a Bob Dylan cover album. Amazon reviewers give it a 4.7 and I liked "The Mighty Quinn."

Etienne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
buwaya said...

Book rec - just started re-reading my old copy (was looking up something redirected from the History of the RAF) -

"Eastern Approaches", Fitzroy Maclean.
Available, still, on Amazon. Not on Kindle sadly.

An adventurer and his adventures, told about as well as they can be. Imagine Paul Theroux, but a Theroux with a reason to be there and missions to accomplish, at constant risk of life.

buwaya said...

Also, FYI, my wife obtained the first three episodes of the new season of "Victoria", at the moment the best thing on the BBC. Remarkably well shot, Jenna Coleman is remarkably pretty, the script isnt half bad and does cover much of the history of the time. Liberties are taken (Ada Lovelace makes an appearance, dont ask further).

BudBrown said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mac McConnell said...

Jenna Coleman is adorable and very good in "Victoria". The series is worth watching.

Ralph L said...

I wonder if they'll fatten her up as Victoria gets older.

Paco Wové said...

Liberties are taken

I assume Victoria and Lovelace team up and form a kick-ass crime fighting duo, using the latter's computing brilliance and the former's mad martial arts skillz?

(Wait, sorry, you said don't ask.)

Professional lady said...

I love this illustration and also the Arthur Rackham one.

William said...

I started watching Victoria mostly because of Jenna Coleman. I think the fact that Jenna is so pretty and appealing throws off the historical accuracy somewhat, but the series is definitely fun to watch. There's some Harlequin romance in some of the scenes, but, when you stop to think about it, young Victoria lived in the era of peak Harlequin romance......The period clothing and hairdos look absolutely authentic, but they don't look dowdy on Jenna Coleman.