July 26, 2017

50 years ago today: Day 4 of the 12th Street Riots.

We've been following the story of this 5-day incident using Wikipedia. Earlier posts here (Day 1) and here (Day 2).
Starting at 1:30 on Tuesday, July 25, some 8,000 Michigan Army National Guardsmen were deployed to quell the disorder. Later, their number would be augmented with 4,700 paratroopers from both the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions [sent by LBJ], and 360 Michigan State Police officers....

Some analysts believed that violence escalated with the deployment of troops, although they brought rioting under control within 48 hours...  Tanks and machine guns were used in the effort to keep the peace.... By Thursday, July 27, sufficient order had returned to the city that officers withdrew ammunition from the National Guardsmen stationed in the riot area and ordered them to sheath their bayonets...

The Detroit riot was a catalyst to violence elsewhere as the riot spread from the city into adjoining suburbs and to other areas of Michigan.... The state deployed National Guardsmen or state police to other Michigan cities as simultaneous riots erupted in Pontiac, Flint, Saginaw, and Grand Rapids, as well as in Toledo and Lima, Ohio; New York City and Rochester, New York; Cambridge, Maryland; Englewood, New Jersey; Houston, Texas; and Tucson, Arizona. Disturbances were reported in more than two dozen cities.

36 comments:

Otto said...

Worthless generation

JohnAnnArbor said...

The newspapers here are relentless on this, multiple articles a day, calling it a "rebellion" or an "uprising," all of it blame-the-cops.

Not really very reflective coverage, I must say.

Michael K said...

At the height of the Watts riot in 1965, several gunshot wound cases refused treatment.

At least one black woman who tried to run a road block with a car full of Molotov cocktails died refusing treatment.

AllenS said...

Did you skip Day 3?

Earnest Prole said...

This is why we can't have nice things.

Char Char Binks said...

The grievance industry was BS from the start. I have no sympathy for those people, and their lives don't matter to me.

exiledonmainstreet said...

Detroit was one of the 5 richest cities in the US back in the 1920's, thanks to the auto industry. A few years back I came across some site which compared old photos of beautiful, stately buildings built during Detroit's heyday with their present decrepit state. The present day photos look like Berlin in 1945. Except the people who live in Detroit did it to themselves.

Look on the works of liberals and despair.

Bob Ellison said...

American riots tend to happen about every 25 years. We're due for another one about now.

Every generation breeds a new group of leftist fascists. The old ones in Congress are going out to pasture, but there's always a new crop.

Michael K said...

Watts was 52 years ago and it's not rebuilt. It's mostly Hispanic now.

Richard said...

I'd just gotten back from Mississippi doing civil rights work at Rust College. We discussed the next year. Could we be of use in Detroit?
Possibly, but we thought Mississippi would be safer. So south we went.

Mountain Maven said...

If we'd had a real president instead of the corrupt and incompetent LBJ things might have been different. e.g. no Vietnam war

bagoh20 said...

"This is why we can't have nice things."

That really is the overall message of the whole crapfest. The self-destruction combined with the liberal response to it is exactly why some people in some places can't have nice things and never will. The impotence of the government response to repair these places only serves to soil the rest of the country with it's enormous wasted costs. Law and order is what makes more successful places succeed. As long as the citizen of these place hate law and order, they will hate the lives they have there.

Feste said...

“ .. riot was a catalyst to violence elsewhere ..”

"The Riot and the Dance: Foundational Biology."
Perfect Paperback – January 20, 2015 - $70.00 paperback. No Kindle.

May read it.

After finishing, "Affluence Without Abundance: The Disappearing World of the Bushmen."

“Bushmen” book makes me wonder. just wondering, about this: “riot was a catalyst to violence elsewhere.” The biological/anthro (physical anthro, not cultural) economics of “riots” works against the 15-hour work-week argued as an innate-plus-learned feature of human behavior. Haven't finished the book yet.

Not applying this to Detroit. Zone is too hot to land.

Feste said...

Oh shit ..

"Wilson [author of "Riot and the Dance" doesn't hide his beliefs about creation beginning with God's Word."

Didn’t see that one a-skimming along dumb as.

Intelligent designers? For riots now? Always a good tactic to know how the other side thinks, but @ $70.00 for paperback? No Kindle? How expensive is intelligent design getting these days? What, for a riot, and all?

AllenS said...

We got a incompetent LBJ, because of one person, and one person only, JFK.

rhhardin said...

Riots (1977-) the story of Alex Haley's family line

Michael said...

My favorite part of urban riots is that they rob then burn their liquor stores. How fucking stupid can you get?

Browndog said...

I can tell you that here in the Metro-Detroit media market they now refer to the riots as an uprising, a revolt, part of the civil rights movement--as a result of this movie.

The problem is, too many were alive back then; it was not that long ago. Call screeners to the local talk radio shows are having a hard time finding people that lived it willing to toe the new narrative.

Browndog said...

I should add, that somehow the role of the Black Panthers--the killers, the snipers, are being completely whitewashed from any role in the riots.

Michael K said...

"We got a incompetent LBJ, because of one person, "

Herbert Brown, founder of Brown and Root had an awful lot to do with LBJ.

Remember, "Down in my country politicians stay bought."

B&R bought Lyndon in 1937 and he stayed bought.

Bay Area Guy said...

Detroit is the worst. Next, Chicago. Next, Baltimore.

I know Oakland, though. Downtown. Broadway and Telegraph.

There are glimmers of a proud past. The Fox Theater. The Tribune Tower. DeLauer's

But...

If you stroll down Broadway, you will note there is only 1 hotel - the Marriott. Nobody, I mean nobody, is coming to "visit" Oakland. Tourism is virtually zero. Second, every third or 4th building is vacant. Whenever there's a riot/protest, the thugs emerge and smash storefronts.

Nobody, I mean nobody, is gonna invest in property or a small business if Leftwing rioters will burn your building down.

So, it remains an "underperforming" asset - whereas SF across the bay has billions in properties and businesses.

C'est la vie

Browndog said...

There is no traffic in Detroit, even during "rush hour".

5-8 lanes of road, only a handful of cars.

It blew my mind.

Jupiter said...

"My favorite part of urban riots is that they rob then burn their liquor stores. How fucking stupid can you get?"

You could try to rob them *after* you burn them.

"Urban", hey? Yeah, I guess you don't get many liquor stores robbed and burned in your typical rural riot.

Browndog said...

A few days following the Rodney King riots in L.A, one of the alphabet networks interviewed a woman on the streets, hoping to show her personal plight.

After a moment or two of hyperventilation and screeching, down with the cause, she told a national audience how she was now paralyzed because they burned down the Post Office, and had no idea how she would get her welfare check.

William said...

Prior to the uprising blacks moved to Detroit. After the uprising and the election of Coleman Young, blacks moved out of Detroit. How many blacks move out of a city because of high crime versus how many blacks move out of a city because of police brutality. Are there any statistics on this?

Browndog said...

Blacks move out of Detroit into the burbs due to crime daily.

The problem is, crime follows.

That's just a fact.

chickelit said...

@Althouse: What did these riots accomplish, in your opinion? You seem obsessed with reliving them.

chickelit said...

The Detroit riots helped convince Berry Gordy, Jr. to relocate his record company to L.A. and that was the end of Motown Records.

Browndog said...

Detroit just "celebrated" it's founding. 1701.

Hundreds of years of building only took 20 years to destroy.

chickelit said...

Hundreds of years of building only took 20 years to destroy.


"It took them only an instant to cut off his head, but France may not produce another such head in a century."

~Joseph Louis Lagrange commenting on the beheading of Antoine Lavoisier by French revolutionaries in 1794.

Browndog said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Browndog said...

No one exploits blacks with the level and efficiency of fellow blacks.

It's heartbreaking to watch.

David said...

I was in Detroit the night the riots started. It was my wife's birthday and we went in from Ann Arbor to celebrate. It was a warm night and we had the top down on a Ford convertible driving home. Next morning back in Ann Arbor, when we learned about the arrests and shooting (It was not yet officially a riot.), we thought we might have heard sirens or gunshots late when were were heading out of the city. That was our imagination, as we were home before the arrests were made at the blind pig.

Then the whole horror unfolded and there was real concern in Ann Arbor, including rumors of carloads or busloads of armed black people heading west from the city. I did not believe that, nor did most people I think, but the worry was there.

I don't think these events "destroyed" the old prosperous job generating Detroit. More likely they illuminated a destruction already in progress and intensified a racial divide that accelerated the demise. The big problems were bad schools, crime, a peaking auto industry and poor leadership, not just by the corrupt black leaders of the city but also by the unions and the powerful corporations and white churches and other institutions.

My immigrant grandparents had grown up poor in Detroit. But they were white and they got decent educations in the public schools. They were gone from Detroit by 1912, but I have learned a lot about their lives there and about what kind of place it was. It was a land of opportunity for them and many like them. A decade or so later came the wave of black immigrants from the American south. They had as a group much bigger obstacles than my grandparents. Part of these barriers were self created, but the biggest obstacles were race, and economic institutional decline in the city. Again the riots were a symptom not a cause, though certainly they helped to accelerate the process.

Earnest Prole said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rcommal said...

July 26th is also the birthday of [what would become] the FBI.

---

Anyhoo. I do remember in a vague yet quite sharp way the streets riots. My family was very blunt about reality and never protected us from news of the day, much less from current events. In fact, I, and then later we, got quizzed quite sharply at dinner every night, at the least. Pay attention!!!--was the strict message.

; )

rcommal said...

"Weren't you listening to the radio?" "Weren't you there when we were talking about this?" "Didn't you read the papers?" "What, you can't walk to the library and find out for yourself?" "Jesus, can't you sit still for 30 minutes. The NEWS is on."