December 10, 2015

Making Belgian Booyah the Wisconsin state soup."

"This bill will designate Belgian Booyah the state soup as a way to honor Wisconsin's Belgian heritage and celebrate Booyah's ability to bring Wisconsin communities together."

I have never heard of Belgian Booyah, but apparently it's a northeast Wisconsin thing (and sold at Lambeau Field restaurants). It's fine with me if a state has a soup, and even if the soup is associated with a subsection of the state that's not mine, especially since it's a part of the state that really needs soup.

Here's some background on Belgian Booyah, with photos and a recipe that looks good, replete with short ribs and chicken thighs.

ADDED: Does any other state have a soup? Is there any other soup that might be considered the Wisconsin soup? I've seen beer cheese soup.

29 comments:

walter said...

This is a proud moment for the oft disenfranchised Belgian American community. Forward.

lgv said...

Short ribs and chicken legs, how bad can it be? Well, other than the peas and carrots. I'm about to look up Rutabaga.

I'll make a Texas version with chipotles.


David Begley said...

It must be beer cheese soup. Anything else would a slap in the face of all things Wisconsin.

This political movement must be stopped now!

robother said...

So Jim Cramer is Belgian? Booyahs from New Jersey, Jim.

MayBee said...

Beer cheese soup should be every states' soup.

Ipso Fatso said...

I have never heard of any state, let alone Wisconsin, having an official state soup. I googled "state songs" and "state birds" and a web site came up for each with the title 50 US State Birds, etc. I did the same for soups and got nothing.

Is Wisconsin the only state to have an official state soup? I wonder if MA has Boston Clam Chowder as its state soup? I can see chili being a big deal in Texas, but is that a soup? I don't think so but maybe it is considered one down there. What a kooky world.

Char Char Binks said...

Boom!

Carter Wood said...

Does Pea Soup Lake in Washington count?

campy said...

Belgian soup? Isn't this a textbook case of Cultural Appropriation? Thus a Hate Crime?

Rocketeer said...

Kentucky has burgoo.

traditionalguy said...

I read the recipe. Outside of Belgium that would be called meat stew, not soup which is mostly liquid but for a few floaters for flavor.

Where's the pork?

lgv said...

Menudo. Personally not a fan. I'd rather have ribs and chicken thighs than tripe.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

I thought Making Belgian Booyah is how Belgians made more Belgians

Ann Althouse said...

"One of the country’s largest concentrations of Walloon-speaking Belgians is found in northeastern Wisconsin, resulting in a unique cultural and social flavor. The largest wave of Belgian immigration to Wisconsin occurred in the mid-1850s. While the 1850 U.S. Census lists only 45 persons of Belgian nativity in the state, by 1860 the number had increased to 4,647. The 1890 U.S. census also shows that 81% of Belgians in the state lived in the northeastern counties of Brown, Kewaunee, and Door. The Belgian immigration into northeastern Wisconsin came to an abrupt halt in about 1858, when word reached the homeland of the physical and economic hardships and the cholera epidemic sweeping the settlement. The first Belgian settlers made a living making shingles and farming small plots of land..."

Sal said...

I thought that was a Minnesota soup.

Fernandinande said...

Tried google ["state soup" -wisconsin] and in a few minutes only got:

Minnesota State Soup: Wild Rice

Which isn't surprising because Wisconsin and Minnesota are the same thing...

Vittorio Jano IV said...

Hawaii: Saimin (all different kine)
http://midlifecrisishawaii.com/tag/shiros-saimin-haven

traditionalguy said...

You would think the Belgium folks would have liked French Onion Soup more. But that dish sounds more like a frontier community effort to throw whatever you have into a Stew Pot in the morning and come back and eat it after working on the fields and barns all day.

In Brunswick, Georgia the settlers had a similar tradition with pork parts and corn. Brunswick is a sea port next to St Simons Island.

David said...

oh please don't.

Original Mike said...

"Which isn't surprising because Wisconsin and Minnesota are the same thing..."

I thought comment moderation was supposed to stop this sort of thing.

The Drill SGT said...

The Classic Belgian stew is Beef/Beer Carbonnade.

Ingredients
2 lb. beef chuck, cut into 2″ x 1⁄2″-thick slices
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1⁄4 cup flour
4 tbsp. unsalted butter
4 slices bacon, finely chopped
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced lengthwise
2 cups Belgian-style ale, like Ommegang Abbey Ale
1 cup beef stock
2 tbsp. dark brown sugar
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
3 sprigs thyme
3 sprigs parsley
2 sprigs tarragon
1 bay leaf
Bread, for serving

ganderson said...

I live in MA now, but I grew up in St. Paul, my son and daughter-in-law live in Milwaukee... eh, pretty much the same states. Dunno how many Belgians live west of the St. Croix, however.

Fritz said...

As far as I can determine, Maryland does not have an official state soup, but if we did, it would have to be crab soup (red only, please, chowder is OK, but it belongs to New England).

Since my representatives seem to have nothing useful to do, maybe I'll suggest it.

RecChief said...

didn't read the recipe but it looks somewhat like Burgoo (kentucky)

Alice Aforethought said...

Nothing like a pasty and a bowl of booyah. Go Yoopers.

Mom2Es said...

I used to live in NE Wisconsin, and I've never heard of it, either.

walter said...

Sounds like a micro-brew.

Ambrose said...

There is Rhode Island clam chowder - which has clear broth and is thus different from both Manhattan (tomato base) and New England (cream base).

mikee said...

So I accepted Althouse's challenge, googled "Texas State Foods" and got the list on Wikipedia. No soup for us!

But the state "dish" is chile con carne. Which is a beef chili made using beef, chili, cumin, salt, pepper, some masa flour for thickening, and NO DAMN BEANS, NO DAMN TOMATOES.

Wikipedia's picture for chile con carne has red beans and tomatoes in it.

Is nothing sacred?