September 27, 2015

"Boehner’s departure *not* bigger than Cantor loss. Cantor a terrifying vote of the people."

 Says Mickey Kaus, disagreeing with a CNN piece that says: "Boehner's departure might be the conservative right's most famous get yet -- even bigger than the coup against his former lieutenant Eric Cantor in a primary election in 2014."

23 comments:

Michael K said...

Cantor was the first Ruling Class head to fall. It won't be the last.

mccullough said...

Cantor was voted out by the Republicans in his Richmond area district. If these are the people, then Kaus lives on n a bubble.

Freder Frederson said...

Cantor was the first Ruling Class head to fall. It won't be the last.

What exactly is your endgame? Anarchy. The tea party types have certainly signaled that they have no interest in governing, just blowing up the government.

Anonymous said...

How the hell could CNN use "coup" against Cantor? Do they know what "coup" mean? Cantor had no right to stay in his post unless the voters said so. If he continued to stay after voters voted him down, then it would be Cantor's coup against the voters.

Btw, CNN stupid reporters, we are still a Republic, not a monarchy even if you treated Dear Leader like your god damned king.

Anonymous said...

F Fredeerson, you sound like a sheep. Whatever the ruling class do is ok with you.

The endgame is, voters vote. They vote down politicians who don't represent them.

Anarchy is when the elite rulers do whatever they want, ignoring the voters. Tea Partiers will not blow up the govt., that needs sheeple like you who believe politicians in power could disregard the voters, passed super secret deals like Obamatrade, Iran Deal.

Anarchy is when politicians disregard the Constitution, Coup is when politicians disregard the voters.

Freder Frederson said...

Whatever the ruling class do is ok with you.

Whatever the ruling class does is not okay with me.

As far as I can tell the tea party and the extreme right in Congress has no coherent policies for actually running the country, all they want to do is destroy it. This is demonstrated by the popularity of the three Republican presidential candidates (Trump, Carson and Fiorina)who have zero political experience, and no coherent or responsible vision of governing. Fiorina is the most baffling as her political and business career are marked by abject failure. At least Carson and Trump can point to success in their areas of expertise (although Trump's success is marked with some pretty huge failures).

Anonymous said...

Political experience, like Dear Leader's? Hillary's?

Big Mike said...

@Freder, no one is a failure if they can climb the corporate ladder all the way into mahogany row, much less the CEO's suite. And HP is alive today (I have an HP on my desk right now); without Fiorina buying Compaq I'm certain that HP would have been relegated to a modest-sized manufacturer of printers today.

And when you type that you are not okay with whatever the ruling class tells you to do, are you lying to us? Or to yourself?

Freder Frederson said...

no one is a failure if they can climb the corporate ladder all the way into mahogany row, much less the CEO's suite.

Yeah, Bernie Ebbers and Ken Lay were rousing successes. Ebbers is going to spend the rest of his life in jail, Ken Lay avoided a long prison term only through death.

The world is littered with CEOs who were and are spectacular failures.

HP still hasn't recovered from the damage Fiorina did to it. She was a horrible failure as a CEO.

BN said...

What the tea party wants is for the country to not go bankrupt. Some of us think they will inevitably fail--and sooner rather than later--and much worse than mere anarchy will result. Not a threat, but a warning.

Big Mike said...

IMHO Boehner should have learned from what happened to Cantor. Virginia's seventh district included the suburbs of liberal college town Charlottesville and the suburbs of Richmond, as well as small cities like Culpeper. It contains a cross section of American voters, so something was happening inside the party. People in the 21st century Democrat party will do anything their leaders tell them to do -- those who won't have already left that party in disgust. And clearly those leaders will do whatever their donors -- George Soros, the principal partners in Goldman Sachs, etc. -- tell them to do.

The Republicans of the 21st century are quite a bit different. If you want to lead them, you'd better get in front of them.

Big Mike said...

HP still hasn't recovered from the damage Fiorina did to it. She was a horrible failure as a CEO.

You're just brainlessly repeating what you read somewhere. Try to learn from your own mistakes.

Freder Frederson said...

You're just brainlessly repeating what you read somewhere.

No, I'm just brainlessly repeating what I read almost everywhere (except Fiorina's website--which while her achievements look impressive, what is telling is the statistics that are missing, such as profit under her tenure). Please provide links to back up your claim that Fiorina saved HP.

Gahrie said...

The tea party types have certainly signaled that they have no interest in governing, just blowing up the government.

Bullshit. wanting to reign in, and reduce the size of government does not mean wanting to blow it up.

We recognize that government is a necessary evil, and we want that evil to be as small and powerless as possible.

And if they did want to blow up the government, could you blame them? It is quite obvious at this point that government agencies and employees have been conspiring with the Democrats to attack Conservatives. When the government declares war on you, you are forced to fight back.

MadisonMan said...

Given that HP exists today Freder, I'd say your original comment was more in error than what you erroneously think Big Mike claimed.

Big Mike said...

@Freder, it's not what I read from academic analyses, it's what I experienced at the time as a designer of computer systems. I don't know how far down the ladder HP servers for N-tier client server systems came; pre-Compaq merger they hardly ever made our trade study space. Pre-Fiorina HP's operating system was HP-UX, a proprietary version of Unix System V and IMAO a dog. The firm I worked for never delivered a system to the federal government based on HP-UX due to its lack of openness and poor standards conformance. I note that while HP-UX is technically still alive, the HP-Integrity line of servers supports other operating systems such as both Red Hat and SUSE Linux. Pre-Fiorina HP tried to peddle a proprietary RDBMS named IRIS(which they marketed as an object-oriented DBMS but it was just a wrapper around a relational core). At a data management conference I heard the head of an HP data management research talk about her group's work, which was based on a different commercial product and not on IRIS. So pre-Fiorina at least one research group was doing research for the sake of research and not for the sake of improving their product lineup. You would criticize Fiorina for putting a stop to that?

What I saw when Fiorina came in was a company that was not a competitor in any area except printers. When she was forced out, it was a company whose products we were buying for ourselves at home, the corporation I worked for was buying as our standard desktop, and we were incorporating into the systems we designed and built for the federal government. There was a lot of bitching from within HP about Fiorina overturning "the HP Way," but nothing in the tenets of the HP Way says anything about guaranteed lifetime employment, and HP was scarcely the only IT firm to lay off employees and lose market value during the dot-com bubble burst. After the climb-out from the bubble bursting HP found itself in the position of #1 vendor of personal computers. If you can figure out how they would have gotten there without buying Compaq, let me know. They certainly weren't going to do it with the HP-9000 line, HP-UX, and IRIS.

Fiorina may suffer when compared to Silicon Valley rock star Mark Hurd, who immediately followed her, but so would nearly everybody else. Fiorina looks very good when compared to Leo Apotheker, who followed Hurd. Under his tenure HP lost 25% in one day and over half its market value before he was forced out. HP, like any other major IT vendor is continuing the sort of restructuring and layoffs that began under Fiorina. It's a natural part of the business. Fiorina laid off 30,000 people as a consequence of the purchase of Compaq. Between 2012 and 2014, which comes three CEOs after Fiorina, HP laid off 34,000 and announced the impending layoffs of another 11,000 to 16,000 and no one seems to care. Because it's a man who laid them off?

machine said...

“The crazies have taken over the party,”

Big Mike said...

@machine, that's certainly true of the Democrats.

Hagar said...

Watched the FNS noon re-run and heard Chris Wallace suggest that John Boehner may use his remaining month to work with some Democrats in Congress to get some useful legislation done.

If so, I expect it will be a new experience for most of these Democrats. It has been a long time since anyone tried to work with them on anything - certainly not their own leadership or the administration.

Hagar said...

and, anyway, how will Boehner get past Reid and Pelosi to talk to these Democrats?

Unknown said...

--What exactly is your endgame? Anarchy. The tea party types have certainly signaled that they have no interest in governing, just blowing up the government.


What a simpleminded navel-gazing post.. You are firmly in the minority in saying that the expansion of government should not be opposed and thus characterizing any one on the other side from you as Anarchists. How moronic.


Here is what those who share your country but not your tolitarian beliefs are saying....

PRINCETON, NJ -- Seventy-two percent of Americans say big government is a greater threat to the U.S. in the future than is big business or big labor, a record high in the nearly 50-year history of this question. T

http://www.gallup.com/poll/166535/record-high-say-big-government-greatest-threat.aspx


a deep sense of economic anxiety and doubt about the future hangs over the nation, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll, with Americans’ distrust of government at its highest level ever.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/26/us/politics/poll-finds-anxiety-on-the-economy-fuels-volatility-in-the-2012-race.html?_r=0

Three in four Americans (75%) last year perceived corruption as widespread in the country's government. This figure is up from two in three in 2007 (67%) and 2009 (66%).

http://www.gallup.com/poll/185759/widespread-government-corruption.aspx?g_source=WWWV7HP&g_medium=topic&g_campaign=tiles

Douglas said...

1) I don't think a Tea Party caucus member can get elected Speaker. 2) If one did, he wouldn't last a week.

Anonymous said...

Douglas said...

1) I don't think a Tea Party caucus member can get elected Speaker. 2) If one did, he wouldn't last a week.



If he did, he was elected by a plurality of the House, he'll have more votes than all other Republican contenders, and more votes than Pelosi.