March 26, 2015

"I grew up listening to classic rock, and I'll tell you sort of an odd story: My music taste changed on 9/11."

"And it's very strange. I actually intellectually find this very curious. But on 9/11, I didn't like how rock music responded. And country music collectively, the way they responded, it resonated with me. And I have to say, it just is a gut-level. I had an emotional reaction that says, these are my people... So ever since 2001, I listen to country music. But I'm an odd country music fan, because I didn't listen to it prior to 2001."

Said Ted Cruz, quoted in Rolling Stone (where I got via Jaltcoh, who said "On 21st-century rock music, I don't like how Ted Cruz responded").

I can understand feeling so different because of 9/11 that your preference for music would changed. You might resist loud, harsh guitars and self-involved, cynical words. You might find succor in mellower instrumentation and sincere-sounding lyrics. But Cruz's isn't only talking about how he felt, subjectively. He does speak of what "resonated with" him, on a "gut-level." But he's also passing judgment on musicians, how they responded.

I don't know what the time lag is, when you're waiting for a response to a big event. On 9/11 itself, the music available was not responding to 9/11. It was all pre-9/11 music, to be played by you if you saw fit. That was your response, not music's response.  

Later, music have might responded to 9/11, but what music was that? Did rock or country music change to fit the post-9/11 world? I'm blanking. The only thing I can think of is Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising." Does Cruz have a problem with that?

What's Ted talking about? I think he uses words carefully — he's a language master — so I'm taking his language seriously. I'm making it my business to understand the "Ted talk" (to coin a phrase).

I'm queasy about his "these are my people." Cruz is a politician, so who's he trying to get in good with? And what exactly did he hear in country music that made him suddenly see himself belonging in that aural milieu?  I'm thinking he's just posing for us on the theory that we're conned by that loves-country-music bullshit. He's one of the salt-of-the-earth folks. You know, the kind who actually intellectually find their own music taste very curious. The real America.

This makes me think of that old line: "The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that you've got it made" (Jean Giraudoux). And then there are the corollaries: "It is dangerous to be sincere unless you are also stupid" (George Bernard Shaw) and "A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal" (Oscar Wilde).

Cruz is not stupid.

280 comments:

1 – 200 of 280   Newer›   Newest»
Ken B said...

You want a shitty reaction look to Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Once written, twice... said...

Right after 9/11 there was that rock concert at Madison Square Gardens with The Who, Elton John, etc.

Cruz is full of shit.

The Concert for New York City
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Concert_for_New_York_City

garage mahal said...

To say 9/11 turned you into a country music fan is the best (and saddest) dog whistle quotes in history.

Brando said...

I can understand where Cruz is coming from--it wasn't 9/11 but the early stages of the Iraq War where I started listening to country (growing up, my parents loved country and I hated hearing it on car rides--I was an oldies, classic rock, and later modern rock fan). Modern rock was stale around this time, and there was a lot of talk about country music being all pro-war and patriotism, so I was curious enough to tune into it and found I liked a lot of it (even though I was conflicted about the war). Though the only "war" song I liked from country was "Courtesy of the Red White and Blue" because it had a good tune. I didn't take it so much as a "pro-Iraq War" song per se, but rather an expression of our rage at the thugs who attacked us. Toby Keith, for his part, I don't think was in favor of the Iraq War.

SJR said...

There were several unabashedly patriotic country songs post 9/11 - think of Toby Keith's Taliban Song, or American Soldier, or Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue, or Charlie Daniels' This Ain't No Rag, It's A Flag. As the immediate post-attack unity wore off, I think it did resonate with a lot of people who had not previously listened to country music. That comment by Cruz rings true to me, even if it does happen to be politically advantageous as well, since culturally and politically, country music skews heavily Red Tribe.

Once written, twice... said...

What does it say about the current GOP that goofballs like him are taken seriously?

Brando said...

"Right after 9/11 there was that rock concert at Madison Square Gardens with The Who, Elton John, etc.

Cruz is full of shit."

I don't think that's necessarily true--country music did have a different reaction to 9/11 and the war that followed than rock music did. Country music is often described as rock music without the irony or cynicism--while I don't think that's always the case, it is true that country stars reacted to 9/11 in a different manner than rock did. It's more straightforward about its patriotism than rock.

Wilbur said...

I love Ted Cruz, but ...

When you listened to Classic Rock it wasn't classic. It was just rock.

If you listened to country music only after 2001, you just thought it was country music. It wasn't.

Merle Hagagrd definitively covered the subject a couple of decades earlier with "Fightin' Side of Me". Just listen to that and you can avoid all the third-rate rock and fake twangs which comprise country music for about the last 20 years.

Brando said...

"To say 9/11 turned you into a country music fan is the best (and saddest) dog whistle quotes in history."

Amazing you have super senses to pick up dog whistle quotes that only his super conservative supporters were supposed to hear.

damikesc said...

I stopped listening to rock shortly after 9/11 and went to country...but largely because modern rock/pop is pure shit.

Michael K said...

"What does it say about the current GOP that goofballs like him are taken seriously?"

Why don't you ask the Dixie Chicks if that is a common reaction ?

traditionalguy said...

I understand that as a music type used by Cruz to send a signal to the Scots-Irish types such as Chris Kyle that he understands them; and in a real blood and guts war time even appreciates their strange attitude that music contains.

To be an American he had worked hard to make himself part of the Harvard elite culture. That northeastern culture is trained to despise the southern Nashville/Texas culture. That is a culture dumb enough to charge into a fight instead of carefully arranging for other fools to do it.

So Cruz is signalling he is not a Northeastern Liberal. That helps Walker in the long run because Walker can pass for one.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

The sincerity may be real. Country music is the only genre a Republican can play on the campaign bus and not expect to get a cease and desist.

Does this count as a gaffe, something true that he shouldn't have said?

Brando said...

"When you listened to Classic Rock it wasn't classic. It was just rock."

Growing up, we defined "classic rock" as any rock and roll from 1964-1980; anything before that was '80s, anything after that but before then then-present was "crap."

Nowadays, I suppose "classic rock" may include rock post-1980, though I don't know where the cutoff is. I think music has to be about 10 years old before it gets re-appreciated as "classic" or "oldie".

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

Cruz is not stupid and neither is the woman who cuts my hair.

They differ in that she's not a cynical, pandering, power-hungry, lying, monomaniacal piece of shit.

Crimso said...

As long as he don't get no ways tired.

"What does it say about the current GOP that goofballs like him are taken seriously?"

A more interesting question might be what it says about Alan Dershowitz. If you're not familiar with his opinion of Cruz, you might consider looking it up and thinking about it.

You might not like him or agree with him, but he clearly has a formidable intellect. Formidable. Doesn't mean he would make a good President. I prefer people who have executive experience in a governmental sense. Unfortunately, we don't always have that as a choice.

CPJones said...

You might resist loud, harsh guitars and self-involved, cynical words.

This would be modern country or rock? I'm confused.

rhhardin said...

It's an Ă–strogenwolkeausrutscher, estrogen cloud slip-up.

Laslo Spatula said...

"Nowadays, I suppose "classic rock" may include rock post-1980, though I don't know where the cutoff is. I think music has to be about 10 years old before it gets re-appreciated as "classic" or "oldie"."

I think the definition of 'classic rock' is whatever songs of their youth that Baby Boomers want to hear over and over.

I am Laslo.

rhhardin said...

I switched to the Dixie Chicks.

garage mahal said...

There is no such thing as rock music. It's called rock and roll. Boiled down further, there is blues, and then everything else.

Lem said...

Did rock "respond" to the civil rights movement of the 60's.

The reason I ask is because I was only an infant then.

Delayna said...

Come on people now, smile on your brother...

I dunno, Lem, maybe so. I was a little past infancy then but not enough for political analysis.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

Althouse is the quintessential North Country music fan.

Unknown said...

Ted talk sounds similar to Ted conference

CStanley said...

I have no idea what he really likes or dislikes but I'm inclined to think he's posing. He's expressing intellectually the emotional pull of patriotism which is often expressed in country music but never in rock.

Compare any of Springsteen's lyrics with "God Bless the USA" (which predates 2001 but became wildly popular when rereleased.) The Rising was all about personal, individual reactions to 9/11 while GBTUSA tapped into patriotic pride.

Delayna said...

Of course, modern pop leaves me cold--I swear, every song sounds the same to me. I don't know if I should wish that it's true--a sign of cultural collapse--or if it's just me, and a sign of incipient GetOffMyLawn.

MadisonMan said...

"Classic Rock" is from the 1960s.

Oh, but I see he didn't capitalize Classic.

I don't think classic rock when he was growing up was very classic. That would be mid-80s onwards. Culture Club? No. Phil Collins? Meh. U2 -- maybe.

Freder Frederson said...

This is simply pandering to his perceived base. It has no basis in fact.

Laslo Spatula said...

As Bob Dylan once sang:

"Same old song, just a drop of water in an endless sea

All we do crumbles to the ground, though we refuse to see

Dust in the wind, all we are is dust in the wind"


I am Laslo.

Lem said...

Did Pearl Harbor inspire anybody?

Maybe an attack is not something inspiring necessarily.

traditionalguy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
traditionalguy said...

I doubt the college students today would dare play Lee Greenwood's "Proud to be an American."

It would be shut down by liberals on sight just because it is red neck and it is sincere and it speaks to the hearts of families with loved ones in War Zones.

Country music that has always tried to speak a deep emotional connection to lesser educated men and women. The liberal mind constructs are shown up as houses of cards that cannot compete with it. But it makes politics work. It has that "Stand By Governor Walker" attitude.

Anonymous said...

Really, Ann, this isn't hard to understand.

Post 9/11, Country music was full of people who wanted America (and Bush) to win. Post 9/11, rock and roll was NOT full of performers who felt that way.

Scott Patton said...

Maybe his music tastes changed as a result of the artists behavior and and the things that they said after 9/11. I used to think "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" was funny. Not so much now, after hearing the words that came out of Sean Penn's hole years later. Same old movie - different reaction.

Mitch H. said...

Pfft. Tribal signaling. You want to piss on a politician for tribal signaling? At least eighty percent of retail politicking is about tribal signaling. Y'all are just cranky because your tribal music is being abused.

And I say this as someone who was big into prog rock as a teenager, and yes, have been listening to more bluegrass and old-timey since 9/11. Cruz is definitely not the only one to make the segue. "Rock" died after 9/11, and a lot of people wandered into country, since as goofy as it can be, it's at least a living tradition.

traditionalguy said...

Some here seem to have no idea what Resolve means. It is a triggered emotion that will not leave a real man until the enemy is found AND defeated.

Tank said...

I'll say this about Cruz.

1. He has the right enemies.

2. He drives them batshit crazy. Four years of that would be joyful.

Mrs. Tank and I are going to see Miranda Lambert this weekend at MSG. I'm sure there will be loud guitars, because modern country is pretty rocked up (and thank God for that).

Not sure if she has any 911 songs. Alan Jackson had a good one which he played at Carnegie Hall last year.

Laslo Spatula said...

"Did Pearl Harbor inspire anybody?"

Here.

I am Laslo.

Tank said...

Reading my own comment, it occurs to me that, if you like rocked up music, and loud guitar, and people who still love America, well, you'd get all of that now in country music.

chickelit said...

garage mahal ♤♡♢♧ said...

No matter. I'm inspired by his new handle, It reminds me of Led Zeppelin IV -- the one where they started using the runes. One for each mood. I'll bet garage is a euchre player as well.

Lem said...

Did Ted Cruz set up a trap for people to question his "sincerity" about his music taste?

Does Ted Cruz listen to Taylor Swift?... Shake it off Ted ;)

Michael K said...

"'ll say this about Cruz.

1. He has the right enemies.

2. He drives them batshit crazy. Four years of that would be joyful. "

Agree 100%.

That doesn't mean I'll vote for him but it is nice to see the left go nuts.

paminwi said...

I get the switch. 9/11 was truly a moment in my life where my appreciation for my country became much clearer and more focused than it had ever been in the past. I came to appreciate all my mom and dad had done for me, taught me, gave me emotionally in a way I had never truly articulated before. I personally did not make the music switch but can say my husband 100% made the switch because it was there in my ears every time we got in the car! (When you drive you pick the music!)

But, I get why some need to make fun of Cruz cause they don't get it, don't want to get it and somehow the demeaning of Cruz makes them feel better about themselves. Kind of like the bully thing that kids do.

Earnest Prole said...

To start, google Wikipedia: List of songs about the September 11 attacks, and focus on 2001–02. I’m guessing that like most people, Cruz’s impression was formed by a few songs and not by a statistical analysis of the whole lot. My sense from the time was that the most popular rock songs communicated the effects of the attack on individuals, while the most popular country songs communicated what the attack meant for the nation as a whole — in other words, pretty much what you would expect.

chickelit said...

Beck released an album called "Sea Change" in 2002 which was metaphorical.

Country music responded to 9/11 in a heartfelt way; rock music mostly chose to remain silent.

Meade said...

"There is no such thing as rock music. It's called rock and roll. Boiled down further, there is blues, and then everything else."

Thick As A Garage Mahal.

Drago said...

garage mahal ♤♡♢♧: "To say 9/11 turned you into a country music fan is the best (and saddest) dog whistle quotes in history."

Now that is quite a sweeping statement for a middle school scholar to make.

I wonder, how long have "dog whistles" been offered up?

What was the very first "dog whistle" uttered and where?

Mark O said...

Imagine criticizing Obama's musical choices in 2008. The swooning was endless.

Meanwhile, Hillary seeks Orwellian censorship over her critics. Please mock her.

http://dailycaller.com/2015/03/25/here-are-the-words-hillarys-supporters-wont-let-you-say/

Thorley Winston said...

Post 9/11, Country music was full of people who wanted America (and Bush) to win. Post 9/11, rock and roll was NOT full of performers who felt that way.

With the exceptions of Toby Keith, Darryl Worley and Charlie Daniels, most of the music that came out after 9/11 about 9/11 seemed to deal with feelings of grief and loss. Keith, Worley and Daniels actually put out songs that expressed their anger which was an honest emotion that a lot of other artists for whatever reasons didn’t express in their songs about a terrorist attack on America even though we’ve had lots of songs full of anger about America or (real or perceived) problems in America.

Boltforge said...

gregq said...
"Post 9/11, Country music was full of people who wanted America (and Bush) to win. Post 9/11, rock and roll was NOT full of performers who felt that way."

Well said.

I know after 9/11 I found lots of songs that spoke to me about how I felt. Examples: Nick Brown and JR Schultz with the album 'Iraq Unplugged' or Brian Holbrook's single 'My Pretty Ones'. Of course Disciple's 'Game On' also spoke to the anger ... https://youtu.be/kcM0MJXYGAQ

Did you hear anything from the world of left wing music with ...

"
I'm not afraid of loving my enemies
Turning the other cheek
Blessing those that would curse me
I honestly want peace with you

But when you come against my country
When you come against my family
You try to destroy my people
I can't just stand by

There's no way that I can stand by
This time I will not stand by
I am coming and if I come
Then pain is coming with me

I'm coming and pain will be with me
"
?

That would be to expressive of wanting to kick jihadi ass. Liberals just want to give them jobs and young girls for them to rape. That always makes liberals happy.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Has anyone asked Scott Walker if he thinks Ted Cruz is sincere in his professed musical taste?

Crimso said...

"Thick As A Garage Mahal."

As if to underscore the subdivisions of rock by slyly referencing the Grammy Award-winning heavy metal band.

Sebastian said...

Yes, Ted serves a useful purpose in being cruzified by the Left. He can handle it.

Corollary to the faking sincerity axiom: if you are sincere but appear to fake it, you're doomed. Cruz has to be careful. The smirk doesn't help. He's cocky and has a lot to be cocky about but, unlike half-black poseurs, white Hispanics don't get the Progressive cockiness exemption.

I understand the country music thing politically but will stick with my namesake, thanks.



m stone said...

Country music responded to 9/11 in a heartfelt way; rock music mostly chose to remain silent.

Good point. Even applies to the artists, the MSG performance notwithstanding.

Some people feel uncomfortable with the Cruz statement because he looks deep in himself and strays off traditional topics (I know this is RS). Others spew soundbites and whitewash and only attack others.

MadisonMan said...

County Song that sums up my reaction to all candidates so far.

Try to guess before clicking ;)

gerry said...

Tank wrote:
1. He has the right enemies.

2. He drives them batshit crazy. Four years of that would be joyful.


Like Reagan. He drove them batshit crazy for 8 years, which would even better.

I Callahan said...

Personally, I find it refreshing to see a GOP nominee not try to pander to the portion of the entertainment industry that hates the GOP. As for the liberals in the classic rock genre: fuck 'em sideways.

As much as I dislike country music, and as much as I like classic rock, country is a much more pro-American genre of music. All politicians pander; why pander to the ones who don't give a shit about you anyway?

MadisonMan said...

I really should re-work the lyrics.

J. Farmer said...

Hmm...I tend to look to my radio presets and music library for good tunes, not to have my worldview affirmed.

But who knows. Perhaps if Cruz hadn't made such a right turn on the radio dial, he would not remain so terminally confused about foreign policy.

MadisonMan said...

"So what do you think, you're Reagan or something? Whatever..."

gerry said...

white Hispanics don't get the Progressive cockiness exemption.

Unless they are card carrying Democrats or Communists.

And just wondering: is there such a thing as white Hispanic privilege? And who was the New York Times columnist who called Cruz "uppity"? Talk about slipped masks!

I Callahan said...

I'll bet garage is a euchre player as well.

In Wisconsin? I thought Euchre was a Michigan-only thing?

Shanna said...

. And country music collectively, the way they responded, it resonated with me.

That's funny because I positively LOATHED the alan jackson song that came out way too soon about 9/11. In particular, the 'i can't tell the difference between iraq and iran' part. You are a grown man and we fought had fought a war with iraq. on tv. ten years prior. Ugh. (there were a couple others songs that were better but I just hated that one so much)

Now, country music in general is full of fighting side of me, -troops type of music so I could get that. It's definately been more grounded, at least historically.

garage mahal said...

I'm inspired by his new handle

I figured it might throw off my impersonator, at least temporarily. My trolls aren't the brightest lot. So far it seems to be holding.

Delayna said...

Shanna,

The lyric made me laugh because it implied he didn't know Iraq from Iran because he watched CNN... :-)

Big Mike said...

But he's also passing judgment on musicians, how they responded.

As is his right.

I'm queasy about his "these are my people."

We like him, too. He fights back. He takes the battle to the left wing cocoon. They don't like it much. That's a good thing.

Cruz is not stupid.

No he's not.

Lem said...

Imagine criticizing Obama's musical choices in 2008. The swooning was endless.

Oh, Ted doesn't sign like Al Green. He just talks.

Birches said...

I'm not sure if I'd count immediately after 9/11 as a catalyst, but rock music was a bit difficult to listen to for a few years after 9/11 and during the Iraq War start.

Anyone remember American Idiot? Most of the rock coming out during that time period was really biased. One of my favorite punk bands came out with a very leftwing album in 2003---and followed up with the most rightwing album ever in 2009. Even punk bands can grow up, I guess.

grackle said...

Post 9/11, Country music was full of people who wanted America (and Bush) to win. Post 9/11, rock and roll was NOT full of performers who felt that way.

Bingo!!

Slightly different way of stating the same thing:

The country music crowd is largely patriotic. The rock crowd is largely NOT patriotic. The awards shows are the litmus.

holdfast said...

"Citizen Soldier" by 3 Doors Down is pretty good. Not explictly pro-war, but very pro-USA.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgV6VUinDEA

Writ Small said...

My taste in writers and commentators changed following 9/11. I had no interest in either the ironic or detached-observation style. Only morally clear and mostly serious stuff from the likes of Michael Kelly, Mark Steyn, James Lileks, Christopher Hitchens, Glenn Reynolds, and Andrew Sullivan held any appeal.

That said, there is something a bit crudely pandering in Cruz's music conversion, although that probably just means it's true.

JSD said...

We had tickets to see Lucinda Williams on 9/11. The show was cancelled, but she came back two months later. I love her, but she was definitely anti-war.

I slogged my way through punk rock, post punk, new wave etc. but finally quit at grunge rock and switched to blues/country/roots music. I came across a complete collection of the Chess Records Blues Masters Series used vinyl records. Best thing I ever bought. Everything you need to know about rock & roll can be found in 1950’s electric blues.

holdfast said...

Most Republicans between 35-55 probably grew up like Bruce Springsteen's music (notwithstanding some of his stupid comments), but they can't play any of his music at campaign events.

PuertoRicoSpaceport.com said...

It would be interesting to hear what kind of country music. He is from Austin, home of Willie Nelson, home of western swing where Bob Wills is still the king.

So perhaps Asleep at the Wheel and others in that genre? And Bob Wills, of course.

The problem with saying that one likes country music is that the genre is so very very broad.

John Henry

Brando said...

"That's funny because I positively LOATHED the alan jackson song that came out way too soon about 9/11. In particular, the 'i can't tell the difference between iraq and iran' part. You are a grown man and we fought had fought a war with iraq. on tv. ten years prior. Ugh. (there were a couple others songs that were better but I just hated that one so much)"

Yeah, it sort of drives home the point that the pro-war supporters don't even know who we should be fighting if they can't tell those countries apart.

bleh said...

Pop music in general was awful in the early 2000s. Country continued its regrettable decline into overproduced, soulless studio junk. Same with rock. Rap was experiencing a minor renaissance with Eminem, but it still was rap and therefore not music.

I have no idea what Cruz is saying, except maybe that he appreciated the overt patriotism and even anger expressed by some country stars like Toby Keith.

Rock largely ignored 9/11 and was mostly forgettable.

I am not one who thinks that musical lyrics and themes should be topical. They just need to be good.

readering said...

I wonder if geography had something to do with it. He moved to the North East for higher education and then worked in DC until soon after 9/11, when he moved back to Texas.

MadisonMan said...

I'll bet garage is a euchre player as well.

In grad school, the card game of choice was 500, which is close enough to Euchre.

I'll say he's more likely playing sheepshead.

Skeptical Voter said...

Country Joe And The Fish had a good tune circa 1967 or 68--"Waist Deep In The Big Muddy And The Big Fool Says Press On".

And Creedence Clearwater Revival, home based in Berkeley sang "Fortunate Son".

That sort of set the tone for rock music for the next 45 plus years. Nothing wrong with that--that's where one segment of society is coming from.

We've become a tribal society.

J. Farmer said...

"The country music crowd is largely patriotic. The rock crowd is largely NOT patriotic."

Who gives a shit? I don't much agree with Bono's globetrotting do-gooderism, but that has nothing to do with my ability to pop in The Joshua Tree and enjoy it.

holdfast said...

I suppose there's always 'Open Season" by Stuck Mojo. A white southern rap/metal band with a black lead vocalist. Of course, the lyrcis of ths song would give any member of the MSM an instant coronary.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymLJz3N8ayI


I speak peace when peace is spoken
But I speak war when your hate is provoking
The season is open 24-7-365
Man up yo time to ride
No need to hide behind slogans of deceit
Claiming that you're a religion of peace
We just don't believe you
We can clearly see through
The madness that you're feeding your people
Jihad the cry of your unholy war
Using the willing, the weak and poor
From birth drowning in propaganda, rhetoric and slander
All we can say is damn ya

My forefathers fought and died for this here
I'm stronger than your war of fear
Are we clear?
If you step in my hood
It's understood
It's open season

traditionalguy said...

The WAR was portrayed in the US Media and Academia as unashamedly all patriotic all the time from 1941 until 1945.

Strangely, the reverse had been happening up until June 1941 when the USSR changed sides because of an 1800 mile long surprise border dispute with 4,000,000 German troops.

Normally uneducated country music dummies are the only ones stuck on patriotism like Chris Kyle was.

Shanna said...

Yeah, it sort of drives home the point that the pro-war supporters don't even know who we should be fighting if they can't tell those countries apart.

Or that Alan Jackson rushed to get a dumb song immediately. You didn't hear that line in a Toby Keith song.

Simon said...

Tank said...
"I'll say this about Cruz. 1. He has the right enemies. 2. He drives them batshit crazy. Four years of that would be joyful."

One of the things that I like best about him is the incredulous, spittle-flecked loathing that he inspires in some of the worst people in America. Go ahead and look what the journalists who spun the myth of Ferguson are saying about Cruz; they are writing scornful columns insisting that he's a joke, that he can't win. A year from now, they'll be writing columns trying to hide their fear that he might win behind vicious personal attacks. And if it appears that he might win in the fall... Apoplexy, followed by stroke. They've got to relax a little, believe me, I know. You can't take politics so seriously.

garage mahal said...

Born near the U.S.A.
I was born near the U.S.A.
I was born near the U.S.A.
Born near the U.S.A.

garage mahal said...

I'm old enough to remember when the right was beating its chest proclaiming that the left was TERRIFIED OF SARAH PALIN. They're in a tizzy! Frothing! Foaming!

David said...

Go take a flying leap, Garage. Off the Canadian side of Niagara Falls would be appropriate.

Brando said...

"The problem with saying that one likes country music is that the genre is so very very broad."

That's true--my wife likes "alt country" (which arguably isn't really country at all) and dislikes the modern stuff. I like some of the modern stuff but prefer the older George Strait, George Jones, '70s stuff. It's like saying you like "rock"--there's a lot that fits into that.

Tank said...


Brando said...

"That's funny because I positively LOATHED the alan jackson song that came out way too soon about 9/11. In particular, the 'i can't tell the difference between iraq and iran' part. You are a grown man and we fought had fought a war with iraq. on tv. ten years prior. Ugh. (there were a couple others songs that were better but I just hated that one so much)"

Yeah, it sort of drives home the point that the pro-war supporters don't even know who we should be fighting if they can't tell those countries apart.

Why don't you point out the pro-war lyrics?

Pretty sure that the song was about:

But I know Jesus and I talk to God
And I remember this from when I was young
Faith, hope and love are some good things He gave us
And the greatest is love


Brando said...

"Or that Alan Jackson rushed to get a dumb song immediately. You didn't hear that line in a Toby Keith song."

I give Keith a lot of credit--his most controversial song ("Red White and Blue") isn't really objectionable when you think about it. It's addressed to the killers who attacked us--only the most strict pacifist would say we shouldn't strike back at them, and the song doesn't specify how and who to strike at. But like a lot of songs, people will put their own interpretation on it, so of course if you were anti-Iraq War and thought country singers and fans were just warlike yokels, (or if you were the Dixie Chicks) you took it as an endorsement of invading Iraq and hell with consequences or nuance.

Brando said...

"1. He has the right enemies.

2. He drives them batshit crazy. Four years of that would be joyful."

Those sorts of people will have the same reaction to anyone the GOP nominates. Look at how they decided moderate Mitt Romney was some cancer-giving right wing plutocrat who was going to gut social programs and end abortion as we know it.

Rick Caird said...

Ask the Dixie Chicks how "their people" responded to their comments.

I Callahan said...

I don't much agree with Bono's globetrotting do-gooderism, but that has nothing to do with my ability to pop in The Joshua Tree and enjoy it.

It makes a difference for me (not necessarily Bono, because he's been a pretty logical guy over the years), but let's say the Dixie Chicks? If I liked the Dixie Chicks before, I'd not listen to their music again.

Luckily, I didn't have to make that choice - they always sucked.

Shanna said...

Why don't you point out the pro-war lyrics?

Seriously. It wasn't pro war at all. It was 'this sad thing happened, let's sing about it'. I just hate the song. Sap, sap, sap.

the song doesn't specify how and who to strike at

Well no, but it did hit that 'we're angry and gonna fight somebody' mood pretty dead on. It's the best of a mediocre bunch though. I just don't believe in making songs about an event so specifically that just happened. Of course, I was in DC on 9/11 so maybe I took it more personally.

bleh said...

I consider myself a man of the Right, and I could not stand Sarah Palin. Not because I thought she was stupid, but because her accent annoyed me. Also, she was very unpolished and frankly ignorant, which was an embarrassment to the Republican Party.

I also dislike Ted Cruz, but for different reasons. Unlike Palin, he's highly educated and far from ignorant. My problem with him is that he's a smirking jerk and a demagogue. The similarity between him and Palin is that he appeals to the same sort of hyperconservative populist. Populism is ugly at both ends of the spectrum.

Also, the comparisons to Obama are real and worry me. Ted Cruz might be smarter or more accomplished in some ways, but he is in the same ballpark as Obama was in 2008. Ted Cruz might be one of the smartest men in Washington, but he has minimal legislative experience (since he basically does not work with others). He has even less executive experience.

Why can't we voters get behind a guy who is pragmatic and decent and hard-working and so on? Principles matter a great deal, but what good are principles if the man in charge is incapable of running his office or working with others to pass legislation and operate the unwieldy federal bureaucracy?

Char Char Binks, Esq. said...

There goes all hope for an endorsement by the Nuge.

buwaya said...

Wasn't "Dust in the Wind" by Kansas?
Even I remember that. Its from my times.
Dylan had "Blowing in the Wind", but I don't think " Dust".
"Dust" is well done but rather melancholy, negative and depressing.
Not good for anyone suicidal.
As for Cruz I agree this is all tribal signalling. Ones reaction seems mostly to do with which tribe one identifies with.

Lem said...

Say it's the 1700'S, Would an unprovoked attack, killing thousands, command the commission of a symphony?

Hard to say.

phantommut said...

They differ in that she's not a cynical, pandering, power-hungry, lying, monomaniacal piece of shit.

So you're saying your stylist isn't a politician.

traditionalguy said...

The trigger that MSNBC's guest accused Cruz of was Islamaphobia music. She drew that as a sharp contrast between Obama's best friends for life Muslims and crazy Americans who hunt them down and kill them.

MSNBC thought that through, and came back on and apologized for her.

Obama must still be seen as the American President in public, and only the Iranian President in secret.

I Callahan said...

but he has minimal legislative experience (since he basically does not work with others). He has even less executive experience.

Experience is overrated. Obama won twice in spite of a lack of experience. Is there any doubt that the things he wanted to happen, actually happened?

phantommut said...

Why can't we voters get behind a guy who is pragmatic and decent and hard-working and so on?

The classic line used when Democrats lament the lack of "pragmatic" Republicans. They'll say "Why can't you just nominate someone like McCain, or Romney, someone who doesn't put ideology before common sense." Then when the squish gets nominated the Democrats all decide he's really a crazy Republican after all.

machine said...

just hucksters using faux patriotism for easy money...which makes total sense as part of the right wing scam machine.


see redstate/goldberg on the topic.

tim maguire said...

Once written, twice... said...
What does it say about the current GOP that goofballs like him are taken seriously?


Goofball? I'm not much of a Ted Cruz fan, but you're an idiot.

holdfast said...

Why can't we voters get behind a guy who is pragmatic and decent and hard-working and so on?

Because he might have bullied a kid in high school or something. And because he was was too damned decent to really get in there and fight when he got sandbagged by Candy Crowley. And because he was a little boring (not bad in a President IMHO) and didn't excite the voters like the Lightbringer Obama.

Matt Sablan said...

"Then when the squish gets nominated the Democrats all decide he's really a crazy Republican after all."

This has been my biggest frustration. I'm moderate. I liked Romney and McCain because they had bi-partisan victories to their credit, they were the answer to the gridlock and partisan fighting that had plagued us in the late Clinton/Bush years.

This was a selling point; now, though, I've got no real bargaining power with other Republican/moderate/conservative voters because: "we tried your way. It didn't work." "If we're going to have people claim that our nominee is a super right wing radical, we might as well NOMINATE one," etc., etc.

Lnelson said...

To answer one youngster's post: Yes, rock responded to the civil rights movement...the baby boomers greatest achievement.

The guy who woke up that generation to the civil rights movement later rejected most political messages, recorded his greatest rock album in Nashville, then turned to a country sound while playing in a pink house.


Country singers tend to be taller

buwaya said...

I enjoy all your accents.
I am a foreigner and I love hearing the wild variety.
I don't understand the hostile reaction to accents. Its something in the gut I gather, but not something one can explain?
As for Palins ignorance (of what, that's of substance? I have known highly successful people who ran Fortune 500 firms with no significant "culture") this also seems to me to be a tribal reaction and rationalization. There is no practical need for much of what passes as culture here. Its highly specific as to countries also.
Populism is the curse of democracy, but the alternatives aren't so nice either.

bleh said...

@holdfast

Yep. I wonder what would have happened if Mitt was not a Mormon. Or if Hurricane Sandy had never happened.

It's funny that the high school bully accusation is being lobbed at Jeb as well. I suppose a disproportionate share of MSM reporters and columnists suffered swirlies and short sheeting.

Shanna said...

"If we're going to have people claim that our nominee is a super right wing radical, we might as well NOMINATE one," etc., etc.

None of these guys are really all that radical anyway. They are all of them politicians.

I would like someone who is at least conservative in the ways that are important to me. I didn't like McCain, but I think Romney would have been ok. Problem was he couldn't bring it home and he didn't seem to appeal to people in general. Let's pick somebody who can.

HipsterVacuum said...

For some reason Bono's crusading never grated on me, perhaps because I've always loved U2. I do think that The Joshua Tree is a bit overrated. Achtung Baby is a great album as were the early Steve Lilywhite produced albums like Boy.

And keep calling it "rock music" since it knots the panties of resident moron garage. He might look up from printing "L" and "R" on his bo-bos and pound another unfunny screed.

lemondog said...

But he's also passing judgment on musicians, how they responded.

Horrors!! Passing judgment!! Aren’t we all judgmental. Let s/he who isn’t judgmental cast the first stone.

Molehill meet mountain.

The only music I recall was God Bless the USA by country music artist Lee Greenwood and, according to Wiki, that was a re-release after 911, October 2001.

Here is a Wiki List of songs about the September 11 attacks. Recognize only a few of the performers.

I'm queasy about his "these are my people."

Agree. Even as first generation American I've never used the phrase and feel uncomfortable when others uses the phrase.

garage mahal said...

And keep calling it "rock music" since it knots the panties of resident moron garage

Children think like that. "oohh this makes liberals mad!!!"

J. Farmer said...

"Then when the squish gets nominated the Democrats all decide he's really a crazy Republican after all."

I think you are basically correct, but that's just electoral politics, and it does really affect both sides. Obama is slightly left-of-center but well within the New Democrat mold pioneered by Bill Clinton. Yet, to listen to the unhinged fuming on Fox News/talk radio, he was basically the second coming of Chairman Mao. And that says nothing of the real tinfoil hat brigade who basically believe he is a double agent working to destroy America from the inside.

Delayna said...

"Why can't we voters get behind a guy who is pragmatic and decent and hard-working and so on?

The classic line used when Democrats lament the lack of "pragmatic" Republicans. They'll say "Why can't you just nominate someone like McCain, or Romney, someone who doesn't put ideology before common sense." Then when the squish gets nominated the Democrats all decide he's really a crazy Republican after all."

You broke the code. There will never be a Republican moderate enough to not be treated as a dangerous lunatic the instant after being nominated.

rhhardin said...

"If I'd Killed You When I Wanted To I'd Be Out by Now"

favorite country title.

Brando said...

"Experience is overrated. Obama won twice in spite of a lack of experience. Is there any doubt that the things he wanted to happen, actually happened?"

I'm not so sure Obama was a success even from the standpoint of the Left. He got a stimulus passed which had a lot of pork but a lot of tax cuts in it, and the ACA was seen as a compromise that somehow didn't even get GOP votes (or all the conservative Dem votes). Then, he loses one house of Congress in the next election, and gets literally nothing done for the next four years, except incremental executive actions of dubious legality, or piecemeal budget compromises that made permanent much of Bush's tax cuts and implemented sequesters. As for foreign policy, his blundering leaves a lot for the Left to desire, as well as the Right--stuck to Bush's timetable on Iraq, expanded the stay in Afghanistan, and started new wars in Iraq and now maybe Syria.

Also, in a way, a Ted Cruz victory (if he actually won the general somehow) would necessarily mean a voter repudiation of Obama, so if Cruz is the GOP's Obama, that means after eight years of "success" we'd have another Obama of the Left, with both Houses of Congress, elected.

I don't know if I'd want to see the Right's equivalent of that. Especially when we really need entitlement and tax reform sooner rather than later.

rhhardin said...

Obviously Cruz has never heard French Country Music.

traditionalguy said...

The problem is Cruz wants to mix support from Nashville/Texas culture with the Northeastern culture. That is not going to work as well as Scott walker's finessing the issue as if they are the same because in Walker the two are the same.



Tank said...

Shanna said...

Why don't you point out the pro-war lyrics?

Seriously. It wasn't pro war at all. It was 'this sad thing happened, let's sing about it'. I just hate the song. Sap, sap, sap.


LOL, really. Jackson himself talked about his sappiness at Carnegie Hall in relation to one of his sad love songs. His explanation: beats me, that's what comes out of me.

It's really a touchy feely kind of song. I wonder if he's a secret leftist? Yiiiiiii !!!

bleh said...

I don't understand why Republicans are shocked ... SHOCKED ... that Democrats would portray the GOP nominee as a "crazy Republican after all." Democrats are trying to win elections by frightening moderates and independents.

Why make their task even easier by actually nominating a "crazy Republican" like Cruz?

A guy like Christie, who has his own problems as a candidate, could simply not be branded a "crazy Republican." That label would not stick, in part because of his record but also because of Christie's ability to speak directly to voters and assure them that he's a regular dude. Romney, on the other hand, was very rich and seemed stuffy, the kind of guy dipshit populists would think is cutting secret deals in smoke-filled rooms at the country club.

buwaya said...

Machine,
Consider it from a more interesting perspective. All artists pander to their audience, on one level or another. He who pays the piper, etc.
What you are saying, looking at it deeper, is that you don't care for the audience to which they pander.
Consider yourself as an audience, and examine your own preferences and probable reactions and emotions, and think whether your own nature, stripped of the ingrained and irrational, is in fact superior to theirs.

phantommut said...

This was a selling point; now, though, I've got no real bargaining power with other Republican/moderate/conservative voters because: "we tried your way. It didn't work." "If we're going to have people claim that our nominee is a super right wing radical, we might as well NOMINATE one," etc., etc.

The problem is you also have no bargaining power with the Democratic establishment either. Professional Democrats have built this incredibly tense coalition of narrow interest groups who are passionate about often incompatible issues. To keep the whole thing cohesive on a national level the only real tool they have is demonization of anything that doesn't have a (D) after it's name. That's why it's perfectly acceptable to label Cruz as a "white hispanic", Clarence Thomas as a house negro, Sarah Palin as a stupid broad, Mitt Romney (and all Mormons, actually) as crazy cultists, etc.

It's gotten to the point that you really can't find a "good Republican" anywhere any more (at least according to the press, which is by affiliation and donations at least 90% Democratic). The closest thing out there is probably Chris Christie, who more or less kissed Obama's ring post-Sandy.

Nope. The two-party system has left you well and truly hosed. But you probably won't consider working with and for Libertarians, because crazy drugged-out heavily armed hippy freaks. And those Tea Partiers are just greedy white bastards.

Matt Sablan said...

"A guy like Christie, who has his own problems as a candidate, could simply not be branded a "crazy Republican.""

-- I thought that about blue state Romney and McCain, known for his work with Ted Kennedy and other Democrats and being willing to challenge his own caucus.

I was wrong.

Unknown said...

"Hmm...I tend to look to my radio presets and music library for good tunes, not to have my worldview affirmed."

Yes, of course, whether or not you agree with the sentiments expressed in a song has no bearing whatsoever on if you consider it a "good tune."

buster said...

Brando said:

"Growing up, we defined "classic rock" as any rock and roll from 1964-1980."

Odd definition that excludes Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Buddy Holly, Bill Haley, etc., etc.

phantommut said...

Can someone explain to me in what way, exactly, Ted Cruz is beyond the pale of reasonability?

Matt Sablan said...

He's probably not beyond the pale; I might even be able to be persuaded to like him.

Most of the music I listened to growing up was my parents music. My knowledge of music ends right about when I was born.

Gahrie said...

I've heard that Ted Cruz hates puppy dogs, kittens, hot dogs, apple pie and motherhood. There are also rumors that he worships Satan and sacrifices minority children in hideous blood rituals. Worst of all, I've heard he is a Conservative Republican.

Roughcoat said...

The best music to come out of the 9/11 attacks is William Basinki's "Disintegration Loops." Give them a listen, but before you do read what Basinski says concerning their origin. I'm not sure you can call them music, but it is something along those lines, and it strikes me as profound.

Shanna said...

could simply not be branded a "crazy Republican.""

Wrong. The media will lie and call anyone that. So we might as well pick someone we like.

I'm not sure about Cruz as a candidate, but nothing about him strikes me as crazy.

PuertoRicoSpaceport.com said...

RH Hardin said:

"If I'd Killed You When I Wanted To I'd Be Out by Now"

Other great titles include "Tears spoiled my aim"

"Get your biscuits in the over and your buns in the bed"

By Austinite Kinky Friedman

John Henry

chuckR said...

@rhhardin

try

"Can I take my gun to Heaven?"

Cracker

Gahrie said...

And that says nothing of the real tinfoil hat brigade who basically believe he is a double agent working to destroy America from the inside.

Well how do you explain his trashing of the Constitution, flouting of immigration laws, doubling our national debt, increasing poverty, failing to prosecute Wall Street criminals, insulting our allies, praising our enemies, and allowing Islamic terrorists to seize control of countries throughout the Middle East and Africa?

Brando said...

""Growing up, we defined "classic rock" as any rock and roll from 1964-1980."

Odd definition that excludes Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Buddy Holly, Bill Haley, etc., etc. "

It is, in a way--we considered classic rock distinct from "oldies". Though I suppose those genres changed since then (late '80s, early '90s).

traditionalguy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
traditionalguy said...

Crazy means anyone not under the control of the Media Talking Heads narratives.

Rebels are properly treated as crazy. Why would anyone upset the apple cart of sharing in looting by threatening to accuse people with heresy.

Now, let's go after the Koch Brothers.

rhhardin said...

The sexist words you can't use about Hillary

"Sexist words, according to the group, include: “polarizing,” “calculating,” “disingenuous,” “insincere,” “ambitious,” “inevitable,” “entitled,” “over confident,” “secretive,” will do anything to win,” “represents the past,” and “out of touch.”"

Okay word, cunt.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

There are only two kinds of music: there's country, and then you got your fusion jazz.

Tank said...

Brando said...

""Growing up, we defined "classic rock" as any rock and roll from 1964-1980."

Odd definition that excludes Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Buddy Holly, Bill Haley, etc., etc. "


Gotta admit, I think of Classic Rock as the music that came after that stuff. That stuff I think of as the original rock and roll, which a bunch of largely white guys stole from a bunch of largely black guys.

Anthony said...

I don't know how many times I've heard the phrase "Today's music sucks (compared to what it was when I was young)" over my 53 years, but I've been hearing it the entire time. I'm pretty certain even the Romans were lodging the same complaints.

traditionalguy said...

The country and western music lovers base emotion is problematic to others. But it cares less whom is afraid of them. You are welcome to join them or not. Cruz says he wants to join them, and he is welcomed.

You still need educated brainpower applied to a strategy and to tactics. But you first need the will to attack the enemy or you have nothing.

George Patton who was a very smart man learned that he had to communicate in an uneducated language to motivate his soldiers into believe him to be a competant fighter.

Unknown said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vS-zEH8YmiM

Brando said...

One reason the Dems were able to paint Romney, McCain and Dole as right wingers was that in the primaries they all had to prove their conservative bona fides to the right wing of the party, and played right into that image for the general electorate. They were torn between a conservative wing that didn't really trust them and a moderate general electorate who figured they either were more right wing than previously thought, or at least were beholden to that wing.

Cruz of course wouldn't have that problem, if he found a way to appeal beyond the party's right flank. But he has other problems--the right has a number of candidates to choose from, and he seems to delight in having the establishment against him and this is a not insignificant part of the party. Reagan (or Obama, who Cruz is also compared to by his supporters) had crossover appeal with the party's moderates, and could straddle that line.

The other problem has nothing to do with his politics. It's his approach.

Cruz is obviously not stupid, and I don't think he's crazy, but he doesn't give the impression of a man who wants to actually achieve any conservative goals. His strategy seems to be "use lofty arguments to get others onto our side" which actually sounds Obamist, and would resonate more if I saw him actually accomplishing this. Otherwise, it's preach to the choir, be a hero to a small slab of the electorate, but if anyone's going to get things done it'll be without Cruz's help.

Maybe that judgment will be proven wrong over the coming months, but we'll see.

Brando said...

"I don't know how many times I've heard the phrase "Today's music sucks (compared to what it was when I was young)" over my 53 years, but I've been hearing it the entire time. I'm pretty certain even the Romans were lodging the same complaints."

I read somewhere (so you know it's true!) that there was a scientific basis for this--an inability to like new music after a certain age, because our ability to appreciate new harmonies changes.

President-Mom-Jeans said...

That is very insensitive of you calling Bitchtits "thick" Meade.

He prefers to be called "big boned" or "husky" or "Rubenesque."

That is "ugly" of you Meade. Show some respect.

I Callahan said...

Why make their task even easier by actually nominating a "crazy Republican" like Cruz?

If they're going to do the EXACT same thing no matter what, then what difference does it really make?

To the Dems, ALL republicans are crazy, whether you're as moderate as John McCain or as conservative as Ted Cruz. May as well get the real thing if that's the case.

Insufficiently Sensitive said...

By 9/11, rock music had dug itself into the perfection of nearly forty years of transgressive anti-establishment, frequently anti-American progressivism. It continued along those rails, relishing its anti-Bush successes.

When the Dixie Chicks tried cashing in on that mindset by adding a bluegrass sugar-coating to the anti-Bush groupthink, the country audience wouldn't have it. I can see Cruz appreciating that reaction, which he certainly shared.

Charlie Currie said...

I found it very easy to transition from The Eagles, The Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jackson Brown, Linda Ronstadt, J D Souther, The Byrds, Poco, CSN, Neil Young, Allman Brothers, Joni Mitchell...you get the picture...to modern country...a melody you can hum and lyrics you can sing in front of your mother and your daughter.

But, then again, I went to a Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars concert one night and then to a Bette Midler concert the next (with Barry Manilow on piano) and enjoy them equally...so there's that.

Brando said...

"Gotta admit, I think of Classic Rock as the music that came after that stuff. That stuff I think of as the original rock and roll, which a bunch of largely white guys stole from a bunch of largely black guys."

Yeah--Zeppelin, Hendrix, Aerosmith I always thought of as classic rock. Elvis, Chuck Berry--more oldies. Beatles I guess straddled the two.

The idea though that rock and roll was "stolen" from blacks is pretty rich--where did these black singers get their instruments, lyrics and styles from, if not originally white culture? Were they playing rock in Africa before the whites showed up?

Culture from various groups is often shared and influenced by others--it wasn't "stealing" when rock bands in the '60s started using the sitar, nor was Richie Valens a thief by using English vocals. Influences should be considered good things. Anyone bitching about cultural appropriation ought to go live in some cave where they don't have to worry about anyone stealing their thoughts from them except bats.

Insufficiently Sensitive said...

I read somewhere (so you know it's true!) that there was a scientific basis for this--an inability to like new music after a certain age, because our ability to appreciate new harmonies changes.

There's a simpler explanation. The music of the years of one's mating rituals is the key. Changes to THAT music are unwelcome in later ages.

Mountain Maven said...

After 9/11 it was time to take sides.

That is when I dumped NPR and their faux neutrality.

And 9/11 illuminated the left wing contempt for America that permeates most of the music industry.

garage mahal said...

He prefers to be called "big boned" or "husky" or "Rubenesque."

I'll post a pic right now and you do the same. Let's see who is in better shape. Unless you're a anonymous internet coward, as most people suspect.

Sebastian said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Simon said...

phantommut said...
"Can someone explain to me in what way, exactly, Ted Cruz is beyond the pale of reasonability?

Well, for example, he says things like "audit the fed" and "repeal common core" even though there's nothing to audit and nothing to repeal. See, here's the problem: There are two Ted Cruzes. There's the careful appellate advocate who was a rising star in FedSoc a few years ago, who argued Medellin like a boss, who seemed like the next John Roberts. And then there's the slapdash loudmouth who became a rising star in the tea party, who goes for the soundbite no matter that it creates tension with the facts. And I'd really like to know: Which is the act? Who's the real Ted Cruz?

traditionalguy said...

Interestingly, we have had one GOP nominee who was known to be crazy. But he tried to hide it behind a a sincere moderate mask.

That would be John McCain, whom the Professor spotted easily.

Sebastian said...

"Today's music sucks"

Sure.

But Easter 1727, summer of 1788, June 1865: those were the days.

Simon said...

President-Mom-Jeans said...
'[Garage] prefers to be called "big boned" or "husky" or "Rubenesque."'

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Simon said...

traditionalguy said...
"Interestingly, we have had one GOP nominee who was known to be crazy. But he tried to hide it behind a a sincere moderate mask."

I found it hilarious to read Amy Davidson's article on Cruz the other day that uses comments by Lindsay Graham at a panel Amy moderated as a vehicle for mocksing Cruz as a bit crazy, a bit unstable. "Ted with nukes, hmm. Ted with nukes." Graham being such a straight arrow by contrast, is the implication. But wasn't it at that very same conference that Graham threatened that as President he would increase the military budget by a means somewhere between shanghaiing Congress and staging an outright coup? Of all the nutty things any Republican has said in recent years, that's up there with "legitimate rape" and "can't she swallow the camera."

buwaya said...

"There's the careful appellate advocate who was a rising star in FedSoc a few years ago, who argued Medellin like a boss, who seemed like the next John Roberts."

This aspect of Mr. Cruz requires the ability to "argue Medellin like a boss". The other aspect you seem to object to does not require this ability. But the ability has not gone away. The brain surgeon who likes to play tiddlywinks is no less a brain surgeon after a game of tiddlywinks.

Fen said...

I don't care. We are looking for a good non-corrupt administrator, not another celebrity.

J. Farmer said...

@Gahrie:

"Well how do you explain his trashing of the Constitution, flouting of immigration laws, doubling our national debt, increasing poverty, failing to prosecute Wall Street criminals, insulting our allies, praising our enemies, and allowing Islamic terrorists to seize control of countries throughout the Middle East and Africa?"

You could make a list akin to this for virtually any administration of the last half-century. The problem with our tribal politics is that for a lot of people, when it is "their guy" in the White House, the list often becomes a bunch of debatable talking points. And then when the "other guy" is in office, the same list becomes proof positive of what a horrible/evil/stupid/corrupt person he is.

Smilin' Jack said...

""I grew up listening to classic rock, and I'll tell you sort of an odd story: My music taste changed on 9/11.""

Look, I can understand how the trauma of 9/11 might lead a man to fuck chickens and marry his sister. But actually listening to the music is going too far.

Fen said...

Garage: "I'll post a pic right now and you do the same. Let's see who is in better shape. Unless you're a anonymous internet coward, as most people suspect"

Heh. Have to say, it's always amusing to watch commenters reduce Garage to a 12yr old xbox trash-talker. Nice move.

buwaya said...

There is nothing to repeal
From your National Review link -

"The Obama administration used federal grants and regulatory waivers (the latter, oddly, unmentioned by Strauss) to encourage state participation. Cruz wants to end that."

So there is indeed something to "repeal". Congress can easily pass a law requiring the departments involved to cease with the grants and waivers for this purpose. Or a President Cruz, or whoever, can order this practice stopped. It seems that the objection is to terminology, which seems a bit pettifogging.

As for auditing the Fed - well, yes indeed. It would be

JSD said...

Brando - “The idea though that rock and roll was "stolen" from blacks is pretty rich--where did these black singers get their instruments, lyrics and styles from, if not originally white culture? Were they playing rock in Africa before the whites showed up?”

Actually yes. Rock & roll is based on 12 bar blues. The exact origin of 12 bar blues is unknown, but it most likely originated from the songs of black field laborers in about 1900. It was largely acoustic until the 1950’s when it went electric in Chicago. Willie Dixon, Freddy King Little Walter. It’s amazing how well their recordings from the 1950’s stand up today.

hombre said...

The only real issue is why he didn't make the transition sooner. The purveyors of most rock music line up nicely with other show biz progressives. Most country singers do not.

I can certainly see how for Jaltcoh and the Professor the nature of his conversion would seem central to his fitness for President. After all we know this type of keen discernment led at least one of them to vote for Obama at least once.

the wolf said...

Certainly no worse than John Kerry's claim that he's a big fan of rap music.

bleh said...

"Actually yes. Rock & roll is based on 12 bar blues. The exact origin of 12 bar blues is unknown, but it most likely originated from the songs of black field laborers in about 1900. It was largely acoustic until the 1950’s when it went electric in Chicago. Willie Dixon, Freddy King Little Walter. It’s amazing how well their recordings from the 1950’s stand up today."

Chicago is in Africa?

Whitey Sepulchre said...

Every time I get in the car I hit my head on the roof and it hurts. A lot. Then I seem to always shut the door on my fingers. That hurts too.

Brando said...

"Actually yes. Rock & roll is based on 12 bar blues. The exact origin of 12 bar blues is unknown, but it most likely originated from the songs of black field laborers in about 1900. It was largely acoustic until the 1950’s when it went electric in Chicago. Willie Dixon, Freddy King Little Walter. It’s amazing how well their recordings from the 1950’s stand up today."

My point wasn't that black artists didn't have a significant impact in the origination of rock and roll (among other American music forms) but that even those black artists "borrowed" from white culture. And it's not a bad thing--every art form and innovation does and should be influenced by what came before, from any culture. To call it "stealing" is to imply that every culture should be closed off from one another, and races should not mix, and we should all be separate but equal.

What I'm saying is leftist thought is riddled with racism and they would find good company with Theodore Bilbo.

Brando said...

"I'll post a pic right now and you do the same. Let's see who is in better shape. Unless you're a anonymous internet coward, as most people suspect"

Is anyone going to trust any photo posted here? It's not as though we can't all just lie, and say we're Special Forces operatives turned millionaire inventors with plenty of hot chicks partying with us all the time.

Not me though, all that's true about me. I'm so busy with my hot chicks and massive fortune and memoirs about special forces stuff that I barely have time to comment on this blog...

clint said...

I'm not sure I could explain why, but I made the same musical transition at the same time.

I believed at the time that the problem was I wanted upbeat and happy music, and rock just wasn't providing that anymore -- it was all negativity all the time.

But I was also looking to get away from the "it's Vietnam again!" music trend from the artists I'd previously listened to.

So, yeah -- this feels genuine to me.

buwaya said...

On cultural markers vs relevant education, or competence -

The objection to the likes of Sarah Palin or the fans of country music seems to be entirely a matter of tribal signalling.

It is not clear at all that the sort of knowledge that the cultural elite, as we define them in this society, are significantly relevant to the task of national leadership.
Let us consider for instance what passes for the teaching of history and foreign cultures. You can question a person who claims familiarity with French history and culture, and they will probably be able to distinguish Balzac from Zola. This will impress some of the readers of the NYT. But its most unlikely that they will be able to explain the deficiencies of the French General Staff system in 1940, and the national tendency to create such systems, and the reasons why this is so. This is actually relevant information to a statesman. The NYT tribe is no less incompetent than the fans of Toby Kieth to determine which cultural markers are of practical significance.
I can make a better case I think, that a leader who knows how to (literally) shoot straight and weld competently has more relevant abilities for leading a nation, than knowing Balzac from Zola.

J. Farmer said...

The "cultural appropriation" line is one of the more obnoxious complaints of the SJW crowd and their endless search for microaggressions. It is patently absurd to say that rock & roll was "stolen" from anybody, when it is obviously an amalgam of African-American and white hillbilly musical styles.

Bob Ellison said...

It's OK, J. Farmer. Just let them keep whining about appropriation. That way there's more angst, which tends to produce better music for us to enjoy.

HipsterVacuum said...

Too much angst unfortunately led to emo music and some really bad Morrissey solo albums.

J. Farmer said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
J. Farmer said...

@buwaya:

"The objection to the likes of Sarah Palin or the fans of country music seems to be entirely a matter of tribal signalling."

You are most certainly right on the signalling and a large number of the elites' attitudes towards country music. But I think the standard view of Sarah Palin as basically an ignoramus who was chosen largely for her identity politics traits and not on any real measure of competence or ability is accurate.

Heather Macdonald, I thought, nailed it squarely on the head in City Journal when she wrote about the Palin phenomenon thusly:

"I know, it’s elitist to expect a candidate for president or vice president to speak like an adult... It’s even more elitist to expect a vice president to put together sentences that cohere into a minimally logical progression of thought. There was a time, however, when conservatives upheld adult standards—such as clarity of speech and thought—without apology, even in the face of the relentless downward pull of adolescent culture. But now, when a vice-presidential candidate talks like a teenager, mugs like an American Idol contestant, and traffics in syntactical dead-ends and non sequiturs, we are supposed to find her charming and authentic."

Tank said...

Brando

My point wasn't that black artists didn't have a significant impact in the origination of rock and roll (among other American music forms) but that even those black artists "borrowed" from white culture. And it's not a bad thing--every art form and innovation does and should be influenced by what came before, from any culture. To call it "stealing" is to imply that every culture should be closed off from one another, and races should not mix, and we should all be separate but equal.

You inferred much that I never intended to imply. And don't call me a leftist God Dammit.

Listen to early Eric Clapton (to pick one) and tell me he did not liberally "borrow" from Freddie and Albert King. Start with the Beano album.

Laslo Spatula said...

As Bob Dylan once sang:

I knew it had to happen
Felt the tables turnin'
Got me through my darkest hour
I heard the thunder clappin'
Felt the desert burnin'
Until you poured on me
Like a sweet sunshower

So if you're tired of the
Same old story
Turn some pages
I'll be here when you are ready
To roll with the changes


I am Laslo.

Bob Ellison said...

Since we're on the subject of borrowing/adapting/stealing music, how about that Pharrell/Thicke court case?

Or how about the entire industry of hip-hop and "sampling"?

Michael K said...

"the standard view of Sarah Palin as basically an ignoramus who was chosen largely for her identity politics traits and not on any real measure of competence or ability is accurate."

Says a supporter of Obama and Hillary Clinton !

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Shanna said...

Listen to early Eric Clapton (to pick one) and tell me he did not liberally "borrow" from Freddie and Albert King. Start with the Beano album...

I think the music discussion is interesting in light of the recent cases with Sam Smith (?) and his Tom Petty soundalike song and the Marvin Gaye ruling. I'm not sure you can create music without building on what comes before. So at what point is that building and at what is it stealing? At what point can you take a piece of music or a style or what have you, and build on it without being accused of stealing?

this is obviously still being worked out and people have different opinions.

Of course, country music has a pretty well known history of traveling melodies but no one seems to complain.

Carl Pham said...

A surprising strain of fear and loathing in Althouse's reaction to Cruz. I wonder how she feels threatened?

buwaya said...

When Bonaparte spoke to his men he spoke in their idiom. Likewise when Caesar spoke to his. Both were able to speak to the educated men in their idiom as well. But the complaint about the idiom is relevant only to the audience in question. The educated have no less a weakness for mistaking the book for its cover.

Palin was able to manage a state government, organize popular legislative changes and changes in regulation in her state, that were popular with the people and as far as I know were not subsequently changed back. In an ideal world it is by their deeds that one should know someone.

As for deeds - In my career I have mainly had to deal with "hard" matters - things and energy. As it happens I know who in the US provides the essentials of human existence - water, food, fuel, tools, and the distribution of these, from the point of production to the actual necessary management of each process. These people are Palins people, nearly to a man. Without these ants the grasshopper cultural elite which so despises them would literally die over a winter.

It is absurd to complain about someones sentences, when one could not hope to rebuild a diesel engine like they can. We need working diesel engines more than we need sentences.

Laslo Spatula said...

As Bob Dylan once sang:

Bored As Hell And I Wanna Get Ill
So I Went To A Spot Where Ma Homeboys Chill
The Fellas Out There Makin Dat Dollar
I Pulled Up In Ma 6 Fo' Impala
They Greet Me Wit A 40 And I Start Drinkin
And From The 8 Ball, My Breath Starts Stinkin
Left To Get Ma Girl To Rock That Body
Before I Left, I Hit The Bac-Ardi
Went To Her House To Get Her Out Of The Pad
Dumb Hoe Said Somethin That Made Me Mad
She Said Somethin That I Couldnt Believe
So I Grabbed The Stupid Bitch By Her Nappy-Ass Weave
She Started Talkin Shit, Wouldnt You Know
Reached Back Like A Pimp, Slapped The Hoe
Her Father Jumped Up And He Started To Shout
So I Threw A Right Cross And Knocked His Old-Ass Out


I am Laslo.

Shanna said...

Or how about the entire industry of hip-hop and "sampling"?

I'll never forget hearing the annie song on the radio one day and thinking wtf until I figured out what was going on...

Brando said...

"You inferred much that I never intended to imply. And don't call me a leftist God Dammit."

I actually didn't infer that you expressed those opinions (against "appropriation" of other cultures). I'm just expressing my disdain for those who do.

Michael K said...

For Mr "Nothing to Repeal."

getting rid of all federal inducements for states to adopt or keep Common Core. The Obama administration used federal grants and regulatory waivers (the latter, oddly, unmentioned by Strauss) to encourage state participation. Cruz wants to end that.

My grandson's teacher (4th grade I believe) told his mother that she cannot do the Common Core math problems but is not allowed to use traditional methods and she suggested his mother teach him math.

Brando said...

"Or how about the entire industry of hip-hop and "sampling"?"

I'm no expert on the IP issues involved--at what point it becomes "infringement" of another song--but as far as the cultural appropriation issue itself, any amount of "sampling" or "remaking" or "reinventing" is fair game. Who would want music completely free of any influence, and is that even possible?

Bob Ellison said...

Brando, a good start would be re-writing all copyright and patent code. As those laws stand, they senselessly sustain monopoly.

J. Farmer said...

@Michael K:

"'the standard view of Sarah Palin as basically an ignoramus who was chosen largely for her identity politics traits and not on any real measure of competence or ability is accurate.'

Says a supporter of Obama and Hillary Clinton !"

Do me a favor and explain to me how I am, in any way, a "supporter" of Obama and Hillary Clinton. In fact, do me a further favor and try to get your brain outside of the left/right, Dem/Repub way of thinking. You will find yourself less perennially confused.

Anonymous said...

I've gravitated to country more myself. And, in retrospect, at about the same time. I think a lot of it had to do with the death of the guitar in modern pop and rock 'n roll.
Guitars have been a life-long love. They bring can be edgy, warm, sentimental, angry. Sometimes all of these at once.

There's something sterile in those genres these days. There is some of it in modern country too. Just not as much.
A lack of human-ness.

buwaya said...

Our boy turned into a fanatic guitarist (electric and acoustic), now he is leaning banjo. He impresses me, anyway.

Our girl has always been able to play anything in minutes it seems. These days she has mostly dumped the viola for mandolin.

Maybe this is part of a trend.

Franklin said...

"Heh. Have to say, it's always amusing to watch commenters reduce Garage to a 12yr old xbox trash-talker. Nice move."

U wot m8? I'll hook u in teh gabber i sware on me mum.

Big Mike said...

@buwaya, when they take up the steel guitar, then you'll know.

garage mahal said...

"Heh. Have to say, it's always amusing to watch commenters reduce Garage to a 12yr old xbox trash-talker. Nice move."

Amusing you take issue with me instead of the dickless, anonymous cowards that follow me around this blog constantly.

chickelit said...

My voting patterns certainly changed after 9/11. I don't think I'm alone either. Dems never seem to want to talk about how and why a lot of people changed politically and why their party -- to this day -- remains the party mostly ashamed of America's past.

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