February 4, 2010

"Boa Sr epitomised a totality of humanity in all its hues and with a richness...."

The last link of a 65,000-year-long chain.

MORE: Here, including an audio clip, described — accurately — as "haunting."

10 comments:

bagoh20 said...

Hey, if that language is extinct, we can use it for all our cussin' and nobdy will get offended...for at least a week.

SteveR said...

I am realistic about the inevitable loss of these things but its sad when its represented by the death of a person. I'm a softy and not so young anymore.

EDH said...

Now clear your minds, it knows what scares you.

Sounds like the "haunting voice" of Zelda Rubinstein.

May 28, 1933 - January 27, 2010.

rhhardin said...

A richness that apparently was a waste of resources.

Revenant said...

Didn't the language effectively die off when the next-to-last speaker of it passed away?

edutcher said...

Right or wrong, this is evolution at work. Other languages proved more useful and it passed out of existence.

Sic transit gloria

WV "cupenda" What happens when you turn the page of the paper and it brushes against your coffee.

Pogo said...

'People love you when they know you're leaving soon.'

John Gorka

paul a'barge said...

Who cares?

English is the official language of Planet Earth anyway.

Clyde said...

Well, Paul, it's the official language for half a billion of us anyway, give or take. Which leaves about 13 out of 14 people in the world speaking something else. More than a billion are estimated to speak Mandarin Chinese, so if there's an Official Language of Planet Earth, that's probably it. The average person in the world is a Chinese man, after all.

Not that I'm not as chauvinistic about my native language as the next guy! I feel blessed to be born an American and an English speaker.

Methadras said...

Um, why didn't she make it on the endangered species list? Well, I guess we've seen the fatal flaw in the 65k year plan of these people. Is it a waste? Not really. Instead of weeping at what was lost in term of the last linguistic survivor of this language, instead what should be asked is, what did these people contribute and has that been lasting?

Personally, I'd like to see the uselessness of the french language evaporate, but apparently the french are more cogent in keeping themselves alive than these 65k year old peoples. Sucks to be them.