January 7, 2016

"I learned that cow dung cakes can now be ordered on the Indian Amazon website."

"Out of curiosity, I ordered 6 pieces. It cost me 236 rupees, about $4."
I called the local office of Amazon and spoke to Jaideep, who was very courteous and happy to answer my questions. He said, "Sir, this is a new product that Amazon is selling and they are getting a lot of orders from folks in urban areas where it is not so easy to find cow dung cakes." When I asked him what people wanted it for, he said, "They use it for religious purposes only."
Dried cow dung is used as a cooking fuel in rural areas, but it's not what people in urban areas want for cooking. They have some purification of a house and house-warming rituals — "Since cows are considered to be holy by Hindus, their dung is also sacred."

19 comments:

AllenS said...

HOLY SHIT!

traditionalguy said...

A Cow God needs what a Cow God needs. And apparently the main need of Cow Gods is strict vegetarian rules outlawing the blasphemy of eating animals, ESPECIALLY the criminal act of eating Cow. Remember that while you exercise your religious discipline of Yoga

And also remember, that if Global Warming happens at all, it happens because anti-Beef Eating religious laws are not being enforced.

Michael McClain said...

As if we didn't have enough bullshit to deal with.

pm317 said...

Unlike the capitalists cows in the western world, these cows are truly grass-fed. So their poops are also kind of desiccated grass and used for fuel. Little houses along the streets in villages are lined with these patties on the wall pasted to dry. Poor people find purpose for even cow poop. The religious thing attached to it is just bogus (or marketing?).

EDH said...

No surprise, since we're all about to be served a shit sandwich.

Ipso Fatso said...

'"... their dung is also sacred."'

For the record, so is mine and it doesn't stink!!!!

If you would like to order any of my sacred fecal material call 1.800.EAT.SHIT.

I am not Laslo.

dbp said...

When I visited India, these dung cakes were shaped (somehow) into hexagons. One would see great stacks of dried cakes, presumably for fuel. I noticed that they would also use them to line garden paths. I speculate that urban people might want a few to "decorate" their small garden space or use them for some kind of puja. The pujas I have participated in featured honey, milk, rice, flower petals, ghee, coconuts, bananas and colored powders. No dung though.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

Dung cakes is an interesting usage. We called them cow pies on the family farm in Iowa. There was an art to selecting one that was dry on the outside but moist on the inside so that you could pick it up without residue and have it stick on impact when flung at your brother or sister.

jacksonjay said...

This will soon become the latest, must have, for the sciencey cool kids. Western, immaculate conception religion is very high horse ignorant. Sacred Cow, Shit Burning Third World religion is very exotic.

Actually, tattoos in Chinese characters, Arabic or tribal patterns is probably a first, must have.

pm317 said...

Cue all the rich cow eating mfers from the first world making fun of poor people and their ways to survive.

and oh, snakes and snake charmers too.

jacksonjay said...

This will soon become the latest, must have, for the sciencey cool kids. Western, immaculate conception religion is very high horse ignorant. Sacred Cow, Shit Burning Third World religion is very exotic.

Actually, tattoos in Chinese characters, Arabic or tribal patterns is probably a first, must have.

pellehDin said...

"Since cows are considered to be holy by Hindus, their dung is also sacred."

Sounds a lot how MSM feels about the Clintons.

Bill said...

When I was in the Boy Scouts, we used desiccated cow plops as Frisbees.

Darrell said...

Somebody tip Gwyneth.

Darrell said...

The elite put the dung or liquid mess in cooking gas generators and pipe it into the house with a rubber hose.

mikee said...

I recall the wonderful scent of burning incense issuing from the thurible I held as an altar boy, and compare it to the wonderful scent of burning cow dung issuing from rural villages in India I passed on my way to Bangalore, and to the wonderful scent of skunk detected from afar in my rural childhood home in North Carolina, and the balsam-honey scent of a young woman's hair from an early infatuation.

Scent is very evocative of past experience, and memory of scent is memory of experience.

Shawn Levasseur said...

So, that bag of flaming poo on my front porch steps was actually a housewarming gift?

Eustace Chilke said...

Smells like money.

Nancy Reyes said...

dried cow dung is used as a paste for cleaning in Africa and Asia: It dries to cement like hardness and does not smell. Similar

https://ancienthealth.wordpress.com/2014/04/15/cow-dung-gobar-for-health/