January 2, 2014

Who is tempted by Colorado pot tourism?

Have you been waiting since the 60s for pot to become legal? Are you, like me, in your 60s and from the 60s and hoping that the day will arrive when you can walk into a nice little shop, buy some marijuana, and consume it without the need for any of the old rebellious spirit that enlivened us when we were Flower Children? Do you, unlike me, think that day has come if only you go to Colorado?
As Colorado becomes the first state in the nation to allow recreational marijuana sales beginning Jan. 1, a budding pool of "potrepreneurs" have high hopes for an influx of out-of-town pot tourists.

Colorado Highlife Tours, which promises “fun, affordable and discreet” cannabis-centered excursions, is expanding its private and public limo and bus tours.

“You’ll be able to buy a little pot here and there, see a commercial grow, visit iconic Colorado landmarks and take lots of pictures,” said company owner Timothy Vee. “It will be like a Napa Valley wine tour.”
As you may know, I'm a travel skeptic, and these potrepreneurs and "Highlife Tours" only heighten my aversion. Imagine these guys wrangling you with a crowd of shambling boomers and bullshitting about the fine varietals of local weed. But you could put together your own road trip to Colorado. In fact, Colorado is the main place I've headed on my personal road trips, even before I married Meade, who has family in Colorado. Despite our lack of general enthusiasm for travel, we do drive to Colorado, and now when we drive to Colorado, as we will again soon, you're going to think we're pot tourists.



That was back in 2011, wandering around Leadville, catching some shots of the scenery, including a pot shop — medical only back then. We intend to return to Colorado soon, but we're not going to enter these shops, now open for "recreational" users, and I don't like the fact that going to Colorado triggers a suspicion that that's what we're doing.

It's still a federal crime to possess marijuana, and if I were inclined to commit crimes, I wouldn't do it as conspicuously as openly traveling to Colorado, going into a shop where I may have to wait in a line of aging Boomer pot tourists, showing my ID, and perhaps appearing on surveillance cameras. I'd try to be inconspicuous, which means I'd stay home and use the same damned black market that's been available all along.

But I'm not inclined to commit crimes, and I haven't so much as touched an illegal drug since a stranger tried to pass me a joint when The Kinks played the Felt Forum in 1974, which was probably before the President of the United States even began taking drugs.

87 comments:

damikesc said...

Colorado? If I want to go freeze my ass off in the snow, I'll go somewhere they wouldn't vote for an imbecile like Schweitzer. Either Dakota. Montana. Wyoming.

madAsHell said...

I really don't care about reefers.

Now, when someone says they have visited Thailand, that's when it start making judgments.

madAsHell said...

aaaarrrrggghhh.....when I, not when it!!

John said...

And so, we are left with the only possible explanation... flashbacks! Pay now. Pay later. Pay again later.

El Pollo Raylan said...

I thought you two liked federalism and diversity and celebrated Colorado's marriage freedom -- even traveling there to get married?

Pot.Kettle.Black

Shouting Thomas said...

Crime is fun.

I've already done much worse than the medicinal herb.

My lowly position on this orb gives me the freedom to not worry much about whether I should obey all the laws.

It takes too much time to figure out what laws I'm supposed to follow.

Tim said...

Schweitzer is from Montana. We aren't too fond of him either although the Demos got him elected twice - blessed by poor timing and weak opponents. (and third party true believers that cost the Repubs the election)

Beta Rube said...

I heard on the news it's selling for 400.00 an ounce. It was 35.00 for Colombian when I quit.

Clayton Hennesey said...

What's the difference between Colorado and virtually non-policed marijuana markets everywhere else? Price? For how long?

MadisonMan said...

What you should do, to be inconspicuous, is dress Meade in a cheese bra (sorry Meade) and position him on the other side of the street from the Pot Store.

Then you can enter the Pot Store un-seen. It's called a diversion.

Make sure you're wearing a flowing dress -- maybe billows of yellow organza -- and a big straw hat (and flowers in your hair) so CCTv cameras really can't tell who/what you are.

MadisonMan said...

Oh, but wait a minute.

By my posting it here, NSA will be on the look-out for precisely this kind of thing.

My apologies for spoiling a perfectly good plan.

If I come up with any others, I'll write them on a piece of paper and slip it under your windshield wiper just as snow starts to fall at night (so CCTvs don't see me doing it)

lemondog said...

So who are predominate customers... boomers or younger?

ajs said...

Speculation about pot tourism is bad enough, but I *moved to* Colorado in the fall, and constantly hear these kinds of comments about reasons. And, zero interest by me in visiting one of these shops.

Lucien said...

Drug prohibition is such an enduringly stupid idea that has done so much harm to our republic that every blow struck against it is worth cheering. But if I'm going to go all the way to Colorado, there had better be some skiing involved.

surfed said...

Better bud here at home. A Lt cheaper too. Colorado is an awesome place for having the "inland" moniker hung over its shoulders. But its a long drive for this 60 year old to toke a buzz to "Back in Mobile with the Memphis Blues again. Pass at this stage of the game. But I could see how a road trip to stoner State could be a fun ramble for a bunch of youngsters...

mrs. e said...

"I don't like the fact that going to Colorado triggers a suspicion that that's what we're doing."

Relax, most of what you think others are thinking of you, isn't happening.

lemondog said...

Can buy eighth of an ounce at one time but is there a time-limit on the number of purchases made?

Ann Althouse said...

"But I could see how a road trip…"

Road trip ≈ driving under the influence.

Stay home!

Sorun said...

Do they sell snacks in those shops? They should, both for the munchies and so people can say they only went in for a Snickers.

surfed said...

Addendum - I need a senior phone with bigger letters. Can't type on these things worth squat. That would be lot "lot" instead "Lt", "it's" instead of "its" and to be consistent the word "Again" should have been capitalized and with a quotation mark. Sheesh, the elementary nuns made me anal retentive about this stuff.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

>> The Kinks played the Felt Forum in 1974, which was probably before the President of the United States even began taking drugs. <<

Why do you think President Nixon erased those 18 minutes?

Haldeman took a very long draw, and an argument ensued, with a long Nixon harangue about how Haldeman was bogarting the joint like he was an official in the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

That's why President Ford had to grant Nixon so broad a pardon, to cover the illegal drug use. And that's what Nixon meant when he told Frost that when the President of the United States does it, it's not illegal.

gerry said...

Imagine these guys wrangling you with a crowd of shambling boomers and bullshitting about the fine varietals of local weed.

Wow. Harsh.

But it makes me smile, as I imagine a crowd of aging boomers (and I'm one) piling off the bus at the Holiday Inn Express shuffling canes, walkers, and making sure the colostomies don't leak as they jockey for positions in the restroom lines before they climb back onto the bus to go to some Mary Jane Resort to get stoned...and overpaying for everything.

"Fine varietals"...a piquant bouquet with hints of blugrass, crabgrass, with a robust zoysia finish. Say, are you going to eat all of that chili dog?

LarsPorsena said...

The state police of every state bordering Colorado will have a special greeting program on all the interstates leaving CO.

$9,000,000,000 Write Off said...

The linked FAQ does not say that "It's still a federal crime to possess marijuana".

And I don't think "possession" of pot is a Federal crime, though I haven't looked into it much.

Jim said...

We were informed at work that CO pot was a no no. As the possessor of a security clearance, we were informed in no uncertain terms that use in CO would jeopardize our clearances, and hence out jobs. It's not just a good idea, it's the law.

phx said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
RecChief said...

When yo umake statements like this : "Are you, like me, in your 60s and from the 60s and hoping that the day will arrive when you can walk into a nice little shop, buy some marijuana, and consume it without the need for any of the old rebellious spirit that enlivened us when we were Flower Children?" What other conclusion can be reached?

El Camino Real said...

Psssst... you don't have to go to Colorado or Washington State to buy pot.

There may even be some available for sale in Madison.

Ann Althouse said...

Which is why I wrote: "I'd try to be inconspicuous, which means I'd stay home and use the same damned black market that's been available all along."

Ann Althouse said...

I think it makes no sense to flaunt your criminal activity. It may seem "more" illegal in your home state, but that keeps you hidden.

As long as it's still criminal, I can't imagine thinking it's fine to go out and do something openly. You are better off sticking to your hometown black market.

Not that I do that. I don't do that either.

EDH said...

"Mandela... came out pretty hate-free, though, ready to heal...

A lot of people don't realize this, but...

You can put your weed in there".

William said...

Are there really that many boomers who still use marijuana? Isn't that a drug you grow out of?.....Other than its illegality there was never anything truly stylish or mind expanding about pot. Both it's benefits and its dangers have been hyped.

Shouting Thomas said...

I'm tempted!

Oso Negro said...

Given that we have a whole state flouting Federal laws, I can see why you might be distressed. We are a long way down the slippery slope to lawlessness at this point, though. Sanctuary cities are a special grievance point for me.

The Elder said...

Uh, oh.

I'm going to see my Mom in Denver in a few weeks. I never stopped to think what some people may be thinking to be the REAL reason for my trip. This "avoiding the appearance of impropriety" thing is suddenly more difficult. Perhaps I should consult Glenn Reynolds.

On the other hand, I was always the square, goody two-shoes brother in the family and never went to the Felt Forum.

eric said...

I don't understand a company advertising pot tourism. It seems obvious that they are catering to people who are out of state. Therefore, they need to bus people in from out of state. We know that marijuana is still illegal on a federal level, but even more so, what state allows drug trafficking across borders?

How stupid are these people? You're going to advertise busing in a bunch of people who are going to buy pot, and then try and carry that pot back home? That's your business plan? And you don't expect the state police to pull you over as you head back into whatever state you came from?

Oh my.

Also, what happens four years from now when we have another President of the United States and that President decides the federal laws need to be enforced no matter if we agree with them or not? What happens to the pot selling businesses in Colorado who bought houses, cars, motorhomes, vacation homes, and stuffed their bank accounts with money during that time?

Ever heard of asset forfeiture?

You're basically making the US Federal Government a bunch of money.

gerry said...

Given that we have a whole state flouting Federal laws, I can see why you might be distressed.

Just think: marijuana laws might revive the Tenth Amendment!

And, with Obama making up Obamacare provisions that have no legal basis as he sees fit, what a fine example we have!

Lyssa said...

Are there really that many boomers who still use marijuana? Isn't that a drug you grow out of?

I'm in my 30s, and the idea of anyone past-college aged using it always struck me as pretty pathetic. The people I've met who do continue to use it certainly do nothing to change my mind on this.

Of course, I have no idea where college students get the money for this sort of thing.

Boltforge said...

LarsPorsena said...
"The state police of every state bordering Colorado will have a special greeting program on all the interstates leaving CO."

It would be interesting if states like Kansas sued Colorado for the costs. Colorado has nothing in place to handle the coming increase in stoned drivers.

One accident across the border in Kansas and I could see a billion dollar lawsuit against Colorado.

gerry said...

What happens to the pot selling businesses in Colorado who bought houses, cars, motorhomes, vacation homes, and stuffed their bank accounts with money during that time?

Will they become marijuana secessionists?

MadisonMan said...

The state police of every state bordering Colorado will have a special greeting program on all the interstates leaving CO.

They already do.

Welcome back Elder. As the youngest of my siblings, I enjoy laughing at your perspective.

Tyrone Slothrop said...

I wouldn't mind getting high again. I used to love the perfume, and the togetherness of passing around a joint. Alas, now I'm on a waiting list for a kidney transplant and I'll get kicked off if I test positive, legal or not. Old age is a bitch.

jimbino said...

Hey Ann,

Next trip to Colorado, stop at my home in Crested Butte and you can share in my homegrown and homebrew!

jimbino said...

Now that pot is legal in Colorado, somebody needs to start a business that rejects anybody who tests negative.

Must be legal, since employers now can reject persons who test positive.

K in Colorado said...

I can't resist: I guess we really are the "Mile High" state in more ways than one. ROFL

The supply issue was on the local news quite a bit. There was some concern over the lack of supply, and the shop owners wanted to make sure that the medical marijuana folks get theirs first, at a lower cost. All this will do is force people to spend the $200 to get a Rx from a doctor so they could buy it cheaper.

As for legalities, if your workplace does random drug testing to comply with some federal law (DOT or security clearances), you can and will be fired. It is still against federal law.

garage mahal said...

I just can't STAND the thought of somebody enjoying something that I don't even use. It's not fair!

Tank said...



Lyssa said...

Are there really that many boomers who still use marijuana? Isn't that a drug you grow out of?

I'm in my 30s, and the idea of anyone past-college aged using it always struck me as pretty pathetic.


Why would it be pathetic to smoke a joint at a concert, or listening to music at home, or before making love, or while hiking in a beautiful forest, or swimming in a cool lake, or playing the guitar, or picking and eating blueberries or .....?

While it's of no importance to me (other than the policy aspects), I can imagine lots of things that might be fun to do stoned.

SOJO said...

Medical weed has been legal a long time in CA - however "medical" includes Starbucks-like weed chocolate bars, weed pretzels, weed cookies for those who don't want to smoke. I never got a license because I was never huge on weed and it annoyed me to have to pretend I had a medical reason. Now that I do have a medical reason, I will probably get one eventually, but it's just another doctors appointment I don't want to have. The happiest thing at this point would be to never have to take another drug of any type.

If this were pre-medical need, the only tourism would be to stock up and cross state lines - and in a state that last time I visited still had no alcohol sold on Sundays. I don't know if that is frowned upon or not.

For those of you worried you'll be arrested or have complications because of the federal law, in CA they usually only go after the dispensaries when the local enforcement needs funding - unless you try to sell.

I'd still wait just to get the "first-adopter" syndrome out of the way.

SOJO said...

And just a warning for those of you boomers who really haven't smoked since god knows when...

THE STUFF IS STRONG NOW.

Don't think you need anything like the quantities you used to consume.

mccullough said...

Congress should at least amend the laws to exclude possession of less than 5 ounces from being a federal crime. As it stands, possession of small quantities of pot is up to the discretion of the executive branch to not charge as a federal crime. This is bad.

Scott M said...

If I read the CO state guidelines correctly, you have to have a valid ID to buy pot.

Why is CO disenfranchising the poor, the minorities, and the elderly? Shouldn't they have equal access to da chronic?

Fernandinande said...

Road trip ≈ driving under the influence.
Stay home!


Old propaganda dies a hard death.

"States That Legalized Medical Marijuana Saw Fewer Traffic Deaths, Study Says"
"The result that comes through again and again and again is [that] young adults ... drink less when marijuana is legalized and traffic fatalities go down," Rees told the Post.

donald said...

I can fly out to LA on points, rent a car, bop over to Venice Beach, cop, toodle out to Palm Springs, settle in to a nice place at the Spa Resort and Casino, get a nice room looking out at the mountain, blow a little hooter, gamble, and hit the hot springs with LA super babes (For me).

So no.

Wayworn Wanderer said...

The Kinks! My last offer was at a concert by the Who in Austin in 1980.

R.A. Crankbait said...

Out on the road today, I saw a pot shop sticker on a Cadillac.

Scott M said...

Out on the road today, I saw a pot shop sticker on a Cadillac.

Your aging-hipster ponytail is showing, Don.

ALP said...

"I'm in my 30s, and the idea of anyone past-college aged using it always struck me as pretty pathetic. The people I've met who do continue to use it certainly do nothing to change my mind on this."
**********
Do you feel the same way about college grads having wine with dinner, or a beer watching a football game?

I'd like to know: what is it about pot smoking that brings out this kind of exaggerated response, the kind regular drinkers never seem to inspire? Why is a person that continues to smoke weed after college "pathetic" yet post-college drinkers are a legitimate, massive market to be chased with commercials on national TV for an ever expanding list of cutesy, flavored vodkas?

vicari valdez said...

i don't think boomers will be the only ones taking advantage of this pot tourism.

Scott M said...

"I'd like to know: what is it about pot smoking that brings out this kind of exaggerated response, the kind regular drinkers never seem to inspire? Why is a person that continues to smoke weed after college "pathetic" yet post-college drinkers are a legitimate, massive market to be chased with commercials on national TV for an ever expanding list of cutesy, flavored vodkas?"

Because quantity has a legitimacy all it's own?

Freder Frederson said...

and now when we drive to Colorado, as we will again soon, you're going to think we're pot tourists.

Why on earth would we think this. You have abundantly clear that you think the legalization of pot is a very bad idea and have shown nothing but disdain for those who are celebrating the Colorado law.

If anything I would think you would go to Colorado to trail some out of state pot buyer and drop a dime on him as soon as he crossed the Colorado state line.

Ann Althouse said...

"Why on earth would we think this. You have abundantly clear that you think the legalization of pot is a very bad idea and have shown nothing but disdain for those who are celebrating the Colorado law."

No, you are not getting that right at all. I don't believe Colorado has the power to legalize marijuana. It has changed state law, but this is a crime under federal law. I don't like this twilight zone of law. I don't think it's fair. That has been my point over and over again, but you think something else has not only been said but had been made "abundantly clear."

So annoying! But you only drop by, Freder, to drop crap like that. How about saying something that doesn't make you look like a troll?

Meade said...

Freder Frederson said...
"If anything I would think you would go to Colorado to trail some out of state pot buyer and drop a dime on him as soon as he crossed the Colorado state line."

Yeah. Hey, what's your license plate number, Freder?

Meade said...

The Elder said...
"Uh, oh. ...I'm going to see my Mom in Denver in a few weeks. … On the other hand, I was always the square, goody two-shoes brother in the family and never went to the Felt Forum."

You were also always the one with good manners. I'm sure, if Mom passes you a doobie, you'll Just Say No Thanks.

MathMom said...

I turn 60 in February, and managed to get to this point in my life without taking a single illegal drug. Can't see the value in sacrificing my diminishing brains cells, when I need them for things like thinking.

I always thought stoned people looked ridiculous, and since my brother was a heavy user, I always smelled pot-stink oozing out of his pores. It was rank.

I don't see the value in this, and though I always wanted to live in Colorado, the Stupid there is getting too deep. Alaska, we're coming back home!

garage mahal said...

I'd like to know: what is it about pot smoking that brings out this kind of exaggerated response, the kind regular drinkers never seem to inspire?

Especially when consuming alcohol is a much, much more destructive force than pot. Maybe it's a generational thing. I've yet to hear a solid argument why pot should be illegal in the first place.

Scott M said...

I don't see the value in this, and though I always wanted to live in Colorado

Well, you never know. Northern Colorado, along with Northern California, might just get their own capitals, state birds, and quarter engravings.

eric said...

"I've yet to hear a solid argument why pot should be illegal in the first place."

Let them who have ears, hear.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/36267223

By the way, garage, just because you disagree with someone's argument, doesn't make their argument any less solid.

eric said...

Professor,

I'd really like to know if there is a Constitutional argument to be made by a State in regards to disparate treatment by the Federal Government.

For example, could one of the States that still declare abortion to be illegal reinforce that law and make an argument, "Colorado has legalized marijuana, which is against federal law. If they can violate federal law, why can't we?"

Is there any legitimacy in such an argument?

garage mahal said...

Let them who have ears, hear.

No offense, but that's one of the least convincing articles I've come across.

Smilin' Jack said...

...crowd of shambling boomers...

Ageism--the last bastion of bigotry.

As long as it's still criminal, I can't imagine thinking it's fine to go out and do something openly. You are better off sticking to your hometown black market.

Not that I do that. I don't do that either.


And we believe you, because of course criminals never lie about their criminality.

K in Colorado said...

Eric,

That is an interesting concept. If a state chooses to ignore the SCOTUS declaring a state law unconstitutional, how would the Feds enforce it? Have the Justice Dept arrest the governor and other state officials, withhold highway funds?

Ann, any thoughts on this?

Freder Frederson said...

I don't believe Colorado has the power to legalize marijuana. I don't like this twilight zone of law. I don't think it's fair.

But you didn't say it was a bad idea for Colorado to legalize pot.

I stand corrected.

By the way, the previous law that Colorado had also contradicted Federal Law (there is no such thing as medical marijuana under Federal law).

Larry Nelson said...

Hydroponic clone technology, or using super seeds, have created the strongest pot of our lifetimes in California.
In San Diego, local authorities first closed down clinics using zoning ordinances on those too close to a school, church, etc.
Later, the Feds used the asset forfeiture laws to hammer landlords into evicting.
Soon, the local rag that advertised clinics on expensive color glossy pages, only advertised phone numbers for pizza type delivery.
Maybe that trumped the feds because now the clinics are opening up again.
I am tested for my job, so I don't go there.
I do wonder why President Choom isn't calling off his Justice Department on a war that was lost even before the war on poverty was lost?
Isn't that one of the...cough, cough...reason's he was elected?

eric said...

"Maybe that trumped the feds because now the clinics are opening up again."

I think the Feds only go every so often. You don't want to close one of these places down as soon as they open. What would be the point?

First you want them to gain assets. Then you can seize those assets and make lot's of money and get some nice things.

That can take a few years though. Let them build up their business, put hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank, or more, buy a nice house and a nice car and a nice boat, then you shut them down. Now you've got a nice house to auction off, a nice boat to auction off, a nice car to auction off and some spending cash for special operations.

eric said...

"No offense, but that's one of the least convincing articles I've come across."

I'm so offended!

Although, I've got to come clean here. I didn't write that article. You claimed to not be aware of any "solid" arguments against pot legalization.

I assume circular reasoning here.

cubanbob said...

No, you are not getting that right at all. I don't believe "Colorado has the power to legalize marijuana. It has changed state law, but this is a crime under federal law. I don't like this twilight zone of law. I don't think it's fair. That has been my point over and over again, but you think something else has not only been said but had been made "abundantly clear."

The question is does the federal government really have the authority to override a state's laws if there are no constitutional issues? If the state of Colorado deems MJ a legal product what authority does the federal government have to criminalize it in Colorado? In a weird sort of way it's like the DOMA ruling.

eric said...

"The question is does the federal government really have the authority to override a state's laws if there are no constitutional issues? If the state of Colorado deems MJ a legal product what authority does the federal government have to criminalize it in Colorado? In a weird sort of way it's like the DOMA ruling."

Wouldn't that be interesting if the Supreme Court found, like in the case of DOMA, that the Federal Government had no business in such things?

What would happen to all those people in prison throughout the USofA locked up on drug related charges?

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

Marijuana is a non-entity in my life, having about as much relevance to me as conch fritters or cricket bats. Don't consume it, don't know anyone who does (unless they're quite discreet).

I travel to Colorado not-infrequently to visit a dear friend, who is likewise completely indifferent to pot, and it would never occur to me to wonder if people think I'm going to sample the merchandise.

To be brutally honest Althouse, I don't think anyone besides you cares what you do when you go to Colorado, other than general good wishes for safety and enjoyment.

sunsong said...

I imagine that the sky won't fall over this and that other states will follow suit.

dbp said...

I am not tempted, at least not this time of year: You can't smoke in most hotel rooms, or at least not in any I would want to stay in. Who wants to smoke outside, in the winter, in Colorado?

eric said...

" imagine that the sky won't fall over this and that other states will follow suit."

I suppose you imagine all kinds of nonsense.

Let's play a game. In this game, your imagination is totally wrong and the sky does fall.

Now what?

Remember rule #1. Being a Democrat means never having to say you're sorry.

surfed said...

Law question - You legally smoke pot in Denver. two weeks later you're drug tested in your home state (for whatever reason) and test positive. You lose your job or are convicted for driving under the influence, etc. Is there recourse? Or are you hoisted?

Revenant said...

Wouldn't that be interesting if the Supreme Court found, like in the case of DOMA, that the Federal Government had no business in such things?

The Supreme Court has spent almost eighty years conveniently ignoring the fact that Congress has no Constitutional authority to ban marijuana cultivation or use.

Why would they stop now? Heck, they just re-affirmed Congress' power to regulate all aspects of American life in the Obamacare ruling.

Revenant said...

You legally smoke pot in Denver. two weeks later you're drug tested in your home state (for whatever reason) and test positive. You lose your job or are convicted for driving under the influence, etc. Is there recourse? Or are you hoisted?

No, there is no recourse. Businesses are allowed to fire you for violating company policy, even if your action wasn't illegal.

Similarly, the legality of a substance has no bearing on whether you're allowed to drive under the influence of it. Alcohol is legal, DUI isn't.

Will Cate said...

Yes, tempted. I'm happy to wait until all the hoopla dies down, but... yeah, sometime this year.

Presley Bennett said...

There are lots of reasons to go to Colorado, especially if you're an outdoorsy type so I don't think I would automatically assume that someone is going there for the dope. People who want to smoke pot haven't been sitting around waiting for it to be legal somewhere in these United States so I can't imagine that it's going to attract a huge number of people who want to go there only for that reason. But it's a nice thought, that we Americans are so law-abiding that we haven't smoked pot because it was illegal. And now that it's not, we'll give it a try.

And the last time someone tried to pass me a doobie was at a Dead concert in 1978.

Insufficiently Sensitive said...

...hoping that the day will arrive when you can walk into a nice little shop, buy some marijuana, and consume it without the need for any of the old rebellious spirit that enlivened us...

What would be the point of that? Shall we be deprived of all those good old rituals?