September 14, 2013

Aging.

A 5-minute visualization, brilliantly achieved:

Danielle from Anthony Cerniello on Vimeo.

6 comments:

Inga said...

Amazing. It made me realize that it seems as if my early life lasted only five minutes. It happened so fast. How I regret wanting to be older when I was young. Youth is wasted on young, who said that?

Now I'm amazed at the speed my grandchildren have grown and it gives me momentary anxiety that they are wishing to be older too, "too soon, slow down" I tell them. They look at me with uncomprehending eyes.

Now at 61, my days speed by at lightning speed, while they dragged by in my youth.... or so I thought.

Ann Althouse said...

It made me see exactly what's unfortunate about the face when it approaches or reaches old age. It's not age itself, which could be noble and beautiful. Its the sagging around the mouth that resembles frowning.

You can counter that simply by smiling.

Young people are able to look beautiful with a somber or serious facial expression. Old people can look interesting or acceptably not ugly with a straight face, but it's a good idea to smile, and it's not just so you can look reasonably good or in some effort to reclaim youthful beauty. We need to do it to avoid having the appearance of expressing something — sadness or disapproval — that we do not feel.

Dale Light said...

I believe it's a composite of several related individuals who have similar facial structures. Still, it's an interesting application of morphing technology.

Inga said...

True Ann. I saw that the sagging skin around the mouth drags down to face so much, the wrinkles around the eyes weren't so bad. And yes smiling uses those muscles that lift that sagging . So good excuse not to be a sad sack and keep smiling. It may actually strengthen those muscles too.

The Godfather said...

One advantage that men have as they age is that the only time a man really LOOKS at his face is once a day when he shaves. But he really doesn't see his face all that well. A gift of aging is poorer eyesight. The face in the mirror is not all that clear; the lines and wrinkles disappear in the haze. And memory fades quickly, too. By 10 am, if I think about my face at all, I think of it as it looked 25-30 years ago.

David said...

"Old people can look interesting or acceptably not ugly with a straight face, but it's a good idea to smile, and it's not just so you can look reasonably good or in some effort to reclaim youthful beauty. We need to do it to avoid having the appearance of expressing something — sadness or disapproval — that we do not feel."

Take care of your teeth, folks.