April 2, 2012

The wind map.

A science-meets-art project.

(Via BoingBoing.)

22 comments:

MadisonMan said...

The data for that comes from the NDFD (National Digital Forecasting Database). In theory, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) are supposed to coordinate with their neighbors so that winds don't change as you go from counties in one WFO's watch to another's...but that doesn't always happen. On Saturday, for example, you could really see the border between the Des Moines and Omaha WFOs.

Hagar said...

The massive wind farms are going to wind up with another Federally subsidized progarm to remove them and restore the sites.

syd B. said...

I did an overlap and was astounded to discover that this map outlines perfectly, Obama's foreign Policies.

Incredible!

Kit said...

"Very slick," says the geographer/cartographer.

rhhardin said...

It has too heavy a cpu load for my laptop that I pressed into desktop service in 2005.

Probably badly coded.

wyo sis said...

So---Wyoming is relatively wind free. And we always say Rock Springs is the windiest place in America. So much for Wyoming wind pride.

Original Mike said...

This is a "Where not to buy property" map.

rehajm said...

Cool. Smooth out the rendering, add color coding and the kiddies will have a wonderful visual accompaniment to their psychedelics.

Don't Tread 2012 said...

Very cool.

I've bookmarked this page under my 'Weather' sites. Its a keeper. Thanks.

Indigo Red said...

Really cool. What's causing the wind source in the Idaho, Oregon, California, Nevada borders area? It seems to emanate from nowhere.

edutcher said...

It seems that all that activity is coalescing around Madison.

Could it be Althouse is the Center of the Universe?

Actually, very interesting and it does truly turn science into art.

George Grady said...

Indigo Red,

There's high pressure in that area. If you look at a current national weather map and compare, you can see that, as well as a lot of other correspondences. As to where the air is coming from there, it's coming from higher altitudes. A high pressure area on the ground essentially corresponds to downwelling of the atmosphere locally.

Christy said...

Cool map. You can see mountains.

Sofa King said...

Finally, data that proves that the reason Wisconsin is windy is because Minnesota sucks and Illinois blows.

caplight45 said...

Made me lose my appetite for angel hair pasta somehow.

Paul Zrimsek said...

The vortex appears to be vacationing in New Mexico without you.

Indigo Red said...

George Grady, thanks, that was useful. A cursory viewing of the map makes it look like the exit end of a black hole - if such a thing existed outside science fiction.

Rusty said...

Indigo Red said...
Really cool. What's causing the wind source in the Idaho, Oregon, California, Nevada borders area? It seems to emanate from nowhere.



Uh. Mountains?

Nora said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nora said...

There is disclaimer on the 'art project' page that says:"We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software."

So shitty science is now "art"? Good to know.

Joan said...

This is awesome. By happy coincidence, I am studying forces of erosion with my 7th graders, and Thursday we're talking about wind. This will fit in perfectly. Thank you!

Also: even if wind wasn't on my current curriculum, I would appreciate this effort. It's so full of information and beauty.

sydney said...

So that's why Oklahoma has so many tornadoes.

Strange, here in Ohio I was always taught our weather comes from the west, but the wind seems to be blowing over us from the east on that map.