January 24, 2012

The Supreme Court "signaled sympathy with the 'mosaic' theory of privacy..."

"The mosiac theory holds that aggregating lots of pieces of information about an individual that in themselves may be harmless may nonetheless, taken as a whole, constitute a search — even if all the data is public."

That reminds me of one of the most useful books I've ever read: "Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed."

18 comments:

Browndog said...

How Marxism always fails...

How AllthoughHouse,, tries to sell you a book on Marxism, selling out capitalism, for the common good of Marxism..to make a buck..
Fails.

(come hither, defenders of the Realm)

Pogo said...

A great book.

Browndog, it's not in favor of Marxism at all. It explicitly denounced collective aims.

Pogo said...

A great book.

Browndog, it's not in favor of Marxism at all. It explicitly denounced collective aims.

edutcher said...

I thought mosaic meant the Ten Commandments.

What could I be thinking?

But there is a point to it. Maybe the Latina is wiser than we...

Nah!

wild chicken said...

In all fairness, I recall the 60's hippies as being pretty humble and thinking small-scale, experimenting on themselves rather than others. But they were co-opted by the old-school radicals like Ayers and Hayden who dreamt much bigger.

And now it's the dream of single-payer that's turned them all into little tinpot Stalins.

Rusty said...

That reminds me of one of the most useful books I've ever read: "Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed."




The history of progressive-ism in a nutshell.

Browndog said...

@Pogo-

I see it differently-

But, I appreciate your response.

Donald Douglas said...

"...one of the most useful books I've ever read."

Well, how do you quantify that? Isn't enjoyment also useful in terms of utility. Was this book better than, say, a cookbook or a hiking manual? Or was it more like a novel?

Pogo said...

The author was diffident.

His evidence mocked the results of state collectivist action, but he held back from concluding state action was always wrong.

This pissed me off at first, but I saw later that any such strong statements would have driven away anyone who was on the fence, and those few on the left still awake to facts.

Tea Party at Perrysburg said...

It seems like the last few rulings have reinforced the rights of the individual.

Bob Ellison said...

I'm watching the SOTU right now. The POTUS seems half-drunk. Does anyone else notice that?

Browndog said...

Bob Ellison said...

I'm watching the SOTU right now. The POTUS seems half-drunk. Does anyone else notice that?


I think we all noticed....as he sobered up slighlty as the speeeach whent onn.

Ug-eeh.

Jees-

traditionalguy said...

It's about time the Court started to follow Moses' Law more often.

fleetusa said...

A wonderful friend (MFN) suggested I read Atlas Shrugged in the late 60's. I've never forgotten. The same message the state can't solve our own problems.

Kirk Parker said...

"The POTUS seems half-drunk. "

Which half?

virgil xenophon said...

Ann, you should also read Thomas Sowell's 1970s work "Knowledge and Decisions" in which he makes many of the same points--especially using the founding and settlement of the State of Georgia guided by a top-down
ham-fisted administration back in England totally devoid of knowledge of local conditions in the colony.

EDH said...

Coincidently, George Harrision is alleged to have died in the home of the security consultant who developed the threat assessment system named MOSAIC.

wv - "seduclas" = I saw Mommy being seduced by seduclas, underneath the mistletoe last night

Jose_K said...

Mosaic was also the first browser. Still some browsers identify themselvesas mosaic in the web.
The theory is well esatblished in Europe .Karlruse ´s Court developed it