May 10, 2011

That serviceberry we planted in the fall...

... of '09... which "popped into bloom" on April 16, 2010... is only just now blooming this year.

P1080770

18 comments:

traditionalguy said...

The trees germinate their leaves and flowers when the soil temp get warmer. That warming is coming later everywhere as global cooling advances.

rhhardin said...

A wise plant doesn't bloom before the last freeze date.

nonapod said...

We've definitely had a late spring here in upstate New York. Usually by now (second week of May) the leaves on the sugar maples are just about full size, but so far this year they seem to be only about half way grown. We didn't even have buds on the trees until about 3 weeks ago.

Bushman of the Kohlrabi said...

I always cringe when I hear the name "serviceberry". Couldn't they have come up with a less utilitarian name for something so beautiful?

Penny said...

A late bloomer!

edutcher said...

Clearly, it's yet another sign of the complete slowdown visited upon the land by the Obamajahadeen.

MadisonMan said...

First year it sleeps, then it creeps, then it leaps.

My cherry tree is blossoming now. Yay! And the wisteria in the back -- which has never blossomed -- might have some buds on it. If it doesn't bloom this year -- after 9 years -- it's getting chopped.

Christy said...

Does the old conventional wisdom about new plants - the first year they sleep, then they creep, and by the 3rd they leap - apply to trees?

Fred4Pres said...

Service berries are a good wildlife habitat tree.

Rod said...

What the HECK is a serviceberry?

Meade said...

If it doesn't bloom this year -- after 9 years -- it's getting chopped.

MadisonMan, do it.

Nothing makes a Wisteria bloom like being chopped. I'm serious - it's a plant that loves to be stressed. Don't feed it, don't coddle it. Instead, with a spade, chop at its roots. And after bloom time (June), with loppers, chop at its shoots.

And remember: don't let it climb on any (non-concrete/steel) structure that you don't want pulled down because, by golly, it'll do it.

Meade said...

Couldn't they have come up with a less utilitarian name for something so beautiful?

Bushman, "Serviceberry" is probably a corruption of the European genus Sorbus.

Amelanchier is also known as "Juneberry" and some other common names.

I noticed, when we were in the Colorado high country, bear scat was made up of about 90% undigested Juneberries in August.

cokaygne said...

Here in New England we call it shad bush because it blooms when the shad, a fish from the ocean like salmon, swim up streams to spawn. The shad bush is Amelanchier. Sorbus is mountain ash.

peter hoh said...

Bushman, have you tried eating the fruit of the serviceberry?

It's serviceable.

As for spring -- last year's was remarkably early.

This year, spring got put on hold by a chilly April.

Bushman of the Kohlrabi said...

Peter, I know they are edible but I've never tried them. I do know that some birds are big fans.

After reading Meade's comment I thought scatberry may work. That would be a name somewhat less mundane. However, it probably won't fly with serviceberry aficionados.

As for spring, It's been cancelled here on the east coast of Lake Michigan. We'll just have to try again next year.

Bushman of the Kohlrabi said...

I mean the west coast of Lake Michigan. Duh.

peter hoh said...

In the Twin Cities, we went from cool to hot and humid. Yuck. At least it was nice Monday afternoon.

Shy Wolf said...

LOL, Bushman- there is another name for 'Serviceberry'- it's June berry. And, MMMMM, do I love picking them frommy bushes- the trick is to beat the birds.
They're wonderful fresh from the bush, but best in real cream. :P my mouth is watering!
Try freezing them- just rinse the bugs off and freeze, then use later with cream and a drop of sugar. Winter delight!
Shy III