January 18, 2011

The Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

"The L&E Clinic provides legal education on the role of lawyers in entrepreneurship, researches legal issues facing start-up businesses, and provides service to fledgling businesses."

(I'm excited about the location: the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, which is a very cool new building on campus that includes a beautiful "Town Center.")

7 comments:

t-man said...

Will there be a lecture on how to start a successful blog?

traditionalguy said...

That is a great idea. The students can get an interns experience helping out start up businesses using consultants skills along with a familiarity with legal structures of businesses. Kind of like a Trade School and a job fair combined.

edutcher said...

Is there an entrepreneurship program at the UWM business school (if there is a UWM business school)? I took an entrepreneurship class about 2 1/2 years ago and we read a good bit about programs for businesspeople to help them start their own companies.

If so, this would be a perfect complement to it.

Ann Althouse said...

"Will there be a lecture on how to start a successful blog?"

Hey, they should teach me how to monetize this thing! It's not easy.

Ann Althouse said...

"Is there an entrepreneurship program at the UWM business school (if there is a UWM business school)?"

We call it "UW." UWM would mean UW-Milwaukee around these parts.

And yes, there's a big joint program in entrepreneurship that combines the business school and the law school.

Richard Dolan said...

The name of the clinic is a bit of a misnomer. It's really about having students provide legal services at a fairly basic level to folks wanting to start a business but who lack the financial means to obtain legal services otherwise. Perfectly good thing to do, but the "entrepreneurship" is all at the client level -- not much "law and ..." there.

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