February 23, 2010

How to create and play with a bubble ring under water.

What the dolphins have to teach us:



For the record: I loathe sentimentality about dolphins. I just think this is really cool. Skip the first minute of introductory stuff if you're impatient.

31 comments:

MadisonMan said...

That is very cool. I wonder what force is keeping the air from rising.

OldGrouchy Doug Wright said...

However, "Thanks for the Fish!"

Joaquin said...

I wonder if they do that in the wild or just at SeaWorld?
Maybe they do this for entertainment because they're bored to death....

Fred4Pres said...

Senitmentality about dolphins, like snowboarding, works best with lots and lots of dope.

Or so I have been told.

rhhardin said...

It might be bubbles playing with dolphins.

Joaquin said...

Bubbles? I didn't see a chimp!

BlogDog said...

Madison Man, from what I see in the viddy, the dolphins are creating a current that controls the bubble ring.
I'm impressed with the breaking down of the larger ring into a smaller ring and having it still pretty much perfectly circular.Way cool Thanks, Ann!

EDH said...

Wow, kids all over America now have something to hone their skills on while sitting in the bath tub.

Scrutineer said...

I loathe sentimentality about dolphins.

They forgive you.

rhhardin said...

Small bubbles rise very slowly. It's not really the bubble rising anyway, it's the water going down.

Water viscosity keeps it from happening very fast against the presure difference that a small bubble produces.

I don't understand the stability of the rings, but then I don't understand smoke rings either.

The Navier Stokes equations don't tell you very transparently what its stable motions are.

rhhardin said...

Wingtip vortices persist for a while and then kink and dissipate, I think.

Those are related, probably.

I bring it up because of vortices.

Lem said...

I loathe sentimentality about dolphins.

I loathe sentimentality about dogs ;)

Joe said...

I loathe sentimentality about all animals.

Especially the Dutch (sorry, was channeling Nigel Powers there.)

paul a'barge said...

What sentimentality do you not loathe?
(1) Meade
(2) your sons
(3) dogs
(4) ex husbands

Fred4Pres said...

paul a'barge said...
What sentimentality do you not loathe?
(1) Meade
(2) your sons
(3) dogs
(4) ex husbands


Don't forget men wearing shorts.

edutcher said...

Not sure what you mean by "sentimentality about dolphins", but the tendency to anthropomorphize seems to be pretty ingrained in us. The literature about a connection with them is real, but some people always forget they're animals.

paul a'barge said...

What sentimentality do you not loathe?
(1) Meade
(2) your sons
(3) dogs
(4) ex husbands


He has a point. You seem to be back on the cruel neutrality thing again.

In any case, I found our puppies this morning all bundled in a fleece wrap we put in to help keep them warm, as if they were in bed. And, yes, Madame, it was endearing.

Greg Toombs said...

It's all about how to cope with boredom.

traditionalguy said...

This is a good post for a breast blog, since these are really hot blooded mammals that happen to swim around a lot like fish.

Skyler said...

That is about the coolest thing I've ever seen!

Kensington said...

Althouse:
"I loathe sentimentality about dolphins."

They're smarter than we are!

They're better than we are!

If only they had hands. With thumbs!

And guns!

(Of course, they wouldn't ever use guns. That's our way, not their way!)

Kensington said...

Lem:
"I loathe sentimentality about dogs ;)"

Bastard.

sunsong said...

Really neat! There's a lot we can learn from dolphins. I hope more and more of us will...

Joe said...

There's a lot we can learn from dolphins.

Like how to kill our young?

Or simply attacking passing animals and killing them?

Did I mention the torturing to death thing dolphins really like to do?

Dolphins are mean, stupid animals. Their brains consist mostly of stuff to keep the brains warm, not to make them think.

muddimo said...

We cannot learn a lot FROM dolphins, but we can learn a lot ABOUT dolphins. "From" doesn't make much sense.


I do not loathe sentimentality about dolphins, though. If you can't be sentimental about dolphins, you have a bad attitude.

muddimo said...

"torturing to death" = every carnivore


Only man understands the affect on the other.

muddimo said...

But I do loather sentimentality about people who spend way the h*ll too much time in trendy eateries.

amba said...

That's how dolphins doodle.


vw: revise (?! Now Captcha has become a writing coach?)

TML said...

Holy crapping monkeys on a stick. Did we just discover dolphins could do this? Why isn't everyone terrified beyond the ability to articulate rational thought? I'm taking no chances and am going the "full Brockman": I, for one, welcome our new marine mammalian overlords.

Big Mike said...

The fellow said that we can learn from dolphins and they can learn from us.

Oh golly, I hope not!

Any day now we'll see them cheating on their wives and crashing their SUVs, and that's just what they can learn from Tiger Woods.

PatCA said...

"They have a lot to teach us"?

I'm so tired of this faux innocence. When a dolphin bites someone, I'm sure she will say, "Oh, she's hungry because I took away her territory"!

whyyounolookupanything said...

when they blow those bubbles, the air is actually spinning really fast allowing it to keep its shape. humans can do it but no where near this good. look up 'horizontal bubble rings' and there should be videos of humans doing it