March 15, 2009

A morning's blog...

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... and then another walk out into the teasle:

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18 comments:

Ron said...

These pics have a bit too much 'serial killer' aura to them. Ohio, it is then, eh?

Robert Jay said...

Serial killer? Do they favor hideous old couhces?

Bissage said...

Same as me, many of my fellow Althousians have doubtless wondered just what exactly goes on in the head of a teutonic roboter when he takes his morgenspaziergang.

The answer, quite simply, is right here.

WARNING: Do not click link if you are smoking dope.

(I hope that warning didn’t come too late.)

I’m freaking out, man. Freaking out, man. Electric birds, man. They’re like . . . like . . . in my head, man. And the water, man, it's . . . like . . . talking to me, man. The electric birds can hear the water talking to me, man. It's freaking me out, man.

traditionalguy said...

It's planting time on the teasle plantation. The crop of choice this year should be Corn to fuel your 1000 mile round trips with ethanol and popcorn for Mid-western Movie Favorites: The Runaway Bride, and Splendor In The Teasle Grass, and Saving Private Ryan-mother's cut. But where is the Silo picture? All working farms need a Silo. Or is this really just a CIA safehouse for undercover Law Professor Attaches working out of root cellars?

Trooper York said...

The teasles are in bloom. But tell you friend to be careful of the cock teasles. They can be poisonous this time of year. Just sayn'

Methadras said...

I'm actually fascinated with the way the terminus of green meets the beginning of the brown. Sorry it's my synaesthesia. It does that to me a lot. A simple, unobtrusive point in a picture holds so much stimulus for me that I get all kinds of sensory rewards from it. But I'm totally fixated on that green/brown terminus and I don't know why. Actually I'm just staring at it right now.

former law student said...

Looks like a cocklebur to me.

Silos are too old fashioned. They've been replaced with AO Smith Harvestores for years now.

David said...

Teasle: "Upright prickly biennial herb."

Sounds a little like Althouse.

You heard it here first. Althouse is bi (in the herbal sense.)

ricpic said...

OT - Just saw the film Wendy And Lucy. Almost too painful to watch but I recommend it. Highly.

Michael Hasenstab said...

Actually, "Upright prickly biennial Herb." is one of several nicknames for Wisconsin's senior Senator.

traditionalguy said...

AO Smith Harvestors are the Blue Silos. They are built of bolted together, 10 rows of curved steel plates, like a ship, and fiberglass coated. I worked the construction crew one summer in eastern Washington. Worst part is the sunburn under your eyebrows, since you are working 12 hour days in front of a mirror. I did learn that summer that gasolene does not ignite from a lighted cigarette, but only from the flame of a cigarette lighter. It was 2 weeks before I believed that enough to join in and wash up from the rubber cement sealer at quiting time while the others were putting out cigarettes in the common gasolene wash bucket. All farm work is hard work from 4;30 AM to 7:00 PM counting travel time. It is no wonder that Illinois-raised Ronnie Reagan was a conservative. Only people who have never done any real work are liberals.

rhhardin said...

Bull Thistle.

traditionalguy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
thirdresponder said...

Blogger Methadras said...

I'm actually fascinated with the way the terminus of green meets the beginning of the brown. Sorry it's my synaesthesia. It does that to me a lot. A simple, unobtrusive point in a picture holds so much stimulus for me that I get all kinds of sensory rewards from it. But I'm totally fixated on that green/brown terminus and I don't know why. Actually I'm just staring at it right now.


Isn't the likely explanation that the brush was cleared and grass was planted?

traditionalguy said...

Never seen teasle before, and it resembles thistle. But the stem is not a thistle stem, and teasle it is. The place does not seem to be under cultivation. The retreat angle may be its best use. By providing good beds, good food, good exercise walks, good books to read, plus taking away TV, phones, internet and wireless the farm can serve as the Stress Release medicine money cannot buy.

Jason (the commenter) said...

Never seen teasle before, and it resembles thistle.

It's a European native and I don't like its look, but it was useful at one time so I can't bring myself to hate it. I think they used it to process wool or somesuch.

The place does not seem to be under cultivation.

True, but seeing an open field next to woods one has to wonder what keeps the woods from spreading. Perhaps it's being used for hay or grazing. That cedar tree says the area hasn't seen a till for a few years.

The area to the left seems mowed, so perhaps we are seeing the remains of a once luxurious bit of lawn. Such things seem to shrink with the age of the owner, especially when the owner's children move away.

David said...

Michael H:

"Actually, "Upright prickly biennial Herb." is one of several nicknames for Wisconsin's senior Senator."

Good one!

former law student said...

True, but seeing an open field next to woods one has to wonder what keeps the woods from spreading.

In the prairie, trees could grow only along watercourses.

Perhaps it's being used for hay or grazing. That cedar tree says the area hasn't seen a till for a few years.

I'd guess it was CRP land.

The area to the left seems mowed, so perhaps we are seeing the remains of a once luxurious bit of lawn. Such things seem to shrink with the age of the owner, especially when the owner's children move away.

Mowed but not lawn. Think pasture.