November 24, 2006

O.J. on eBay.

There's a selling frenzy on of O.J. Simpson's canceled book "If I Did It." Here's a current auction, with the bid now over $60,000. Can you honestly say that if you had received a review copy you would not be trying to sell it? The question is: Who's buying? Or are these "fictitious bids to ruin auction"?

UPDATE: eBay seems to have taken down the book auctions.

9 comments:

Dave said...

I'm a capitalist; I would sell anything at a profit.

bearbee said...

Your mother?

Ron said...

"If the book is pure shit -- you must bid on it!"

If that's not an Ebay hook line...

peter hoh said...

Purchase the book for an outrageous sum, and then declare that the act of paying that much money for said book is performance art. Sell book, packaging, ebay "receipt" to an art collector for even more than you paid for it. Very meta, and if you don't get it, well, don't ask.

Anon Y. Mous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anon Y. Mous said...

I'm having trouble with the links:

"selling frenzy" goes to the NY Daily News - seems right

"Here's a current auction" goes to the same NY Daily News article - seems like it should go to the actual ebay auction

"fictitious bids to ruin auction" goes to an invalid auction on ebay - seems like it should go someplace where fictitious bids on ebay are discussed (which, if that's the case, interested me the most)

dick said...

I read another interesting article about people trying to auction the relics of saints on Ebay. Apparently there is a group that is protesting it. Why would anyone bid on the relics of a saint without checking out all the provenance and why even after that!!

At least Ebay took the OJ book down. Now to see what else they stop.

DookOfURL said...

In the "You Can't Make This Stuff Up" category, here's the "reductio ad absurdum of identity politics" courtesy of James Taranto.

amba said...

The people bidding so much for this book are not doing so because they're curious our avid about its contents. They're doing so because it will be a rare and therefore valuable collectible, like a stamp with the King's head upside down that was quickly cancelled and is therefore scarce. If it is rare enough, it will end up being worth more than the highest bidder paid for it. The collectible book world is a little nuts.