May 11, 2006

"It was the best of times, it was the first of times..."

"...it was the age of ice, it was the age of lava, it was the epoch of large sloping foreheads, it was the epoch of dictabirds and monkey traffic signals and woolly-mammoth shower massages."

"How Fred Flintstone Got Home, Got Wild, and Got a Stone Age Life."

23 comments:

Jacques Cuze said...

That was pretty funny. Also nice to consider was how eco-friendly and clean most of Fred's technologies were.

Relying on clean energy transportation, there was no need for wars for oil.

We could all learn from Fred and Wilma.

SippicanCottage said...
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Joe said...

I see a member of the "reality" based community has weighed in - you know, someone who thinks Iraq is about oil and that the Flintstones are real.
Seriously, there seems to be a Primitives theme today...

Bissage said...
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Bissage said...

SippicanCottage: God, that's funny!

Jacques Cuze said...

Okay, let me see if I got this right?

First new species of Monkey in 83 years! Kipunji!

Don't EAT them Slippery, they are already endangered!

Like that?

Pastor_Jeff said...

"'It was the best of times; it was the blurst of times'?!?

Stupid monkeys!"

Tibore said...

I was so literal as a small kid, I wondered why Fred never just jumped back through the same window the cat... er, sabertooth did.

And I always wondered if it freaked that bird-cum-record player out to have all those vibrations coming through his head. But I did want a miniature wooly mammoth vacuum cleaner.

SippicanCottage said...
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Jacques Cuze said...

Look up "implacable" in the dictionary. No, not the Phone Book. The dictionary. Yeah, that's me.

Really? Good to hear that. Your postings in the past several days had me looking you up under "bipolar."

Capuchin!

Slippery, this is fun! Good idea!

SippicanCottage said...
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Jacques Cuze said...

The Searchers is on my list. You realize that Ethan wasn't exactly the good guy, right?

Chimps!

Ann Althouse said...

number 6: It's a new genus. That's what makes it interesting...

SippicanCottage said...
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Jacques Cuze said...

Yep, you're right.

It's got a really great name too.

Ann Althouse said...

Yes, I did a post on it. Based on seeing it in the NYT, not reading this thread, which I hope is keeping you out of trouble.

Jacques Cuze said...

Pretty much. I am worried about Slippery Cheese though. He's repeating more than usual, and I hope he gets back on his SSRIs soon.

SippicanCottage said...
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Bruce Hayden said...

My problem reading it is I just finished a couple of books that pointed out a couple of inconvenient facts as they relate to Fred.

First, there was no overlap between dinosours and humans, because it was their extinction that allowed mammals to expand into their niches. If a meteor (most likely) had not hit the earth, then we would most likely still have the dinosaurs, and mammals would still be a small, minor, species.

Secondly, the sloped headed humanoids were the Neanderthals, who never quite acquired the ability to make more than crude tools - their toolmaking was frozen for hundreds of thousands of years, as compared to our ancestors, where there is a nice progression (ok, it looks like at the very very end, they managed to pick up some human tool making from us).

And, I suppose that there was some overlap between saber tooth tigers and humans, but notably the overlap in North America was less than a hundred years. Yes, the most likely cause of their extinction here was at the hands of those environmentaly friendly Native Americans after the ice over Calgary melted, and they were finally able to push down into the Continental U.S. (They had apparently been in Alaska for a thousand or so years before that). Within a thousand years, they had managed to push from their down to the tip of S. America, apparently extinguishing a substantial number of the large mammal species they encountered (including, interestingly, horses).

Sorry about the dose of reality - blame it on my reading habits.

SippicanCottage said...
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Zeldazot said...

"...the sloped headed humanoids were the Neanderthals..."

Neanderthals are a member of Homo sapiens; the brain case is not sloped, and the average capacity is larger than the average for modern humans.
Their material culture was complex and not "frozen" in time.

There is a possibility that you have some of their genetic material, especially if your ancestors came from Europe or the Near East.

Horses evolved in the New World, spread into the OW, and then became extinct in the NW but not the OW during the mass (that is, world wide) extinctions of large game that occurred at the end of the last Ice Age. It is generally agreed that this process was multi-causal and the role of humans is not clear. There is some interesting evidence for horses that as the planet warmed up, the grasses shifted in the NW and the poor horsies had nothing to eat.

I liked Wilma's clothes.

zz

Zeldazot said...

Oh for pete's sake, I didn't mean to post that. Let me clarify:

a. You might share alleles with Neanderthal.
b. The change in type of grass may have led to a decline in horse population, which could have been a factor in their extinction. Humans could have been too.
c. I think it's funny that Marge Simpson and Wilma Flintstone dress the same, even to the necklace of big rocks. I think it's even funnier that the theme music is the same, although upside down and backwards.
d. And I think it's funny that the Flintstones had the wheel, as well as dinosaurs, sabre tooth cats, and appliances.

I hope this is a far far better thing to do than I have ever done...

zz

Alan Kellogg said...

The Flintstones was a poke at late 50s, early 60s suburban life. It was of a piece with Bewitched, The Addams family, and The Munsters. Never meant to be an accurate depiction of prehistory life, nor was it ever presented as an accurate depiction of prehistoric life. Fred Flintstone was a bluecollar Rob Petrie, and that's all he will ever be.