March 6, 2006

Where's my NYT?

We've been getting some serious snow these last two days, and the worst part about it is that I can't find my New York Times. The snow shoveling guys might have covered it up, or maybe it just didn't come. Trying to get the day started without the foundation of the paper Times is hard for me. Am I just supposed to read the website? Why does that feel so awkward to me, when I do so much other reading on line? It's a mental quirk of mine. I've had the Times delivered for the entire time I've lived in Wisconsin, over 20 years. Why the NYT? It's not just that I was living in New York before I came here, it's that the NYT delivered out here, and the local papers are completely insubstantial. I've become quite attached to it, in its traditional form.

13 comments:

Madison Guy said...

Not just you, mine's missing too, after a thorough search under the snowdrifts. I was out on the road late last night -- think the truck from Chicago chickened out in the fog. Called the automated response line printed on the bag and asked for another copy. Wonder when it will come? Feel naked without it. For awhile, we tried to save trees by only having Sunday delivered and reading online during the week. Know what you mean — it didn't work. Felt disembodied all day.

TetonSig said...

Trying to get the day started without the foundation of the paper [WSJ] is hard for me. Am I just supposed to read the website? Why does that feel so awkward to me, when I do so much other reading on line? It's a mental quirk of mine. ....the local papers are completely insubstantial. I've become quite attached to it, in its traditional form.

Swap WSJ for Times as I've done and those are my exact words/feelings.

Wow am I glad I'm not the only one.

I am happily neck deep in high technology throughout my life and yet I still feel "off" if I can't drink a beverage and get my "hands on" news in the morning.

I recently had the opportunity to relocate from Michigan to Jackson Hole, Wyoming. For all the great plusses of the move, not being able to consistently get the Journal delivered, (and I mean at all some days, let alone in the morning before I start my day), is a real irritant for me.

Yeah, I know, it's really not a big deal considering, but still.

I'm also with you on the inconsequentiality of the local papers. The News and Guide and Planet are only published weekly here. The Star-Tribune from Casper is tolerable for the larger state and local stuff. (Although really, maybe it's just that much happens out here anyway, right? It is Wyoming after all.)

I do miss my Detroit News. I picked up a copy on my way out of town this morning and ironically now that I've moved they have fixed my biggest annoyance with them; no morning delivery.

word verification: qxoue

Hopefully not an omen of how trollish/boring my post is.

quietnorth said...

Because I do so much work online, reading a paper online reminds me of working. Reading a "paper" paper makes me think of "break". Its like coffee, or a conversation with a friend, or pondering time...

Dave said...

Re the tradition of the New York Times being delivered--I agree even if my politics have diverged from its over the years.

As for the Journal, oddly, given that I live in NYC, I have never had it delivered, but I read it daily on the web.

TWM said...

"Maybe the dingo ate your Times?" - Elaine

Ann Althouse said...

The paper appeared around 9:30. Really bad, but it is rather snowy.

Icepick said...

Ah, now we know the REAL reason for your move: You don't want to have to dig through any more freakin' snowbanks to find your morning newspaper!

bringmeback said...

Yeah... the driver's should kill themselves to bring you your New York Times.. The mail doesn't come out here if the snow is too bad: this invludes mail-away prescriptions, bills, checks, and actually important things. Few people whine about this because the people delivering the mail (and your precious NYT) are people too, despite the fact that they aren't up to par with your uppity academic standards, and shouldn't be forced to risk their lives to bring you your morning comfort when you can easily read it online.

Disgusting.

TWM said...

Dang, bringmeback, she appeared to be posting about missing the Times, not about how bad paperboys (and girls) are.

Save "disgusting" for things that apply.

BTW, both my mail carrier and my paper carrier suck. The mail is routinely late and mis-delivered and the paper never gets in the paperbox.

How's that for disgusting?

Ann Althouse said...

The "paperboy" is an adult man who drives around in his car -- in Madison, where we know how to drive in the snow.

altoids1306 said...

Yeah... the driver's should kill themselves to bring you your New York Times.. The mail doesn't come out here if the snow is too bad: this invludes mail-away prescriptions, bills, checks, and actually important things. Few people whine about this because the people delivering the mail (and your precious NYT) are people too, despite the fact that they aren't up to par with your uppity academic standards, and shouldn't be forced to risk their lives to bring you your morning comfort when you can easily read it online.

Disgusting.


Yes, I agree. The far better solution is to just read it online, in which case there would be no need to deliver papers, and we could fire the driver.

OddD said...

What's with all the hate-mail lately?

I can see not liking this blog for a lot of reasons. I'm not going to enumerate these reasons because, hey, it's not my site, I don't pay Ann anything, and if I really don't like it, I'll go somewhere else.

Is this just because Althouse has been labelled "conservative"?

Frank Borger said...

For many years in Chicago, the first thing in the morning I'd open the front door and my dog Barney would "retrieve" the Chicago Tribune. He would then get a doggy bone as a reward. (Sundays were fun to watch as he would drag the paper up the steps.)

One day, no paper! He was disconsolate. He sat by the door, waiting for the thump of the paper. I even tried refolding yesterday's paper and tossing it out, but he could smell the difference. He was also honest. He wouldn't take his bone until he did his work.

In retrospect, he demonstrated a classic Pavlovian response.

How long did you say you were trained?