June 29, 2016

"This is the new pen...."

P1150500

I'd said the other day, "I ordered the pen. I ordered the ink." The ink arrived yesterday and the pen today. I'm just so pleased with it. I'm getting back to my artistic proclivities. #Altexit.

44 comments:

Rob said...

This is my pen. There are many like it, but this one is mine. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. Without me my pen is useless. Without my pen, I am useless.

My pen is human, even as I am human, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strengths, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will keep my pen clean and ready, even as I am clean and ready. We will become part of each other.

Before God I swear this creed. My pen and I are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life.

So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy.

choirmom said...

Yay! So happy for you!

Limited blogger said...

Terrific, Ann!

Unknown said...

With all the talk of fountain pens and the beautiful lines they create, I'm going to take the plunge too. I've been watching numerous videos made by fountain pen collectors and users. One of them listed the Pelikan M600 as his number one out of over roughly 20 pens. Reading up on the best paper to use with fountain pens. Would be interested in other's recommendations. Noodler's ink or Pelikan ink the best choices? I've used calligraphy pens years ago and did some pen and ink drawings also. I've been using Sakura micron pens for several years, but want to experience the line variation with the fountain pen again.

EDH said...

Very Yellow Submarine?

Bill, Republic of Texas said...

#Altexit?!? Blogging? Teaching?

I'd guess teaching. There seems to be a note of nostalgia and weening lately.

David Begley said...

Unknown

Order through the Amazon Althouse portal. Or else!

Bill said...

You've got a Peter Max/Heinz Edelmann/Milton Glaser vibe there.

Unknown said...

The Pilot/ Namiki Falcon Soft, through Amazon is about $149, for the medium nib. A better choice for a semi beginner?

CWJ said...

Definitely a different page from the ones you showed us using the old pelikan. Different time different Althouse illustrated by a near identical pen. I'm envious. I wish I had a similar one to one comparison to see how I've changed.

David said...

Back on acid?

madAsHell said...

...and did you order through the Althouse Amazon portal??

madAsHell said...

Hmmm.....I see Mr. Begley beat me to the promotion of the Amazon Althouse portal.

Original Mike said...

"Back on acid?"

That's what I was thinking.

Bob said...

In point of fact you haven't shown the new pen, but the writing that the pen produces. You should have included the pen in the photo.

bwebster said...

Glad to see this. I've been reading your blog long enough to remember when your various sketches and doodles make regular appearances. Looking forward to seeing the next generation.

Shane said...

"I think I have seen a Blue Meanie!"
"What should we do?"
"Let's sing!"
"One!"
"Two!"
"Three!"
"Four!"
"Can I have a little more?"

Ann Althouse said...

"In point of fact you haven't shown the new pen, but the writing that the pen produces. You should have included the pen in the photo."

You are seeing the pen in the sense that matters -- what can be done with it.

But if you want to see it, click on the link at the end (on "the pen") and you can see it (and if you like, buy it).

Draw along with me and in the comments, you can link to your drawings.

Birdwatcher said...

Nice! Glad to see it. Glad to hear about it.

john said...

Bill/Texas said it. Why not volunteer in your local primary school teaching cursive? Kids could use the discipline. Typing or mouse driving does not teach fine muscle control or hand eye coordination like writing with a pen.

Besides, it is going on 2 generations since some girl has had her pigtails dipped in ink.

Paddy O said...

"You are just another abuser of the tenure system. What has it been Ann? A good two decades since you published anything?"

Silliness. I don't have tenure, so I'm not defending the system. But tenure involves a lot of factors. Teaching is a significant one. Having the freedom as a teacher especially in an era where students have so much voice, and often use that abusively, is huge. Althouse has been one of the most public teachers of the Constitution since she started blogging.

Whereas Instapundit is a more popular blogger, he rarely teaches about law on his blog. Althouse often engages her audience with academic insight from her field. Arguably this is more important than law review articles (I don't know Althouse's CV so have no idea what she has done in that way), as law review articles are edited by law students and have relatively limited reach.

So between continuing to be active in educating professionals and involved in national conversations on issues directly about the law and a lot of issues which affect and are affected by the law, Althouse has made a significant contribution to her field in a way that would likely be impossible without tenure. Not missing a day of blogging for so long is quite a feat, after all.

Even if there's disagreement, there's always been a collegial atmosphere here for people from various backgrounds and viewpoints that have provided a conversation about the law for over a decade. Being able to bridge the academic and practical discussions is a rare feat, which is why public intellectuals are often given their own category of academic status and freedom. They can use their tenure for broad public purposes as well as specific educational tasks. Althouse is a great example of a public intellectual.

Michael said...

It takes a while for a new fountain pen to be broken in, so be patient.

Todd Galle said...

You moderns... i'm mostly responsible for turning quills into pens at our historic site. Kids really, really like writing with quill pens. It's easy really to do with a sharp knife. If Ms. A would enjoy, I'll send her one of my quill pens (used) and some gall ink.

Todd Galle said...

Oh, In reading the above, I should say that I meant cutting quill pens was simple with a sharp knife, not the kids. Some kids though...

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

Oh, please altexit from teaching, not blogging. I would miss you so.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

Which historic site,Todd G? I bought some goose feather quills and a cheap ceramic inkwell at colonial Williamsburg back in highschool--I used the quills but the inkwell wasn't glazed inside in the bottom so my ink soaked through! The quills worked pretty well but would split after a while. They can hold a surprising amount of ink, though.

I bought a big box of wooden practice/school nib holders off EBay several years ago and use those with metal nibs--thise are easy to find in Michael's or similar craft schools, including calligraphy style nibs.

Unknown said...

I've done quite a bit of homework and decided to get a cheap starter flex nib pen. The Noodlers Ahab flex nib pen gets good reviews and if I don't enjoy writing and drawing with fountain pens I won't have broken the bank. If I fall in love with it, I can always upgrade. I'm getting the Noodlers ink and an inexpensive Bristol notebook to begin with. I'm also going to get the Sakura pigment brush pen set in colors to enhance the page's scribblings. Thanks for inspiring me Althouse!

Unknown said...

That should be Sakura pigma, not pigment.

Todd Galle said...

Well, H-D,
I may as well come clean... I've been reticent to comment too much (have lurked for years), as I am a civil servant at a state historic site, but since I'm nearing the retirement prize...and our family surname is fairly unique outside of French glass companies and most could find out easily enough:

Currently I'm Curator at Pennsbury Manor, William Penn's reconstructed 17th C. summer estate on the Delaware River in PA. Previously, I was an Asst. Curator of Military History at the State Museum of PA in Harrisburg for some 20 years.

We have many thousands of 4th graders through each season (PA history being a requirement [yet] in that grade). The really love the pens. In fact, we have wonderful volunteers to help with the crush of kids who request doing the quill pens, just because the kids love it so much.

As for the quill splitting, you need to cut the feathering back, cut across the quill horizontally, and retip if enough is left. If not, find another quill. We have 3 domestic geese who help with supply, plus enough horribly filthy Canadian non-Migratory birds to supply the rest.

If you want to try another ink well, just find our webpage and send an email to my attention. I'll take care of it. We have wells we have used for years, no leaks and apparently indestructible even by thousands of field tripping 4th graders.

Regards

'TreHammer said...

...looks like a Blue Meanie...

Rt1 Rebel said...

When I was a boy, I bought Bic pens for $0.29 or I stole them, and I chewed on the caps until I lost them, and the ink ended up in my mouths and on my shirts, and I liked it!

Enjoy the pen Ann. ;)

Freeman Hunt said...

For someone wanting to try a bold fountain pen on the cheap, the Pelikano Jr. is nice.

gratefulgee said...

All those years ago indeed, professor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Smw33PKJA

James Pawlak said...

When did I "sit" for that drawing?

Ann Althouse said...

"When I was a boy, I bought Bic pens for $0.29 or I stole them, and I chewed on the caps until I lost them, and the ink ended up in my mouths and on my shirts, and I liked it!"

At least you survived. I think a lot of people died choking on those pen caps.

Ann Althouse said...

Not Tennessee Williams though. He died choking on the kind of cap that comes on a nasal spray bottle.

Ann Althouse said...

@Paddy

Thanks.

I read that after deleting the person you responded to.

Ann Althouse said...

#Altexit does NOT refer to ending this blog.

It's about winding up my teaching responsibilities.

Danno said...

Ann, Thanks for clarifying what #Altexit stands for.

Sydney said...

Can't afford a pen like that, but I did order the gel pens that Freeman Hunt recommended on a previous thread. I remember learning calligraphy as a teenager with a pen that had to be dipped in the ink. I've never written with a fountain pen that has the ink inside in a cartridge. Does the ink dry fast or does it tend to smear?

LCB said...

Like a pocket knife, I know better than to spend much money on pens. I'd only lose it, just as I've lost pens and knives in the past. I finally started carrying a $6 pocket knife...and so far have only managed to lose 3 or 4 of them. :-)

Tank said...

Tank is also winding up his practice. Coincidence. Does that mean Althouse is done at Wisconsin Law?

I would gladly pay $10,000 for 1/2 of Althouse's artistic talent. Really. I wish I had some ability for that. I'd gladly work at it (I've tried), but it's hopeless. Tank got nuttin.

Freeman Hunt said...

The gel pens aren't fountain pens, but I do love them. The ink dries fast. The ink out of the Pelikano Jr., which is a fountain pen, dries more slowly.

Rhythm and Balls said...

Cool pen and sketch.