June 14, 2007

Manboobs.

The website. Hey, I didn't go looking for it. I read about it in the NYT -- in an article about how common it is these days for males to get breast reduction surgery for gynecomastia:
In 2006, according to the group, nearly 14,000 boys age 13 to 19 underwent surgery to reduce the size of their breasts. That represents 70 percent of all the male patients who had such surgery last year, and an increase of 21 percent over the previous year for that age group.

In a culture that increasingly encourages young boys to be body conscious, demand for chiseled torsos and sculpted pecs is rising, so much so that the number of boys ages 13 to 19 who had breast reduction surgery last year is equal to the total number of all men who had the procedure just two years earlier, in 2004.

The foremost reason is the rise in obesity, according to several plastic surgeons who were interviewed. At the same time, there is a new willingness among pediatricians and plastic surgeons to surgically treat enlarged male breasts.

14 comments:

Hoosier Daddy said...

Back in the 1980s when steroid use was high among bodybuidlers, gynecomastia was just one of the more severe side effects that one could suffer.

Obesity aside, as the article says, a certain percentage of this condition is simply part of growing up, and only in rare cases does it become a permanent feature.

I think a 15 year old going through surgery is a tad drastic considering it most likely is the hormonal change kids go through, or is because of obesity which can be controlled with diet and exercise.

George said...

You're just jealous.

pepr said...

Wouldn't want to call the kid obese and put him on a diet or throw his butt outside to work it off...no lets do surgery.

TetonSig said...

I endured teasing and never feeling comfortable taking my shirt off until I was about 23 when I took a bonus from work and had the surgery done.

At the time I was probably 20 lbs overweight. Not obese by any means, just typical IT guy who didn't really exercise. While I'm sure I could have worked them off with a better diet and exercise program, the article is spot on when the guy mentions that having the "man boobs" are a psychological hurdle.

It's one thing to have a few extra pounds and have a bit of a gut, but with the boobs, you feel like you're starting out in an even deeper hole. Like you body is just wrong and it totally draws your focus.

Once they were gone I felt such a huge surge of confidence and a jump start to be healthier overall. Within another two years I had made all kinds of healthy eating and exercising changes.

I think the final cost was $8100, and it was worth many times that to me.

Pogo said...

Surgery?
More power to 'em.

But really, when people can afford plastic surgery for self esteem and milder aesthetic issues, how can there be a simultaneous claim for national health care because we can't afford it anymore.

Both can't be true.

Hoosier Daddy said...

But really, when people can afford plastic surgery for self esteem and milder aesthetic issues, how can there be a simultaneous claim for national health care because we can't afford it anymore.

Spot on. I was thinking the same thing.

I can pretty much guarantee you that most, if not all, health insurance would not pay for this kind of procedure (at least none that I know of and I work in the industry) since it would be deemed 'not medically necessary'.

Bissage said...

From the article: "In April, the appellate division of the State Supreme Court ruled that the insurance company must pay the family $5,000 toward the $7,500 surgery. But the majority of patients pay for the procedure themselves."

Since I've been referring to the wise words of some of my old law professors lately, let's do another: "Today's idiocy is tomorrow's law."

Hoosier Daddy said...

I'm going to have to find that case as I would be very interested to see on what grounds the court made that ruling. I'm guessing ambiguous policy language as nearly all health policies I have been exposed to are quite explicit in that cosmetic surgery for aesthetic purposes is not covered.

Breast reconstruction as the result of a masectomy or reconstructive surgery as the result of birth defects or injury are generally covered though.

Bissage said...

Here are two quickie quotes from Schulman v. Group Health Inc., 39 A.D.3d 223, 833 N.Y.S.2d 62 (N.Y.A.D., April 03, 2007):

“As Appellate Term found, the trial court's determination that plaintiff established a prima facie case with, inter alia, medical evidence provided by the son's pediatrician and plastic surgeon, describing the son's gynecomastia as a ‘deformity’ that caused him to suffer emotional distress and depression, inhibiting his ‘psychosocial development,’ was not ‘clearly erroneous’ and otherwise satisfied the governing substantial justice standard.”

“Defendant's argument that plaintiff's claim of emotional distress must fail since it is not supported by a mental health professional is particularly disingenuous. The condition suffered by plaintiff's son was characterized by plaintiff's medical providers as a ‘deformity’ and, particularly in the case of a 17-year-old male, clearly a devastating condition with ‘psychosocial’ consequences. It is absurd to deny coverage on the grounds that plaintiff's son did not provide support from a mental health professional, particularly where the external review decision itself acknowledges that the patient suffers ‘depression’ and ‘emotional distress’ from this condition.”

Sorry, Ann, if they're not quickie enough.

boston70 said...

OMG, that website is hilarious. Some of their manboobs are huge, with enormous nipples. Thanks for sharing-I can't stop looking at all them-how sad. They are really quite unattractive.

The guy doing the arabesque (sp) on the beach is terrific.

When I reached puberty my nipples got really big and I read somewhere that this can happen to young boys reaching puberty. I remember swimming in Phy Ed. Class and all the boys teasing my big nipples. Fortunately, they deflated.

Now my pecs are firm and waxed-I am actually playing with them right now. Anyone want to go into a private room?

boston70 said...

Hoosier Daddy steroid us is still popular among men. At my gym it is evident who is on the juice.

I also have a decent amount of acquaitances who generally do a "cycle a year". Especially this time of the year because of the beach. One of my friends they call Nurse Ratchet because he lines up all their rearends and gives each the shot. The cycle is generally 8-12 weeks, one shot every week.

Hoosier Daddy said...

Hoosier Daddy steroid us is still popular among men. At my gym it is evident who is on the juice.

Oh I have no doubt it's still high but back in 'the day' (late 70s and 80s) it was rampant. One the main reason was because it was so easy to get, hardly regulated from a law enforcement perspective and by today's standards, pretty cheap.
Now I think possession is a class 3 felony in some states and much more vigorously enforced that what it used to be.

Peter Palladas said...

Hey, I didn't go looking for it.

Yeah sure. Real gender equality now - women ogling men's breasts.

Man goes to buy a Rolls Royce car in the 1920s. Notices the crank handle and asks what it's for. Salesman tells him it's there in case the engine won't start from the ignition.

"So even a Rolls Royce can breakdown eh?" says the guy.

"Sir," says the salesman. "Do you note that you have two nipples on your chest as does a lady?"

"Why yes of course. So what?"

"They are there in case you should ever have a baby."

Methadras said...

Hoosier Daddy said...

One the main reason was because it was so easy to get, hardly regulated from a law enforcement perspective and by today's standards, pretty cheap.


Its still easy to get, plentiful, and fairly cheap...