July 26, 2005

"N.Y.U. has an extraordinary and unique role in American legal education."

Jeffrey Toobin quotes NYU lawprof Sylvia Law saying:
“N.Y.U. has an extraordinary and unique role in American legal education,” Law said recently in her office, which is decorated with samples from her collection of homemade quilts. “We’ve been ahead of everyone in welcoming women and blacks to law schools and to the profession.”
Everyone? Here are the University of Wisconsin Law School's milestones:
1st African-American student, Charles Noland, 1875
1st Woman graduate, Belle Case LaFollette, 1885
1st African-American graduate, William Green, 1892
So would you please take that back, Professor Law?

ADDED: Nothing against N.Y.U. School of Law. It's my alma mater. I owe those folks a lot. They let me in, despite my appallingly inadequate background.

3 comments:

AJ Lynch said...

I don't know- using the term "welcoming" with regards to who and who does not get into law school strikes me as too subjective sounding. Guess I am being too picky but words have meaning. Just yesterday, a NY Times piece slandered our military by calling them mercenaries.

But I am off track here- I glanced at Toobin's article and it's called Annals of Law. The first paragraph indicates the story centers on gay rights so I'll be a wiseguy and suggest his story be re-named Anals of Law.

Patrick said...

Okay, then, how about this? “N.Y.U. has an extraordinary and unique role in American legal education. We’ve been ahead of everyone in welcoming people with appallingly inadequate backgrounds to law schools and to the profession.”

Troy said...

Damn! I thought MY law school was the first to welcome students with appallingly inadequate backgrounds! That rips it. I am not going to donate to the library fund now.