November 18, 2016

If you're going to make up fake stories for the internet.

Make them like this.

IN THE COMMENTS: Martin L. Shoemaker says:
It's fake? I don't see where it says that.
Well, first of all, if it were fake, it wouldn't say it's fake. And the news site passing a story along might not realize it's fake. But, as I say in the comments:
I didn't say it was fake. I have no idea. But it has a distinct whiff of fakery about it. Enough that I'm not trusting it. Maybe it's true. How the hell would you know?

I'm just saying this is the kind of story I like to see, so if you're going to make fake news stor[ies], make stories that bring us together and inspire us to be kinder and more inclusive.
If these nice people in the story — the white grandma and the young black man she accidentally texted an invitation to Thanksgiving dinner — really had the experience depicted at the link, then that's just lovely. Nothing against them, of course. I liked it. I liked it so much I had to be skeptical that I'm being fed fluff, marshmallow fluff. Mmm. Dollop some of that on the sweet potatoes. I'm coming over.

21 comments:

Martin L. Shoemaker said...

It's fake? I don't see where it says that.

PB said...

Fake is fake. Journalists should be run out of the profession for fake news.

Ann Althouse said...

I didn't say it was fake. I have no idea. But it has a distinct whiff of fakery about it. Enough that I'm not trusting it. Maybe it's true. How the hell would you know?

I'm just saying this is the kind of story I like to see, so if you're going to make fake news story, make stories that bring us together and inspire us to be kinder and more inclusive.

Ann Althouse said...

"It's fake? I don't see where it says that."

Since when do fake stories have a place where they say they are fake?!

Curious George said...

"Ann Althouse said...
I'm just saying this is the kind of story I like to see, so if you're going to make fake news story, make stories that bring us together and inspire us to be kinder and more inclusive."

It's still manipulation. Not good.

""It's fake? I don't see where it says that."

Since when do fake stories have a place where they say they are fake?!"

They don't. But when cames a story is fake the link goes to a site that says it is, and why.

Paco Wové said...

Can somebody point to a real example of this "fake news" I've been hearing so, so much about this past week?

mezzrow said...

MAKE AMERICA
FAKE AGAIN

alan markus said...

Now we are finding that some of the lists of fake news sites may be subject to fakery:

Meet Leftist Prof Who Wrote Hit List of Fake News Sites

Ann Althouse said...

Remember, the news you read is all hearsay.

You do not know if it's true.

lemondog said...

Scroll down for video of fake grandma meeting fake grandson.
'That's what grandmas do,

Nice acting all around......

Quaestor said...

Sweet potato casserole with marshmallows on top. Yuck.

I don't know who invented that crap, but it was likely that Kraft Kitchen that spent the livelong day coming up with revolting food-like concoctions aimed at selling more Philadelphia cream cheese, or some such noxious product.

Reminds me of this.

Quaestor said...

Fake news is fake news. This is Facebook transforming into Pravda.

Surprise.

rehajm said...

Didn't every public high school have a girl who would imagine stories she would like to think were true so she reported them to everyone as if they were true? Who knew you could make a career of it.

mikee said...

I once accidentally, quite without intent, seduced a girl by quoting Monty Python to her in public. Her behavior, later that night, after we had spent an hour or so trading lines from The Holy Grail and Life of Brian in a crowd of non-Pythonics, was more than surprising to me.

So actions do not always correlate with effects. This is omething to keep in mind when reading strange stories that don't make sense to you, but which might have some real meaning to someone else.

Of course, once I knew the power of Monty Python, I used it more wisely, and much more carefully.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

If these nice people in the story — the white grandma and the young black man she accidentally texted an invitation to Thanksgiving dinner — really had the experience depicted at the link, then that's just lovely.

I'm betting it is a true story, but was a fake accidental invite. Kid's gonna go there, eat a bunch of turkey, doze off for a short after-turkey nap, and wake up on the auction block.

That sort of think happens all the time. It's just the way America is.

Darrell said...

There's still hope that he will kill the entire family at Thanksgiving.

Unknown said...

But but but it's on the internet, it must be true!!
Most news stories even from major media are screwed up in some manner (omission usually). The events in Portland are a "protest" not a "riot"--yeah sure. The media weren't even trying to hide their disgust about Trump and their love for Hillary. caveat emptor applies to ALL news.

The Elder said...

I disagree that "it has a distinct whiff of fakery about it."

It sounds exactly like something the Grandma I live with would say to someone she accidentally invited for Thanksgiving dinner.

The Elder said...

See what I mean?

http://insider.foxnews.com/2016/11/18/grandmas-mistaken-text-message-brings-teen-thanksgiving-dinner

Some Grandmas are like that! Sure glad I married one like that 42 years ago.

Meade said...

"exactly like something the Grandma I live with"

PolitiMeadeFact fact checker rates this assertion... TRUE!

The Elder said...

In my household, it's simply the result of being Hoosierly.