January 3, 2016

Black-and-white in color... today at Odana...

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20 comments:

chickelit said...

The golf between winter and spring is ever whitening.

Terry said...

I like Odana. The casino is a fun place. It's actually staffed by native Americans.

Ann Althouse said...

?? I guess there's a casino in Odanah, Wisconsin.

This is just a golf course... groomed for skiing in the winter. It's my favorite place because it's within my skill range (and no risk of Sonny Bono-ing into a tree).

Danno said...

My only familiarity with this park has been because I have biked on the Southwest Trail, which runs along it. Too cold for that now, at least for me. I sure hope you don't "Sonny Bono" yourself with your skis.

Terry said...

Odana golf course, not the village of Odanah?
Nevermind.
It's actually called 'Bad River Casino and Lodge.'
According to its website, it is possible to win big money there.

Curious George said...

That's the par four 8th hole on the left and the par five 6th on the right. I think.

MadisonMan said...

I found today really bleak. Yesterday was much nicer.

Meade said...

Ah but tomorrow. Tomorrow the sky should be between 3/8 and 5/8 uncovered by clouds. Partly splendid.

Laslo Spatula said...

Absolutely great photos, but they scare me on some level I can't quite identify.

Desolate. No hope on the edges. No hope on the horizon.

Here I lay down, tired, to die.

How did people manage to withstand this land a hundred years ago?

I am Laslo.

harrogate said...

The Oregon situation is being muted by the media. Wonder why that is ?

Saint Croix said...

Nice photos, Althouse!

I'm shooting my first film, Christians, in black and white. (If we raise the money!) Some movies just have to be in black and white. Schindler's List, for instance. Black and white gives your film a serious quality.

Why?

I think because our world is filled with color.

Imagine if you wake up tomorrow, and the world is black and white. You freak out, right? You're worried that you are going blind. So you run to your neighbor, the doctor. Only he's freaking out too. Because the world is black and white. We've lost all color in the world!

People would be running around in the streets. We would panic. Is God mad at us? Where did the color go? We would freak out.

That's why black and white works, I think. Black and white seems "arty" because it's unlike the real world. It gives your cinema a sense of unreality, of difference, of strangeness.

Jeff Teal said...

Robert Redford commenting on Faye Dunaway's bleak photographs in "Three Days Of The Condor"-"Looks like November".Winter is coming late .

MadisonMan said...

Imagine if you wake up tomorrow, and the world is black and white. You freak out, right?

Not exactly. I'd wonder if there is something wrong with the rods/cones in my eyes. They're what detect color, after all. I'd also wonder if something in the atmosphere was selectively absorbing wavelengths associated with particular color(s), and what that gas could be (and where it came from).

Original Mike said...

"Not exactly. I'd wonder if there is something wrong with the rods/cones in my eyes. They're what detect color, after all. I'd also wonder if something in the atmosphere was selectively absorbing wavelengths associated with particular color(s), and what that gas could be (and where it came from)."

I can't imagine a plausible external physical cause. Ergo, I'd freak out.

Curious George said...

ANd it's Odana Hills

Original Mike said...

Remember, MM, white is the combination of all colors.

Original Mike said...

Upon reflection, I realize Saint Croix's what-if is something I've experienced many times after stargazing in the pre-dawn hours. At night, light levels are so low only the rods are stimulated. Since only cones provide color vision, you see in black and white. As light begins to return to the world, you begin to see more and more detail but it's still only in black and white. Then light levels reach the threshold of cone stimulation and, like a switch being thrown, your vision switches to color. It's really quite startling and wonderful if you watch for it. Try it sometime!

MadisonMan said...

Remember, MM, white is the combination of all colors.

Yes. If you were to remove all, say, green light (550 microns) by absorption of a gas, and your cones that are sensitive to red light were going haywire, you're left with monochromatic vision -- sort of.

I too also like the colorization that occurs as night goes to day. I observed it a couple times while boy scout camping and it made a real impression.

Original Mike said...

"I too also like the colorization that occurs as night goes to day. I observed it a couple times while boy scout camping and it made a real impression."

Best time for dramatic effect is during peak fall color.

Saint Croix said...

At night, light levels are so low only the rods are stimulated. Since only cones provide color vision, you see in black and white.

I was walking my dog on the beach in the middle of the night once. Out on the sand, the moon was really, really big in the sky. And I could see so well! The sand was pure white. I could see my dog perfectly, even though it was 3:00 a.m. or something. I could see everything below my knees, with the moonlight bouncing off the white sand. Up high, everything was black. So that's a great example of a black and white world. White moon, white sand, white moon bouncing off the white sand, and black everywhere else.

It looked unlike anything I have ever seen in my life. Very, very cool.