April 25, 2014

"It was neither psychic nor much of a massage... He was more like a $250-an-hour life coach who happened to have good hands..."

"... which he ran lightly over my arms, legs, lower back and abdomen. He said he did this to get a better read of my energy. And when he was done, he reported, 'There’s nothing wrong with you, Jeremy.' He reassured me I was just sensitive."

ADDED: In this week's episode of Skeptoid — #411 — Brian Dunning returns to what was the very first topic of the long running podcast: the human body's energy fields.

9 comments:

Peter said...

Those who believe in nothing will believe in anything?

virgil xenophon said...

My first thought: Jeremy! Jeremy's back?
Oh, nevermind...

t-man said...

Enchantment Resort is spectacularly beautiful, as is the spa described in the article. I went with my wife about 10 years ago. It was somewhat spoiled by all of the new-age crap, but a good trip nonetheless.

As an East Coaster, I have to say that spending time in Northern Arizona (we took a trip to Grand Canyon as well), made me better appreciate the Road Runner cartoons.

traditionalguy said...

Christianity acknowledges the existence of spiritual persons without bodies, with the caveat that any spirits that you can control are not the Holy Spirit because you cannot control God.

Receiving guidance from a psychics is not new. Shamans are the oldest practitioners of magic on earth.

john said...

I could live here for 24 years and not even be aware these places were right next door.

Or longer.

Joe said...

What a rip off; for half the price I can do a true psychic spiritual massage and you don't even have to leave your house!

David said...

Another searing article in the NYT crusade against income inequality.

mamawolf said...

It seems that snake oil is still being sold in this country. P. T Barnum would be proud.

grackle said...

More money than sense and this crap is what is resorted to. Better off buying a boat for the driveway. Or better yet, go to Vegas.