December 12, 2012

"We are monks, we don't want to be too commercial."

"We needed some money to help us buy the new abbey and that's it."

So you can have your Westvleteren 12. Here's where you can buy it, for $85.00 a 6-pack. No Wisconsin retailers, unfortunately.

And you can't buy it on Amazon, though I see Amazon offers a book: "Brew Like a Monk: Trappist, Abbey, and Strong Belgian Ales and How to Brew Them."

11 comments:

Rory Moore said...

It is an excellent beer. But for those that can't get their hands on it I would recommend the Rochefort 10 or the Saint Bernadus 12 ABT as substitutes.

EDH said...

"We are monks, we don't want to be too commercial."

Here we come, walkin'
Down the street.
We get the funniest looks from
Everyone we meet.

Hey, hey, we're the Monkees

And people say we monkey around.
But we're too busy singing
To put anybody down.

We're just tryin' to be friendly,
Come and watch us sing and play,
We're the young generation,
And we've got something to say.

Hey, hey, we're the Monkees,
You never know where we'll be found.
so you'd better get ready,
We may be comin' to your town.

Mitchell the Bat said...

Michael Jackson went on record as saying that a claim of having a precious water source is crap, necessitated by a worldwide market for the other ingredients.

No brewery cares to boast about its recipe, which is what makes all discernable difference, excepting naturally ocurring air-borne yeasts, said products comprising a tiny fraction of the market.

I met Michael Jackson, once, at an early afternoon book signing.

He was drunk.

traditionalguy said...

Tourists in Devonshire often stop at a restored Abby run by monks that had once been a Monastery until Henry VIII expropriated it.

Their claim to fame has been selling Devon Cream Tea at a high cost. That is hot tea served with a scoop of whipped cream on fruit scones.

They have also started selling a wine that is high (14.8%)in alcohol and "fortified" with a large dose caffeine. They call that combination a Breakfast Tonic wine.

But now the youth in Scotland are all getting blind drunk on it as the newest fad and calls to ban it are being made.

So order some Buckie today from Buckfast Abbey, a Benedictine Order in Devon England. Maybe they also sell Benedictine.

edutcher said...

A fine old tradition of the Church.

Bob said...

In Scotland, monk-ey beer contributes to delinquency.

Bob said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
The Drill SGT said...

traditionalguy said...
Tourists in Devonshire often stop at a restored Abby run by monks that had once been a Monastery until Henry VIII expropriated it.

Their claim to fame has been selling Devon Cream Tea at a high cost. That is hot tea served with a scoop of whipped cream on fruit scones.


I think you mean clotted cream...

drozz said...

monks making casks: good
monks making caskets: bad

/gladiclearedthatup

Chip S. said...

What about selling in containers smaller than casks?

You know ... caskettes?

Brew Master said...

Mitchell the Bat said...
Michael Jackson went on record as saying that a claim of having a precious water source is crap, necessitated by a worldwide market for the other ingredients.

No brewery cares to boast about its recipe, which is what makes all discernable difference, excepting naturally ocurring air-borne yeasts, said products comprising a tiny fraction of the market.


This is completely incorrect. Water bears directly on the quality of beer. Natural variations in the minerals contained in water make very significant differences in a beer recipe brewed in different regions.

I can brew the exact recipe for Grolsch, or Bass, or any number of different famous beer styles here in the midwest, the recipes are well known. But unless I adjust my water profile to at least come close to that naturally found in the region that the beer originates my end product will be completely different.