July 7, 2017

"If Lamby had a bad past or was abused, do you think BARC would have adopted him to Lena knowing she’s a new star and put her — or the dog — in that situation?"

"We would have told her if the dog had issues. We are a no-kill shelter. We don’t lie about the dogs’ histories because that gets them returned — and mentally it’s not good for dogs."

Dog shelter fights — in public — with Lena Dunham.
The BARC spokesman went on to write, “It’s just hard to believe the dog was nasty when she took Lamby to every green room with her when Girls was still a thing 4 years ago.” He also criticized Dunham for recently getting two new dogs, which she brought with her to The Tonight Show in February. “[She] didn’t admit she bought her two new dogs [despite writing in the] New Yorker that dogs shouldn’t be dumped or thrown away because they have feelings,” he said.
That's an awfully weird thing for a dog shelter to do. Completely inappropriate. She re-homed a dog, for whatever reasons, and she may have told some white lies about his behavior problems to protect her dignity. The shelter didn't have to go on a public rampage against her. It's one thing to encourage people in general to understand and respect the feelings of animals, quite another to single out an individual to be shamed for failing to meet your (high) standards.

90 comments:

Ralph L said...

Dog shelters have spokesmen?

exhelodrvr1 said...

Damn that Trump!!

Quayle said...

Lefty stars over conservative stars.

Dogs over lefty stars.

Re-homes dogs over new puppies.

It is hard to keep track of the doctrinal heirarchies of today's religions.

Mr. D said...

Self-righteousness is always a growth industry.

Ralph L said...

The shelter didn't have to go on a public rampage against her.
She accused them of lying about a dog's past. How can they stay in business if people don't trust their information?

Dogs don't like being alone. I'm betting that's what caused his issues.

Vince said...

Lena Dunham has dignity?

robother said...

Creepy how she keeps referring to herself as Lamby's mom. But I guess that's the point: by adopting a dog as your child, if its not working out (or you just enjoy the puppy phase) you can just find another mom for your kid. The casual cruelty of these dog parents is stunning. On the other hand, think what miserable parents these hipsters would make.

Kevin said...

quite another to single out an individual to be shamed for failing to meet your (high) standards.

Who do they think they are, CNN?

Ralph L said...

Please respect doghood. It's not yours to appropriate for career purposes.

Laslo Spatula said...

One from the Wayback Machine:

From “Not That Kind of Dog: Lena Dunham’s Puppy Tells You What She’s ‘Learned’.”

I am Laslo.

Marcus Carman said...

Poor attempt at defending what is a pretty despicable person.

Matthew Sablan said...

"Dog shelters have spokesmen?"

-- Big enough ones do, or ones that are associated with larger non-profits, or even small ones probably have someone who's job also includes PR/running the org's Twitter/Facebook.

Eleanor said...

I've had a dog most of my life. The one time I went to a shelter for a dog was the last time. The place is a reputable shelter, and in fairness maybe the original owner didn't tell the whole history of the dog's past, but they never should have labeled the dog "family friendly". We saw him through the rest of his life, muzzling him whenever he left the house, keeping him crated whenever visitors came, and phoning our meter readings into the utility companies. He was a fantastic guard dog, but never quite made it to the lovable family pet they advertised. We took our commitment to give him a good home to heart, but the next dog was a puppy from a reliable breeder, and it continues to be the way I welcome a dog into my house. If I had a friend or family member whose dog I knew, and they needed to re-home it, I might be willing. But taking a dog from a shelter is like buying a book with the first four chapters missing. So much of how a book ends depends on how it starts.

JLScott said...

Dog shelters have spokesmen?

Yes. Some of them are even smart enough to say "DiMaggio".

Rob said...

Forget it, Jake, it's Lena Dunham.

MadisonMan said...

So Dunham lies about this too.

Laslo Spatula said...

Diary of Lena Dunham's Dog (excerpt)...

I'm a dog: I don't understand the peoples. I was so happy-happy to get a home. Home! Home! I could go inside and I could go outside and I could go inside again! Happy Happy!

I thought things they were Good! I like to Play and I like to be with my Peoples -- I wagged my tail A LOT! Wag! I got to go to different places with my Peoples and smell different Things! I couldn't wait to get in the car!

But my Peoples, she would cry a lot. I didn't understand, but I would try to make her Happy Again! I would! I would try to make her Happy Again!

I know I'm just a dog, but I thought things they were Good! I think I said that before, but that was what I thought. Sometimes I didn't like the Peoples she brought home -- they would leave in the middle of the night and she would cry -- but I tried to understand. I never wanted to leave in the middle of the night. Not me: I had a warm place to sleep, I was with my Peoples, and I would get food in the morning: that's Pretty Good!

Sometimes my People would have the Ice Cream. I LIKE ICE CREAM! But she would eat Ice Cream on the couch and cry. I don't get it: you're on the couch, which is Good, AND you're eating Ice Cream which is Good-Good! You have to be a very sad peoples to cry when you are on the couch and eating Ice Cream.

I don't know what happened. We got in the car -- I like car rides! -- but then she took me to a Place and left me. I was Sure she was going to come back for me -- she was my Peoples! -- but every day she didn't come back. Then every day became more every days, and still she didn't come back.

Maybe she is very Sick and doesn't want me to see her that way. But it would be alright, I would understand, I would give her Love and maybe she'd feel better a little.

I don't understand peoples: I think I said that before.

I am Laslo.

robinintn said...

First sentence at the link: "A couple of weeks ago, Lena Dunham revealed on Instagram that she had quietly and discreetly..." How do quietly and discreetly square with revealed on instagram?

Matthew Sablan said...

From just a quick read, I think the spokesman has every right to punch back here. If what this says is true, Dunham lied to people about the dog, and is claiming the dog shelter didn't tell her about the abuse the dog suffered (or didn't.)

If Dunham just rehomed the dog quietly, I'd agree. But she's attacking the shelter's ethics, so they have every right to stand up for themselves (whichever one turns out to be telling the truth.)

Bob Ellison said...

Eleanor, your book metaphor is a good one.

My current dog is a nervous German Shepherd who had a bad first two years of life. I hired a dog trainer to teach me and the dog how to calm her down, and I told him that I thought the dog might have been beaten. He told me that he hears that all the time but finds that it's often just the dog's innate personality.

That makes sense to me. Some dogs, like some people, just have trouble dealing with the world.

My dog has calmed down over a few years of living with a family of humans. She's still nervous, but I think she believes she has a good life now.

Meade said...

@Eleanor, well said. I completely agree.

robinintn said...

As much as I dislike Dunham, I wish she weren't being called out for this because if she couldn't handle the dog, or give him a good home, she is doing the right thing for him by getting him into a better situation.

Hendu said...

Lena Dunham is a shameless self-promoter. If she wanted to be discreet, why did she post anything about this on Instagram?

Fernandinande said...

Our dogs growl when someone says "Frau Blücher", er, I meant "Lena Dunham".

EDH said...

"The shelter didn't have to go on a public rampage against her."

Doxxed...over an ugly dog!

Must have been a... doxhound?

Bob Boyd said...

One option, if you find yourself with a dog you don't like, is to volunteer the troublesome beast for service in the Canine Science Corps. They'll take him off your hands and hook him up with the appropriate research facilities. Win-Win.

rehajm said...

Dog people might be crazier than Lena Dunham.

Jeff Gee said...

"Adopted him to"??

Ralph L said...

My brother has had good luck with 6 shelter animals and 2 stray cats. Well, except for the German Shepherd who snapped me in the face. He didn't like someone directly above him, so it was all my fault.

Matthew Sablan said...

Ralph: Ouch. Most dogs give very clear signals when they do or don't like things; unfortunately, they aren't always warning signals.

Virgil Hilts said...

I find it suspicious that Lamby's twitter account has gone dark. Lamby's instagram page also seems to be inactive. I guess someone doesn't want us to hear Lamby's version of all this. https://www.instagram.com/lamby_antonoff/?hl=en

Matthew Sablan said...

I haven't followed an animal on social media since pancake bunny. *Sigh*

The Internet used to be a simpler place.

Big Mike said...

The shelter didn't have to go on a public rampage against her.

@Althouse, I strongly disagree. A very public person has made an allegation that the shelter gave her a dog with serious issues. The shelter has established a reputation for providing dogs that are safe and family-friendly, and it has to defend that reputation.

Left Bank of the Charles said...

"I still support him financially and I'll always be there for him in every way but he's notably happier in his new surroundings."

Ray said...

Great point Eleanor about adopting a dog!

Personalities do vary, and dogs are pack animals and need company.

My family adopted an Akita that had been beaten, and would stay away from men when we adopted him. I got him past that issue. Super smart dog.

I sympathize with the shelter.

Dogs are like family and are not things, and should not be treated that way. They have feelings.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

I agree that the Shelter had to go on record because Dunham literally accused them of lying, false business practices. Her actions may cause some repercussions for the shelter. They need to defend themselves as Big Mike stated.

Dogs can develop undesirable traits that they didn't have before. When this happens it is usually the owner's fault. Dogs need structure in their lives, routine, discipline, continuity of people around them. Too much moving around, irregular schedules, overly active people, too many people, owners who are unstable, being left alone or in kennels for too long, all can contribute to a doggie mental breakdown.

To people like Dunham, who strikes me as being a supremely narcissistic selfish person, dogs are just accessories to their life. In fact, everyone in a narcissists life is an accessory meant to show the world how wonderful, powerful, kind, caring the narc is. (or whatever trait the narcissist feels they should own). To a narc their spouse, boyfriend, children, dogs all are things that revolve around the narc and exist, not in their own right, but to enhance the ego of the narc.


Todd said...

Are you ALL out of your F-ing minds? This is Lena f-ing Dunham! Lefty, liberal STAR! She is a f-ing ARTIST for cripe's sake! And you all want to pile on her for dumping a dog she tired of and then claiming she was sold a bad apple? Who the hell do you think you are for questioning the motives and honesty of Lena f-ing Dunham? You don't deserve to breath the same air she does! You don't deserve to exist in the same dimension she does! You bunch of NOBODIES! You f-ing bitter clingers and deplorables! HOW DARE YOU!

/snrc

Ann Althouse said...

"'The shelter didn't have to go on a public rampage against her.' She accused them of lying about a dog's past. How can they stay in business if people don't trust their information?"

I think you are misreading it. I think she said the dog had 3 previous homes and had suffered abuse (which gave it behavioral problems that she couldn't handled). I don't think she said the shelter told her there was only one previous home and that the dog had no problems. If I am reading this correctly, she lied about the dog's backstory.

Earnest Prole said...

Meh. Both Dunham and the dog shelter are to blame. The tragedy of life is that everyone has their reasons. You can quote me on that even though I think it was Jean Renoir who actually said it.

Ann Althouse said...

"I was Sure she was going to come back for me -- she was my Peoples! -- but every day she didn't come back. Then every day became more every days, and still she didn't come back. Maybe she is very Sick and doesn't want me to see her that way. But it would be alright, I would understand, I would give her Love and maybe she'd feel better a little. I don't understand peoples: I think I said that before."

That's what most people think about how dogs think about us, but I think (from my study of dogs) that it is more likely that the dog relates to its new environment, attaches to the new people, and doesn't think about the absent human at all. If the absent human were to return, the dog would recognize her and seem excited, but the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there.

Ann Althouse said...

"and is claiming the dog shelter didn't tell her about the abuse the dog suffered"

I'm not seeing that claim.

stonethrower said...

I don't believe this is a case of telling some "white lies .. to protect her dignity." They were lies (of whatever color) to maintain a facade. So, who does get to call her out on this? Anyone? But, not the shelter?

Ralph L said...

She explained, “Lamby suffered terrible abuse as a pup that made having him in a typical home environment dangerous to him and others.”
They hadn't told her that, so she made it up, AKA lying about the shelter's information, certainly from their point of view.

Comanche Voter said...

My wife and I adopted a two year old dog recently from the local Humane Society. It took a while to persuade the folks to let us adopt the dog. It's a volunteer organization, and privately funded. The lady who runs the shelter has been leading the group for 15 years. Her concern is for the dog--not the people who might want to adopt the dog. There are three ways to do things at the Society; the right way, the wrong way, and her way. And by gum Her Way rules. If she thinks you are not right for the dog, you can just shuffle off to Buffalo.

We have had rescue dogs before over a 45 plus year of owning dogs. No problems with any of them--until we got this last one. She suffers from separation anxiety, and we are working with a trainer. It's a long, slow and expensive process. That said, I've never given up on a dog, and I don't intend to start now.

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

Shelters are in a tough position. They need people to adopt the animals, so they need to talk it up and make adoption seem doable, but honestly most people are not really prepared to handle shelter dogs and their various physical and behavioral needs.

Shelters definitely don't need attention whore social media addict asshats like Lena Dunham saying a bunch of easily misinterpreted bullshit to make their noble mission more difficult.

Static Ping said...

I suspect that the shelter's clientele and Lena Dunham fans have a significant overlap. Dunham's actions are essentially advising her fans to not go to this shelter. This is an existential threat to BARC and the response reflects that.

Then again, perhaps the shelter people have been around dogs too much and just bark at anything that looks threatening. If the next Twitter post is about chasing squirrels off the lawn and SAVING THE DAY! then you know what's up.

Ralph L said...

but the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there.
So all the dogs weeping over their dead owners' graves with wreaths of flowers in their mouths are just myths?

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

Yes. Some of them are even smart enough to say "DiMaggio".

+1.

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

Comanche Voter and Eleanor illustrate perfectly why it's not a simple thing to adopt a dog from a shelter. It takes commitment and many people are just not up to that. But you're not going to have a lot of success in getting dogs adopted if you tell everyone who walks by at Petsmart, "It's going to be like having an newborn again, but more of a pain in the ass."

My husband wants to get a dog (because for God's sake, we don't have enough asses in this house already with five cats, five kids and a new baby due in February) to keep me company/for security when he is out of town for work, but I have other ways to spend money than buying a breeder puppy and I certainly don't have the time, energy and patience to work with a shelter dog. I also have safety concerns with a toddler and a baby. Frankly I am surprised that as many people combine small children and dogs as do. They can be unpredictable, especially a dog whose background you don't know. My sister had bad facial injuries when she was 6 from a Dalmation my parents had owned for years and had never so much as nipped at anyone. You just never know what might happen in a dog brain.

Ralph L said...

It sounds like she'd had the dog for 4 years. That's well past the Dog Lemon Law statute of Limitations. Getting 2 more dogs might not have helped things.

Ralph L said...

five kids and a new baby due in February
You really need to find those pants.

Kevin said...

Lena had received all the adoration from adopting the "rescue" dog. All that was left was the drudgery of caring for it. The obvious move was to quietly return it.

Lena writes stories for a living. This was just like whipping up another episode of Girls.

walter said...

That dog witnessed too much to be kept around.
It's in a better place now.

CStanley said...

That's what most people think about how dogs think about us, but I think (from my study of dogs) that it is more likely that the dog relates to its new environment, attaches to the new people, and doesn't think about the absent human at all. If the absent human were to return, the dog would recognize her and seem excited, but the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there.

This is mostly incorrect. (Veterinarian here, and have done a fair amount of study on behavior.)

Many dogs experience separation anxiety. The destruction that some dogs do when left alone is demonstrably related to their "contemplating the missing person." It can be remediated (in most cases) through a combination of training techniques that involve changes to the owner's behavior. One part of this, to the surprise of most owners, is to decrease the excitatory greetings when they return. In other words, the anxious behavior is directly related to the dog's bond to its owner.

It's likely true that "the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there" in the sense that dogs aren't mentally recalling all of the traits they love in their owners- they're thinking of their own sense of calm and order that they derive from the owner's presence. But that' error is just typical of all of the ways we tend to anthropomorphize our pets.

It's also somewhat true that the owner-dog bond can often transfer to new owners, but doing that repeatedly with insecure dogs generally exacerbates their problems.

PatHMV said...

Ann, Dunham's lie about the dog's background is an attack on the shelter, and an inherent claim that they lied to her. She does not appear to have directly attacked the shelter for lying about the dog's background, but (and I grant this is an assumption, but a safe one based on her narcissism and self-promotion) if she had previously broadcast that she had adopted the dog from that shelter (and the dog was clearly widely used as part of her self-promotion), then that is inherently a claim that the shelter made an inappropriate match and gave her a dog with issues they didn't disclose.

Gahrie said...

It's one thing to encourage people in general to understand and respect the feelings of animals, quite another to single out an individual to be shamed for failing to meet your (high) standards.

Where have you been the last thirty years? Does the name PETA ring a bell? This is how the the Left behaves.

walter said...

But it taught her about love and loss.
Maybe this is her stand-in for the abortion she wished she had.
But then, the dog wasn't decapitated.
Sorry N.N.

Rick Turley said...

Don't know about this particular shelter, but the one I volunteered with in Chicago professionally assessed each dog in their system and assigned it a code of some type based on her assessment. People were guided toward a type of dog after discussing their wants and situation with trained volunteers. All dogs and people had to spend time together at the shelter going through various scenarios while being observed by volunteers. Nobody came in and said I want that dog and walked out. Well, except for Oprah Winfrey and a couple of Cocker Spaniels I got into the system but that is a story for another time.

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

You really need to find those pants.

Last one, we promise. ;)

Ron Winkleheimer said...

but the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hachik%C5%8D

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Dunham probably found out the dog was a Trump supporter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfCCwEf_J5A&t=134s

FullMoon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
SF said...

We've had two rescue dogs. First one was some sort of retriever (colored like a golden but coat more like a Lab), a 5yo stray from the Humane Society. She had a few interesting little quirks, but she was a fantastic dog. More recently we got an owner-surrender 4yo yellow Lab from a Lab rescue place. Again, a few interesting quirks -- she's completely unfazed by gunfire but absolutely hates clowns -- but after having her 16 months she's everything I hoped for and more. (knock on wood.)

I've got to say I'm completely with robinintn on this. Whoever is to blame for the issues (shelter, dog, or Dunham), if Dunham and the dog weren't working out, getting it to a new home was the right thing to do.

walter said...

Dunno Moon,
Is it the same dog? Grammar really went downhill.
Maybe accumulated brain trauma explains it.

Ann Althouse said...

"This is mostly incorrect. (Veterinarian here, and have done a fair amount of study on behavior.) Many dogs experience separation anxiety. The destruction that some dogs do when left alone is demonstrably related to their "contemplating the missing person." It can be remediated (in most cases) through a combination of training techniques that involve changes to the owner's behavior. One part of this, to the surprise of most owners, is to decrease the excitatory greetings when they return. In other words, the anxious behavior is directly related to the dog's bond to its owner."

Thanks. I did not mean to refer to the situation where the dog is left alone, but to re-homing a dog, so that it is with different people.

"It's likely true that "the dog does not lie around contemplating a person who isn't there" in the sense that dogs aren't mentally recalling all of the traits they love in their owners- they're thinking of their own sense of calm and order that they derive from the owner's presence. But that' error is just typical of all of the ways we tend to anthropomorphize our pets."

So maybe you'll agree with me about the mental processes of a dog that is put in a new home, with good new owners.

"It's also somewhat true that the owner-dog bond can often transfer to new owners, but doing that repeatedly with insecure dogs generally exacerbates their problems."

We've seen how Zeus acts with us and then how he acts when he goes back to his real owners. He transfers back and forth without any trouble, happy both ways, and never seeming to miss anyone. (But then he's a Labrador Retriever who was acquired from a reputable breeder.)

Ron Winkleheimer said...

To be fair, dogs can tolerate rehoming, otherwise what would be the point of adopting shelter dogs at all. And it is perfectly possible that the dog prefers its new home.

However, some private shelters feel pretty proprietary towards the dogs and have the adopters agree not to rehome them, but to bring the dog back to the shelter if things don't work out so that they can vet (yes, that is intended) the next person who adopts the dog.

MayBee said...

However, some private shelters feel pretty proprietary towards the dogs and have the adopters agree not to rehome them, but to bring the dog back to the shelter if things don't work out so that they can vet (yes, that is intended) the next person who adopts the dog.

That was Dunham's shelter's policy as well, and one of the complaints against what she did.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

she's completely unfazed by gunfire but absolutely hates clowns

Sounds like the perfect dog to me.

We've seen how Zeus acts with us and then how he acts when he goes back to his real owners. He transfers back and forth without any trouble, happy both ways, and never seeming to miss anyone.

We have a friend who brings her dogs over to play with ours when she runs errands occasionally and our experience is the same. We look at it as the dogs see us as part of their pack, but aren't around all the time.

MayBee said...

We've seen how Zeus acts with us and then how he acts when he goes back to his real owners. He transfers back and forth without any trouble, happy both ways, and never seeming to miss anyone. (But then he's a Labrador Retriever who was acquired from a reputable breeder.)

I think different breeds act in different ways. Our herding dog took some adjustment when one of his "flock" was gone from the house or when he was separated from us. When my oldest went to college, my dog was obviously mad at me for at least 2 weeks.

He often stayed with my parents when we were out of town. While he was very happy there, and my parents loved taking care of him, they always noted a difference in him when I was there with him.

But as I said, that's a herding dog.

exiledonmainstreet said...

My sister had bad facial injuries when she was 6 from a Dalmation my parents had owned for years and had never so much as nipped at anyone. You just never know what might happen in a dog brain.

7/7/17, 9:30 AM

Dalmatians are not especially good pets for children.

When I was growing up we had a mutt that was mainly spaniel that was extremely sweet-natured and patient with kids and I have heard good reports from parents about English Springer and Brittany Spaniels. Retrievers are also good but are so big they might overwhelm and knock over small children. Toy dogs are often temperamental, but I think King Charles spaniels are also nice with kids. Of course, a King Charles spaniel wouldn't exactly fulfill any "security" needs.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

@MayBee

When I'm at home and other dogs come over, my dog won't play with them. She stays next to me. However, everyone says she plays with the other dogs when I'm not around. Apparently she is worried that the other dogs will steal me.

CStanley said...

@Maybee and Althouse-
This varies by both breed and individual, according to temperament.. Some dogs transfer easily while others don't. But for dogs that are already known to be insecure (which is usually the root cause of aggression) repeated rehoming is very stresssful and likely to cause problems. Shelters have no other good options but it's important to realize that sometimes it just doesn't work or at the very least will take a LOT of commitment from the new owner.

MayBee said...

I am happy to see this story get some coverage though.

There is so much pressure to adopt a dog from a shelter. It's important to know that isn't always easy, and getting a dog from a legitimate breeder is an equally valid thing to do. It just depends on the dog experience you want and think you are equipped for.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

getting a dog from a legitimate breeder is an equally valid thing to do

If you actually visit the breeder and see the facility. A lot of puppy mills advertise themselves as legitimate breeders.

Also, someone I know is related to someone who operates a private shelter. They often get dogs from legitimate breeders that cannot be sold because they don't conform to the physical standards of the breed. So, that's a good way to get a full blooded dog if you just want a companion and aren't interested in showing it, which is most people.

CStanley said...

Breed rescue groups are often good. They're usually groups of well experienced dog owners, and they foster the dogs in homes while helping them adjust and evaluating their temperaments and needs so they can try to find appropriate matches. So even though it puts an extra step in the chain of owners (which seems to contradict my earlier point about repeated rehoming) that's still probably better than being in a kennel environment during the waiting period and allows for a more thorough evaluation.

Fernandinande said...

CStanley said...
This is mostly incorrect.


You're right, especially regarding re-homing, and even more especially with "one man" dogs like G. Shepherds and such. They remember for years.

MayBee said...
Our herding dog took some adjustment when one of his "flock" was gone from the house or when he was separated from us.


I'm not sure they view other dogs as a their "flock" as opposed to their "pack", but whatever.

We have a herding-mix "res-dog", and took in another stray res-dog which we rehabilitated** over a few months and then found a new home for (rescueme.org). The first dog would sit on my lap and growl if the 2nd dog came near (but not growl at the dog we already had when we took him in), but when the 2nd dog was gone the 1st dog wouldn't sit on my lap for a week - he seemed to be sulking.

**he was really terrified of people but not hand-shy and never snappy or aggressive, but came around pretty quickly with some TLC. Neither had ever been on a leash, or in a car or a house.

vanderleun said...

"She re-homed a dog, for whatever reasons, "

He wouldn't take his place behind her mounting bench?

MayBee said...

I'm not sure they view other dogs as a their "flock" as opposed to their "pack", but whatever.

Well, considering I'm not a dog and neither is my oldest child, I'm not sure how he saw us. I know he tried to herd the kids when they were little, and liked everyone in the same room. So I always thought of us as his flock. But I never asked him.

Laslo Spatula said...

I am sads. My peoples left me. All I wanted was a home and love and to be asked "Who's a Good Dog? Who's a Good Dog?"

And then I would wag my tail and bark "Me! Me! I'M a Good Dog!" But I guess my peoples didn't think I was a Good Dog, so she abandoned me.

I tried real hard to be a Good Dog. Maybe I needed to do better. I don't know what better was, though. I am sads that I didn't do better, whatever better was.

I didn't mean to be a disappointment. I can't look a peoples in the eye now because I am a disappointment. I am Disappointment Dog.

I'm Sorry for being Disappointment Dog.

I am Laslo.

Laslo Spatula said...

If my 12:42 comment doesn't bring a tear to your eye then you have no tear ducts.

I am Laslo.

Ron Winkleheimer said...

Damn it Laslo, you mad me cry!

walter said...

Should have licked the peanut butter, Disappointment Dog.

Fernandinande said...

Laslo Spatula said...
"Who's a Good Dog? Who's a Good Dog?"


God!

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Althouse: We've seen how Zeus acts with us and then how he acts when he goes back to his real owners. He transfers back and forth without any trouble, happy both ways, and never seeming to miss anyone.

Since, (I assume) you live nearby, in the same neighborhood with familiar surroundings the dog has a sense of stability in you and Mead and in his owners. He likely considers you as a part of his pack. A strange part in a way since you are not all in the same den, but still a part of the group he considers his and that you all belong to.

We have some friends that we visit regularly at their house. They have three dogs: a bull mastiff, black lab and a "cow dog" of unknown breed. Because we are frequent visitors and it is obvious by the way the owners treat us that we are accepted friends (part of the pack) the dogs greet us warmly and even follow our commands. Down. Sit. Stay. They don't do this with total strangers. SO...we are a peripheral part of what they consider their group.

That is all so cool that the animals can look at people in this way.

Rick Turley said...

Our shelter would take back any cat or dog after any amount of time and for any reason. Still they would show up at Animal Control or worse. The longest time for cats of which I was aware was 11 years for a matched pair. I didn't work with the dogs.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

Laslo Spatula said...
If my 12:42 comment doesn't bring a tear to your eye then you have no tear ducts.


Ubertool comic - Old Dog

OGWiseman said...

I'm no fan of Lena Dunham--she's a perfect example of how (most) artists should make their art and not ruin it with a public "persona"--but as someone who has adopted a number of shelter dogs, I can report that there is hardly a more misanthropic, self-righteous, unpleasant demographic of people in the known world than employees of dog shelters.

openidname said...

I'm not clear why our hostess thinks the shelter should play nice. Dunham accused it of giving her a defective dog. If false, that is defamatory and almost certainly damaging to the shelter and its mission. The shelter has every right to defend itself.

Bad Lieutenant said...


I'm not clear why our hostess thinks the shelter should play nice. Dunham accused it of giving her a defective dog. If false, that is defamatory and almost certainly damaging to the shelter and its mission. The shelter has every right to defend itself.


Here's a thought. Dunham has no filter; some would say that is her art, or at least, her attraction. She is la boue; she speaks of pebbles.

Consider this hypocrisy. Which is the besetting sin of our time according to many. So she's open and honest enough to use that very candor as an excuse to tell us about her sister, and more generally to have a show which could be best described as deviant and loving it not very much, but she can't get it straight about a lousy dog?

In other words, her crowd is down with sibling Child Abuse, but not with not petting a dog enough?

This creepy girl who campaigned for Obama with a shtick about choosing your first guy? That Lena Dunham? Talk about getting advice from the wrong source!

Bad Lieutenant said...

And to second you more directly, openidname: to use the shelter organization, its good name and its people's as a thing, an object for your gratification, is as

...wrong? Self-centered (WHICH IS A CRITICISM, DAMNIT, NOT A DAMNED COMMENDABLE "LIFE CHOICE")? Infantile? 'Pathic or 'otic in some way or other?...

Is as wrong as so wronging the poor creature in the first place.