April 11, 2017

"Imagine you're the camera taking this picture. Forced to memorize your kind disassembled like that."

"These are cartel methods of torture."

32 comments:

AllenS said...

Sissy's all of them. I don't see a drill, or a baseball bat anywhere.

Michael K said...

I tried that with an outboard motor once. Had pieces left over.

n.n said...

It's a chromatic cluster of electronics. Repeat. It will eventually feel normal, even good.

AReasonableMan said...

Am impressed with the amount of time it would take to assemble the camera. Easy to see where your money goes in this case.

3rdGradePB_GoodPerson said...

"Had pieces left over."

Your training kicked in: better to end up w/ some extra peripheral stuff than to leave a sponge in there somewhere.

buwaya said...

Modern Photo mag (I think it was) used to do this kind of total disassembly back in the day, when doing camera reviews.

Bob Ellison said...

Disassembly is always easier than assembly. Chaos requires no summons; order doesn't even demand it and must be imposed.

I used to assemble simple fireworks. Most of them are pretty simple. Take a multi-stage stick rocket apart, and you can figure out how it is supposed to work. Replicating that is difficult. How do you make it go high enough before major ignition? How do you make Stage 2 wait for Stage 1? How do you make a fuse that works in tough, wet conditions, but still gives you time to run away?

With a camera, or a computer or a car or anything else similarly complex, the answers are simple. Do it a million times, and train the workers and the computers and the machinists.

Imagine the bottle rocket flying up, wondering what will become of his brother. He looks down at the next bottle rocket, waiting below, in the bottle on land.

Michael McClain said...

I can do that in the dark with a M1911A1 and with an M16A1. Cameras aren't my thing.

DanTheMan said...

>>I can do that in the dark with a M1911A1 and with an M16A1.

You can remove every screw, every pin, every spring, every detent ball, every part of the bolt including the extractor, ejector, retaining pins, and springs, the front and rear sights... in the dark? And lay them all out in a neat grid?

No, I don't think you can.

Sebastian said...

Every single bit designed by someone. My guess: white men and a few Asians.

tim maguire said...

Remember Charlie Tuna? Hawking products made from his own body parts.

Guildofcannonballs said...

Well I torture myself thinking:

What they really mean, but are too dumb to convey, like me sometimes, is:

Forced to memorize: you are kind, disassembled like that.


But as a camera, functional with thought for fun, you are not kind, indifference being anything but what Jerry Sang About in Uncle John's Band or indeed that too as you like, like the true purity each individual component summed to the whole adds more than 10lbs of muckish pics of the wrong things grouped together.

You know what I mean, You Know.

You can see the elements, as they were, and consider what went more therefore into the transformation, drama, that change provides given repeatability.

Hence why you shan't go nuts, or make that weird face too often.

Chuck said...

A standard SLR would have been even more interesting, to be honest. Because this was a DSLR, we see a coupled of circuit boards and chips, that are even more complicated than we can see, that would be another whole level of microscopic amazement.

With a standard film SLR, the parts that we saw would have been all there was, to the magic of the photography.

Guildofcannonballs said...

In short: you gotta stop changin' sometimes to change mo'.

Fred Drinkwater said...

Most folks have no idea how many parts there are in even the most mundane objects. In a comment elsewhere, I enumerated the parts in the desk lamp in front of me. With no effort, I got to 160. All of which had to be conceived, designed, manufactured, shipped, and assembled. The culture we all live in can do this at a price most can afford, as long as not too many obstacles are thrown up.

Guildofcannonballs said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_mJmO7d6FI

Guildofcannonballs said...

Intelligent people would say:

Intelligence and politics so pencil and Friedman ergo camera and Althouse.

Drudge wanted to say "shit......" though.

I get it, it ain't okay.

Guildofcannonballs said...

Let us note, as Drudge always, always has, that in the absence or real storms, Gore and Drudge create things unsanitary to write about.

I have done it, on google, for free, and will quit absolutely without any doubt 100% forever if Drudge will only join mere me.

Guildofcannonballs said...

https://www.google.com/search?q=india+shittiest+country&client=opera&hs=sOq&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjkl7Hz9p3TAhVszFQKHdc3DqQQ_AUICCgB&biw=1600&bih=763#imgrc=Vfacj0yhTYXJXM:


Why did google recommend this racist link?>

Wha the Hell kappening?

Guildofcannonballs said...

With no effort, I got to 160


Why not say anybody that takes any effort to understand is a Nazi retard?

You offend my motherfucker.

Take under 1/160 of your autistic ass conscience to think "hey maybe writing you got to 160 with no effort makes all those people whom to get to 1 it takes an effort aren't unworthy of my limited conscious (of others) thoughts reliable."

exiledonmainstreet said...

tim maguire said...
Remember Charlie Tuna? Hawking products made from his own body parts."

That creeped me out too when I wa a kid. He was telling us to eat tuna? His relatives?

I Have Misplaced My Pants said...

Most folks have no idea how many parts there are in even the most mundane objects. In a comment elsewhere, I enumerated the parts in the desk lamp in front of me. With no effort, I got to 160. All of which had to be conceived, designed, manufactured, shipped, and assembled. The culture we all live in can do this at a price most can afford, as long as not too many obstacles are thrown up.

I am constantly amazed by this and point it out to my children all the time. We are surrounded by such mind-boggling complexity at all times, but we take it so for granted. I have no idea how the keyboard I am typing on was manufactured, or how many people were involved in producing the cup of coffee I'm drinking, or whose idea it was to market the University of American Samoa Law School* t-shirt I'm wearing and how he solved all the problems that occurred one by one between the idea of the shirt and having money in his bank account because Mr. Pants bought it for me. It's really astonishing. I love stuff and I'm so happy I have it all available to me. I sometimes like the idea of minimalism, of the simple life living in a tiny cabin with one coffee cup and a library card, but then I remember how much I like the shade of the pink file folders on my desk and beautiful furniture and being able to buy things designed to solve every problem I can think of.

*I love Better Call Saul

Quaestor said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Quaestor said...

I can do that in the dark with a M1911A1 and with an M16A1.

Forget field stripping. Try assembling an AR-15 from a kit. I'm not talking about an 80% lower mated to an upper, that's easy as pie. I mean ASSEMBLY. When I looked at my kit spread out on my poker table I was flabbergasted at the number of parts I had never laid eyes on in a functioning rifle. Springs galore. Tiny springs. And spacers and bushings. I thought the assembly would be a screwdriver thing. It isn't. It's a tweezer thing.

For those of you who don't know, don't care, or are terrified of lethal weapons that look more lethal than they are, the AR-15 is a civilian semi-automatic rifle that shares a number of characteristics with the M-16 and other military weapons of that family. The trigger, the safety, and the hammer (the fire control group) are housed together with the magazine well in what is known as the lower receiver, which also provides attachment for the shoulder stock and recoil spring. The rest of the firearm is called the "upper" and connects to the "lower" by just two metal pins. It would be an embarrassment for anyone, but especially a soldier, if those pins were to fall out of the gun. To prevent this the "takedown" pins are themselves held in place by two small springs called detents. Installing those springs means compressing them into their recesses and anchoring them in place. I discovered that compressing such minute coils is a skill not quickly acquired. On my first attempt, I lost control of the rear detent spring and inadvertently launched it across the room to an as yet undiscovered hiding place. I was pissed. I tried to find the spring with a magnet, but all I found were a few screws and offsets from computer builds. It took three weeks for the manufacturer to send me a correct replacement spring. I was further pissed.

To those who don't understand men and guns, and there are a few of you who visit Althouse, much of the pleasure of these so-called "assault rifles" is just tinkering with them — installing modifications or sights, aligning and zeroing-in for that elusive optimal configuration which allows dead-center bullseyes beyond our natural skill. Everybody wants this. Nobody gets this. Therefore the tinkering continues.

caplight45 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
caplight45 said...

"Imagine you're the camera taking this picture. Forced to memorize your kind disassembled like that."

The closest I have come to experiencing my kind disassembled was assisting in five autopsies. One of my parishioners, a pathologist, was the county coroner and he invited me to join him. It was astounding to disassemble the body and inspect the parts. Alas, we "Couldn't put Humpty together again."

Nyamujal said...

As an engineer, that pic gives me an erection.

Fernandinande said...

Sebastian said...
Every single bit designed by someone. My guess: white men and a few Asians.


I'd guess Asians and maybe a few white guys.

Leica and Hasselblad use Japanese sensors and other electronics; "Since 2012, Hasselblad has been marketing redesigned versions of Sony digital cameras." AFAIK, Zeiss's digital camera contribution is just lenses.

Dunno about other imaging stuff (microscopes, etc) from Leica/Leitz, Zeiss or Hasselblad.

Michael McClain said...

I have assembled/build two AR15's from a pile of parts. Not in dark, but on my own.

Most of the readers of this blog wouldn't know where to begin.

Darcy said...

Forget field stripping. Try assembling an AR-15 from a kit.

My mother worked for Jam Handy during WWII. She was filmed field stripping some kind of military weapon as part of a military tutorial. She was both good at it and happened to be a knockout.

I wish I could find that footage.

Rusty said...

It would be easier if it were arranged in the order it was taken apart, but its doable.
ARM there are dozens of subassemblies many of which are assembled automatically. Sub assemblies are gathered up and mated to other assemblies before the final product is assembled.
Remember; "Assembling Japanese bicycle require great peace of mind."

Rusty said...

Blogger Fred Drinkwater said...
"Most folks have no idea how many parts there are in even the most mundane objects. "

Fred most people have no idea HOW things are made. Where the raw materials come from and how they're processed.
"Oh. It's made from steel."
"OK. How is steel made?"
The proof was in all the envioronmentalists in their plastc kayaks protesting the movement of a floating oil drilling rig.