March 14, 2017

"Bharara’s refusal to resign wasn’t about the assertion of any sort of constitutional principle, or rule-of-law value."

"In fact, a respect for the rule of law would have required him to treat the chief executive’s legitimate powers with respect. But — and I want to be clear here — Bharara’s refusal to resign wasn’t about principle. It was about putting himself publicly on the side of anti-Trump Democrats, no doubt in the expectation of future rewards, political or professional. It was not a brave act. It was, in fact, a species of corruption. A prosecutor so willing to disrespect the constitutional chain of command for petty personal reasons is one who’s not fit to wield the enormous power that federal prosecutors possess."

Writes Glenn Reynolds (who also criticizes Bharara for "subpoena[ing] Reason Magazine for the names of commenters who had made over-the-top (but not actionable) comments about a federal judge Bharara practiced before — and then bann[ing] Reason from publicizing the subpoena by subjecting them to a gag order").

133 comments:

rehajm said...

Almost as if he was making publicity for himself in advance of running for office or something.

David Begley said...

PB just positioning himself for a run for NY governor as a brave reformer to clean out the corruption in Albany.

Humperdink said...

Cuomo and Big Bird (aka DeBlasio) remain unindicted. Preet wanted it to remain that way.

My opinion.

MikeR said...

Too bad, though. He was the most effective guy around at clearing out corruption, both Republican and Democrat.

traditionalguy said...

Not to worry. He was born in India and has no Hawaiian Certificate of Live Birth forged yet.

That was a redeeming story that too nice a guy Sessions desperately needed. Trump must have ordered him to do it.

Mark said...

It was not a brave act. It was, in fact, a species of corruption.

What he said, except with respect to the "Office of Government Ethics" which has been making an awful lot of political noise since the election.

Triangle Man said...

I want to be clear here. Glenn Reynold's opinion on Bhara wasn't about principle. It's about publicly putting himself on the side of pro-Trump Republicans no doubt in the expectation of future rewards, political or professional. It was not a brave act. It was, in fact, a species of corruption.

I like Instapundit when he offered interesting opinions on the role of technology in society and his lightly-anti-establishment libertarian view point. Now he's just another partisan hack.

khesanh0802 said...

Reynolds is 100% accurate. It was an act of political showmanship for his own benefit. The Dems prove daily that they have no principles, no ethics, no honor.

Nyamujal said...

@MikeR

I agree. Preet was involved in a number of high profile cases including this one:
"New York’s Gabriel Sherman reports that the criminal probe, according to sources, is looking into whether Fox News executives illegally obtained journalists’ phone records, and whether they committed mail and wire fraud by hiding settlements paid to the women who accused Ailes of sexual harassment."

Preet will be replaced with Roger Aile's lawyer Marc Mukasey.

MikeR said...

"I want to be clear here. Glenn Reynold's opinion on Bhara wasn't about principle. It's about..." Instead of being clear, how about offering some reasons for your opinion?

Bob Ellison said...

This notion of US Attorneys being strictly political appointees, serving at the President's whim and fancy, whisk-awayable at will, is a modern and weird one that makes no sense.

Does justice have no bias? US Attorneys are expected to be biased, political animals? Really? That's crazy.

I'd like to see a debate on this.

Mark said...

Maybe Marc Mukasey will subpoena Google/Blogger for the real names and information on MikeR and Triangle Man. That's Bharara’s idea of ethics and what a government lawyer should do.

Mark said...

That action alone is enough to show that Bharara is himself corrupt.

Mark said...

That subpoena business and also any attempt to use the power of government to investigate and criminalize what is standard operating procedure in most lawsuits, the confidentiality of monetary settlements, both demonstrate an abuse of power.

Nyamujal said...

Preet met Trump after the election and Trump asked him to stay on. It seems like Trump reneged on his promise. If my boss tried pulling shit like that, I'd be pretty pissed too.

cubanbob said...

Triangle Man said...
I want to be clear here. Glenn Reynold's opinion on Bhara wasn't about principle. It's about publicly putting himself on the side of pro-Trump Republicans no doubt in the expectation of future rewards, political or professional. It was not a brave act. It was, in fact, a species of corruption."

Did you miss the part of the story regarding Reason magazine? He along with the judge ought to be disbarred for that at the minimum. Reynolds is right. The guy needed firing.

TreeJoe said...

Here's the reason I tend to give Bharara some credence here:

- He met with Trump pre-inauguration and publicly said Trump asked him to stay on indefinitely. There was no pushback to this statement and it stood for months.

- He's pretty well respected across both parties.

- He was the only US attorney I know of who shared an endorsement by Trump to stay on.

- He was given the same "same day notice" as the rest and his reaction was to decline to resign.

This is not the background of a political hack. It's the background of someone who worked hard to earn respect, was told he was staying on, and then was burned by being told to hand in his resignation out of the blue and contrary to prior statements.

Trump's made alot of good moves. But Bharara is a question mark still.

Sebastian said...

"Bharara’s refusal to resign wasn’t about principle. It was about putting himself publicly on the side of anti-Trump Democrats, no doubt in the expectation of future rewards, political or professional." Duh.

Nyamujal said...

@Mark
"Maybe Marc Mukasey will subpoena Google/Blogger for the real names and information on MikeR and Triangle Man. That's Bharara’s idea of ethics and what a government lawyer should do."

If you look at his record, the good outweighs the bad.

Trumpit said...

This makes no sense to me at all. Why would Trump simply fire Mr. Bharara when he could accuse him of wiretapping Trump Tower in cahoots with President Obama? I believe that Preet Bharara was insulted that Trump didn't tweet about him (at 3 a.m.) as a Trump Tower burglar. He was not about to go quietly.

MikeR said...

"This is not the background of a political hack. It's the background of someone who worked hard to earn respect, was told he was staying on, and then was burned by being told to hand in his resignation out of the blue and contrary to prior statements."
Why is this hard? Usually these lawyers are all fired by the incoming administration. Trump thought he would be good to stay on. Turned out he wasn't, for whichever reason. No biggie.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "Preet met Trump after the election and Trump asked him to stay on. It seems like Trump reneged on his promise. If my boss tried pulling shit like that, I'd be pretty pissed too."

Preet serves at the pleasure of the President. Being pissed off (and we do not really know the truth behind any "he wants me to stay" claims) provides precisely zero justification for not following the Presidents directives in this matter where the Presidents power to appoint and ask for resignations is beyond legal dispute.

Of course, given that you have no legal or rational basis for complaining you, like the rest of the left, continue to attempt to mis-characterize the normal activities of government as somehow unethical if executed by Trump.

Reynolds is correct. There is no principle involved here. Nothing but leftists being "pretty pissed" that they aren't in power and throwing tantrums everyday over everything.

gadfly said...

I still think that politics are getting in the way of considering why Trump really changed his mind about keeping Bharara in the first place - two groups asked Bharara to investigate activities of the Trump Organization - Uday, Qusay, et al. After all, Mr. Bharara was investigating Mayor De Blasio's fund raising and was after several members of Andrew Cuomo's campaign staff. There was an indication that Sessions had reassured him that his job was safe - and two attorneys were held over after the purge.

Todd said...

Triangle Man said...
I want to be clear here. Glenn Reynold's opinion on Bhara wasn't about principle. It's about publicly putting himself on the side of pro-Trump Republicans no doubt in the expectation of future rewards, political or professional. It was not a brave act. It was, in fact, a species of corruption.

I like Instapundit when he offered interesting opinions on the role of technology in society and his lightly-anti-establishment libertarian view point. Now he's just another partisan hack.

3/14/17, 10:08 AM


Sure cause everyone knows it was Bharara's job. It is not like he serves at the pleasure of the President or something, that fascist Trump!

Fernandinande said...

It was about putting himself publicly on the side of anti-Trump Democrats,

Well, he IS quite the enthusiast for state suppression of speech; besides harassing Reason.com over some stupid commenters, Preet (Preet! Preet!) persecuted a guy who was handing out pamphlets on citizens' rights to "jury nullification", and charged him with jury tampering. It was thrown out of court.

Jim Gust said...

The first wholesale firing of the US attorneys that I recall was Bill Clinton in 1993. Was it a "tradition" before that? As I recall, there was some noise that his action was unprecedented.

Soon after we had "Travelgate."

Bob Ellison, the Democrats politicized justice, both judges and attorneys, going back to Bork. Not a good thing, but hard to stop once started.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "If you look at his record, the good outweighs the bad."

The "bad" includes violations against American citizens rights. You know, rights of actual citizens, unlike the fake "rights" the Left wants to extend to illegals.

Of course, your position is probably something along the lines of -no rights for republicans/conservatives/libertarians!- which are just "other" labels the Left uses to identify (in their opinion), fascists.

I thank you for your transparency, not that it wasn't already on full display.

AprilApple said...

related: MSM news media hackery - through the decades.

Kevin said...

Oh come on, being seen as "standing up to" Trump in any way will be seen as principled by half the country these days, inconvenient facts not withstanding.

Drago said...

gadfly: " still think that politics are getting in the way of considering why Trump really changed his mind about keeping Bharara in the first place..."

Perhaps Trump and his staff have determined that its reached a point where it's simply not worth spending significant amounts of time/effort in ensuring any, ANY, obama holdovers are worth the holding-over and just to be rid of them all as fast as possible.

If the action taken were for that reason alone it would be prudent given what we are seeing from the combined Obama holdovers and their MSM pals.

AprilApple said...

2009: Josh Gerstein reports "Obama to Replace US Attorneys"

2017: Josh Gerstein reports "Trump team ousts Obama-appointed U.S. attorneys"


NOTICE THE WORDS USED.

When a D does it, it's all good. When an R does it, hack press reports like its some sort of Palace coup.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"Of course, given that you have no legal or rational basis for complaining you, like the rest of the left, continue to attempt to mis-characterize the normal activities of government as somehow unethical if executed by Trump."

Let's give Trump the benefit of the doubt here. Let's assume that getting rid of a fairly competent corruption busting lawyer like Preet is normal run of the mill transition activity. I still think it's a dumb move. If you want to "drain the swamp" maybe you should start by keeping the people who're already doing it.

traditionalguy said...

Andrew Jackson Trump says he wants to make the appointments. That is how political Parties in the USA have worked since 1832. It is used to make DEALS for support in elections.

Sorry to shock anyone who lives in an idealist delusion. Jackson got his start as an Attorney in politics. That is also how Schumer and his bff in New York politics, Bharara, do it.

As President elect, Trump wanted a working relationship with Schumer and offered him Bharara to stay on. As we all know Schumer broke that deal every which way he could think of to say FU to Trump.

So Schumer fired Bharara.

sunsong said...

Instapundit has been lost for years.

Nyamujal said...

"Perhaps Trump and his staff have determined that its reached a point where it's simply not worth spending significant amounts of time/effort in ensuring any, ANY, obama holdovers are worth the holding-over and just to be rid of them all as fast as possible."

He's going to replace all those holdovers with really competent people I assume. "The very best". Pro Publica has a nice series on the people Trump's installing across the government:
https://www.propublica.org/article/meet-hundreds-of-officials-trump-has-quietly-installed-across-government
The best and the brightest...Ha, what a fucking sham.

Todd said...

sunsong said...

Instapundit has been lost for years.

3/14/17, 10:50 AM


LOL!

AprilApple said...

Sungsong - powdered koolaid is not for snorting.

Marty Keller said...

Sunsong/Inka has been lost for centuries.

See? Anybody can play!

AprilApple said...

In 1993, Clinton fired 93 US Attorneys.

Media, arm to the democrat lie machine, ignores completely.


In March 1993, Clinton Attorney General Janet Reno ordered the resignation of all 93 U.S. attorneys, all of whom were Reagan and Bush appointments. A Justice Department official told CNBC that Sessions still has the letter that Reno sent to him at the time.

The actual letter is at the link - scroll down.

Bruce Hayden said...

This is the guy who sent Dinesh D'Souza to a halfway house on the other end of the country for better than half a year (he was pushing for 5 years hard time, and it was the judge who gave the leniency) ostensibly for the crime of making a roughly $5k illegal political donation to a good friend from college, but in reality, for writing books and making a film critical of this guy's boss, Obama. Many of us have read D'Souza's book on his experiences there, and the major villain in the whole thing, the guy who routinely turned a blind eye NDA eye to hundreds of thousands in political contributions, was fellow Indian Bharara.

And that may indeed have factored into the decision to fire the guy. Likely, when he met with Trump, Trump didn't know yet Bharara's history of being an Obama hatchet man. I am pretty sure that Trump knew who D'Souza is, since he is a regular on Fox News. 8 months in the halfway house on the W coast for the petty crime of a $5k political contribution is not just extreme, but vendictive. Once Bharara's sordid past came out, and that he had done it likely because of the anti-Obama movie, the guy had to go. Too many of the right respect and like D'Souza to let this guy stay on. Probably would have been better though to have had the US Marshalls shoot the guy when he didn't send in his resignation, than wasting the President's time. Bharara Is slime, and, no doubt a lot of them would have volunteered for the job.

Bruce Hayden said...

Anyone with any remaining sympathy for this guy needs to read the first couple chapters of D'Souza's book: 2015: "Stealing America: What My Experience with Criminal Gangs Taught Me about Obama, Hillary, and the Democratic Party", Broadside Books (ISBN 978-0062366719).

Big Mike said...

Does justice have no bias? US Attorneys are expected to be biased, political animals? Really? That's crazy.

@Bob Ellison, it may be crazy, but it's been the way things are done at least since the Kennedy years. I assert that Barack Obama lowed the political hackery of the Department of Justice to new depths, and point to Holder's ordering the Black Panthers settlement dropped even though the case had been won to bolster my claim. But it isn't in any way new.

Chuck said...

One of the complications with the firing of Bharara was that Trump met with him, on November 30, 2016.

And at that time, Trump and Bharara announced that Bharara would be staying on as USA in the Southern District of NY.

I never understood that. Preet Bharara has been a near-constant source of criticism by the editorial page writers at the Wall Street Journal. He'd be one of the first USA's that Republicans would have wanted out, forcefully, as soon our party took the White House. Only Trump's personal fascination with people in the news, and perhaps Trump's weird personal-vendetta thing with people on Wall Street would have explained the meeting and that earlier agreement.

It seems to have been of a piece, with Trump's astonishingly idiotic meeting with RFKJr about some sort of vaccine-danger committee.

I agree completely with the firing of Bharara. But it was needlessly clouded by Trump's own rotten management.

Chuck said...

Here's the link I meant to post in my comment of a moment ago:

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/trump-meeting-preet-bharara-us/2016/11/30/id/761401/

Trump's meeting with Bharara. During the transition. And Jeff Sessions appears to have been involved. So I am perfectly ready and willing to blame Sessions as well, much as I hate to do so.

Drago said...

"lifelong republican" Chuck: "I agree completely with the firing of Bharara."

LOL

EDH said...

Maybe Bruce Hayden can help with this...

How did PB happen upon evidence of D'Souza's straw campaign contributions?

I know they said it was a routine review of campaign finance paperwork. But I'm not sure how that would reveal straw donations that were later privately reimbursed, or even the evidentiary basis that could provide for a warrant to, say, look at D'Souza's bank records.

More insidious and likely to find the money trail would be if the government was looking at D'Souza punitively for his speech against Clinton/Obama, specifically sifting his bank records, and came upon payments to the straw donors and only then matched them to campaign finance records.

Any idea in what order the investigation proceeded?

Left Bank of the Charles said...

Being asked to resign is a courtesy. You're being fired but you're being allowed to resign. Bharara chose not to accept the courtesy. Was that uncourteous of him? Perhaps. Or, perhaps Sessions fired all the holdover U.S. Attorneys at the same time as cover for firing Bharara.

Drago said...

Left Bank: "Or, perhaps Sessions fired all the holdover U.S. Attorneys at the same time as cover for firing Bharara."

Riiiiiiiiiiiight.

Because no one fires ALL the previous administrations US Attorneys at the same time.

No one.

Keep digging. There has got to be a pony in there somewhere.

Danno said...

Bruce Hayden, thanks for raising the Dinesh D'Souza angle on this thread. The comments didn't touch that elephant in the room until you brought it up.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "If you want to "drain the swamp" maybe you should start by keeping the people who're already doing it."

Apparently Preet is the only attorney in NY who can help drain the swamp.

That's a real shame. I was hoping there would be more than 1.

Gahrie said...

I agree completely with the firing of Bharara. But it was needlessly clouded by Trump's own rotten management.

Ok..perhaps there is no hacker....

But how many lifelong Republicans would agree with the actions of a Republican president, but give the Republican president shit for doing it anyway?

Rick said...

So Democrats are impressed by a self-serving bureaucrat eager to crush people simply to prove he can. I'm shocked by this perfect confluence of interests.

Static Ping said...

The resignation request is a courtesy. The President can always fire the lot of them on demand for any reason whatsoever, the attorneys are well aware of this and know to expect it if the President changes, and the only thing to be gained by refusing to resign is to make a stink. I can certainly understand if he is surprised given he was asked to stay on, but that's not a reason to refuse to resign unless he is waiting for confirmation of the request. So, yes, Glenn is almost certainly correct. It's not even controversial really.

Jupiter said...

Preet Bharara is a typical grand-standing State's Attorney. Whether his ambitions are political or merely professional we will know soon enough. His popularity, such as it is, is simply due to the waters he fishes in. The Southern District of New York provides an unending supply of thoroughly disreputable criminals, and Bharara gets extra credit because even the innocent people he harasses are extremely wealthy.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Bharara's refusal to resign is of a piece with Tom Cruise in A Few Good Men:

I object! - Overruled - I *strenuously* object!

Without people's worthless loaded guesses (though I find the Schumer angle plausible), I would like to know: why Trump kept him initially, and why he fired him later.

I'm sure there are reasons. Aside from Schumer, I would think it was because Sessions wasn't in place then. But I don't know and I don't value my guesses, or anyone else's, very highly.

Bharara was doing the Lord's work chasing Cuomo and Wilhelm, but if one man is the only one who can do such a job, I'd expect more assassinations.

Nyamujal said...

@AprilApple
"In 1993, Clinton fired 93 US Attorneys.

Media, arm to the democrat lie machine, ignores completely. "

I like that you seem to be conceding that Trump is just doing what his predecessors did and is acting like a politician. I'm willing to concede that Trump isn't a major departure from politics as usual. What's different is that his administration is utterly and completely incompetent. It's run by people I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin Donuts. And sadly we'll end up paying dearly for it. I don't know about you, but a lot of people my age have a lot to lose if he really fucks things up re: domestic and foreign policy.

Bad Lieutenant said...

What's your age?

Todd said...

Bad Lieutenant said...

3/14/17, 12:23 PM


In the end, it really does not matter why President Trump cut him loose. Heck, Trump could have taken offense at the man's socks. It just does NOT matter at all. He served at the pleasure of the President and the President may release him fro that service for any reason and for no reason. Anyone attempting to make anything out of this is just looking for an excuse to rant...

David said...

Reynolds is precisely correct. The prosecutors love their power. That is why it's proper that it's easy to replace them. Judges need protected tenure, not prosecutors.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "I'm willing to concede that Trump isn't a major departure from politics as usual."

The entire lefts/MSM/"Lifelong republican" actions since Trumps election very easily puts the lie to this assertion.

Nyamujal: "It's run by people I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin Donuts."

Tillerson, Chief Executive of Exxon-Mobil.
Mattis, 'nuff said!
Kelly, 'nuff said!
Mnuchin, Chief Executive of Dune Capital, Partner at Goldman-Sachs
Wilber Ross, successful investor known as a "turnaround artist" who has acquired failing businesses and made them profitable

etc.

Yeah, what would those guys know about running businesses?

Thanks for your input Nyamujal! It's a darn shame we don't have a successful entrepreneur and business genius like Robert Reich running things.

Yancey Ward said...

It is the president's prerogative to change his mind, if that is indeed what Trump did with respect to Bharara.

Bharara should have done as requested- submitted the resignation without public comment. That he didn't and made a public show of it makes it abundantly clear that he wasn't worth retaining. Not even a close call.

Angel-Dyne said...

Nyamujal: I like that you seem to be conceding that Trump is just doing what his predecessors did and is acting like a politician. I'm willing to concede that Trump isn't a major departure from politics as usual. What's different is that his administration is utterly and completely incompetent. It's run by people I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin Donuts.

Funny, a lot of people felt that way about the previous administration. Throw in a couple of bucks, and your blowhard assertions and theirs will buy a cup of coffee at said donut joint.

I don't know about you, but a lot of people my age have a lot to lose if he really fucks things up re: domestic and foreign policy.

I and a lot of other people around here have children, and are very glad Hillary Clinton is not in the White House.

I'll let you know when I think it's a good idea to base my judgments concerning my children's future on the deep thoughts of some ignorant twenty-something mouther of conventional leftist bullshit.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago

We'll find out. If the rollout of the first immigration order is any indication ("malevolence tempered by incompetence") we're in for a bumpy ride.
BTW, Tillerson has been cut out of a lot of FP decision making by the white house. He didn't even know when his Mexican counterpart was in town: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/11/us/politics/rex-tillerson-trump-white-house.html
I like Mattis, he's an exception. But he wields little influence at the white house too.
The ProPublica link has profiles of other staff members who I still maintain I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin.


Mark said...

Termination now does not necessarily entail Trump changing his mind. Asking someone to stay on "indefinitely" does not mean stay forever or that the position is definitely his permanently. "Indefinitely" means temporary. It means stay until the president decides that it is time to go, as it generally would be when other team members are now in place.

And this is not unique to government. In many places in the private sector, when there is a change in leadership, there is always a chance of people being let go simply because the new boss wants new people.

Mark said...

very glad Hillary Clinton is not in the White House

Then there are the times when completely non-partisan people in a completely non-partisan job with absolutely no power over anything political, something like travel, for example, where the people who have been there for many different administrations are tossed out on the street and falsely accused of wrongdoing simply because Hillary wants to put her friends in the office.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "The ProPublica link has profiles of other staff members who I still maintain I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin."

No one cares who you would trust to run anything.

In fact, your opposition is likely prima facie evidence that someone should be trusted to run something.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "@Drago We'll find out. If the rollout of the first immigration order is any indication ("malevolence tempered by incompetence") we're in for a bumpy ride."

Well, we'll just have to cross that "Red Line" when we come to it!

Riddle: BTW, what did Ted Kennedy say to Mary Jo Kopechne when she told him she might be pregnant with his child?

Ans: We'll cross that bridge when we come to it.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "BTW, Tillerson has been cut out of a lot of FP decision making by the white house. He didn't even know when his Mexican counterpart was in town"

When I want an objective and accurate description of what republicans are talking about and doing behind the scenes I know I can always turn to the NYT's......LOL.

The NYT is like some sort of pacifier for the lefties. Quite amusing.

Nyamujal said...

@Angel-dyne
"I and a lot of other people around here have children, and are very glad Hillary Clinton is not in the White House.

I'll let you know when I think it's a good idea to base my judgments concerning my children's future on the deep thoughts of some ignorant twenty-something mouther of conventional leftist bullshit."

You clearly aren't a policy person, and I've gleaned that your politics are a product of mostly spite and a hatred of elites and foreigners. You really have to face the fact that Trump's policies are a manifestation of the worst qualities of the baby boomer generation. By the late 1990s, when members of my cohort were still young, boomerism and its cult of "greed is good" or "selfishness is a virtue" really expressed itself in financial scandals, economic inequality, mounting debt, unaddressed climate change, a growing entitlements crisis, and more. We're still suffering the effects of it. Previous generations show no appetite for maintaining the assets their parents accumulated. They came of age in an era of government largesse and public higher education, nearly free for them, which has now become dauntingly expensive. Infrastructure is neither built nor maintained, and not even “responsible” boomers take this seriously. Trump's doing nothing to address the issues we face including entitlements because his base of older voters depends on it. You're mistaken or plain wrong if you think anything Trump's doing will help your children.

Angel-Dyne said...

Nyamujal: The ProPublica link has profiles of other staff members who I still maintain I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin.

"That article that I linked to has stuff in it that agrees with the stuff I just said."

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "You clearly aren't a policy person, and I've gleaned..."

That's some funny stuff right there.

Drago said...

One shudders when contemplating the horrific effects of "unaddressed climate change" has had on Nyamujal.

Why, I'll bet there are at least 3 less accessibly ATM machines in his/her vicinity which makes cash withdrawals all the more difficult.

Nyamujal, I entreat you to endeavor to persevere!

readering said...

I used to think Billions exaggerated the US Attorney character. Now it doesn't seem like such an exaggeration.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"When I want an objective and accurate description of what republicans are talking about and doing behind the scenes I know I can always turn to the NYT's......LOL.

The NYT is like some sort of pacifier for the lefties. Quite amusing."

It is. I hug my copy of the NYT in bed when I feel lonely.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "It is. I hug my copy of the NYT in bed when I feel lonely."

Well, then it is certainly worth every peso...er, penny you spend on it.

gadfly said...

@Danno said...
Bruce Hayden, thanks for raising the Dinesh D'Souza angle on this thread. The comments didn't touch that elephant in the room until you brought it up.

"Dinesh D'Souza pleaded guilty to one count on federal charges detailed in an indictment accusing him of violating campaign finance laws and making false statements. D'Souza admitted in front of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, that he did in fact ask two people to make contributions in their name and later reimbursed them, knowing it was not proper under the law. D'Souza submitted a plea deal ... and the charge of making false statements was dropped."

So what's the angle. D'Souza admitted his guilt.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"One shudders when contemplating the horrific effects of "unaddressed climate change" has had on Nyamujal."

Oops, I'm sorry I forgot that climate change is a Chinese hoax created to make US manufacturing non-competitive. I feel so much better now.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"That's some funny stuff right there."

I for one look forward to your brilliant macroeconomic analysis of the Trump budget.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "I for one look forward to your brilliant macroeconomic analysis of the Trump budget"

Alas, I cannot say the same for yours.

I appreciate that you looked up the word "macroeconomic" for use in your last missive. It's adorable.

Gahrie said...


Oops, I'm sorry I forgot that climate change is a Chinese hoax created to make US manufacturing non-competitive


No...climate change is a progressive hoax created to allow the political Left to control and loot Western economies.

Drago said...

BTW,

"Nyamujal, I entreat you to endeavor to persevere!"

Points to anyone who can identify the movie/character where "endeavor to persevere" was used.

Mark said...

So what's the angle

Selective prosecution.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "Oops, I'm sorry I forgot that climate change is a Chinese hoax created to make US manufacturing non-competitive. I feel so much better now."

The climate has always been changing. Perhaps you meant to write about AGW, which was the original marxist line of attack.

Perhaps you could also indicate what the appropriate "climate" (including temperatures globally) should be within whatever variance band you would like so we could understand the baseline from whence you proceed.

Not to worry. Even though the "science is settled" we know you don't have this answer.

Mark said...

Outlaw Josey Wales

Mark said...

Some government official used it in a story related by Chief Dan George.

Drago said...

Still waiting to hear from Nyamujal about the effects of "climate change" on his/her life.

I'm almost afraid to look!

Perhaps one of the effects is an inability to abide by Presidential directive where the President has sole discretion.

Drago said...

Mark: "Some government official used it in a story related by Chief Dan George."

We have a winner. What's funniest is what Chief Dan George says after that.

Drago said...

gadfly: "So what's the angle. D'Souza admitted his guilt"

D'Souza has never denied that he did this.

His point, and Alan Dershowitz' as well, is that this was extraordinarily selective prosecution during a campaign and silenced a very public critic of obama.

FullMoon said...

Nyamujal said... [hush]​[hide comment]

@Drago

We'll find out. If the rollout of the first immigration order is any indication ("malevolence tempered by incompetence") we're in for a bumpy ride.


Yeah. On the other hand, many see obstruction and malevolence on the part of the leftists courts and those who support them.
Trump asked for a temporary ban, in order to make vetting better. In a couple of months, he would have announced, everything is hunky dory now, we are lifting the ban. His voters that gave a damn are happy he followed through. SJW happy immigration continues. Trump happy because he looks like he did something.
Instead, lefties continue with divisiveness simply to make Trump look bad. A lot of low information voters are beginning to tire of the constant nagging and whining about every little thing.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"Alas, I cannot say the same for yours.

I appreciate that you looked up the word "macroeconomic" for use in your last missive. It's adorable."

You got me. I had to look it up. Since you're so knowledgeable, perhaps you can explain some macroeconomic concepts like DSGE to me. Don't worry, I'm sure that after years of training in math and engineering I might just be able to follow your math.

Angel-Dyne said...

Nyamujal: You clearly aren't a policy person...

Lol.

...and I've gleaned that your politics are a product of mostly spite and a hatred of elites and foreigners.

Considering my life-long interests and life experiences, one of the recurrent ironic delights of life on the internet is being accused of being a "xenophobe" or "hater of foreigners".

You really have to face the fact that Trump's policies are a manifestation of the worst qualities of the baby boomer generation.

There's no pompous jackass like a young pompous jackass.

By the late 1990s, when members of my cohort were still young, boomerism and its cult of "greed is good" or "selfishness is a virtue" really expressed itself in financial scandals, economic inequality, mounting debt, unaddressed climate change, a growing entitlements crisis, and more. We're still suffering the effects of it. Previous generations show no appetite for maintaining the assets their parents accumulated. They came of age in an era of government largesse and public higher education, nearly free for them, which has now become dauntingly expensive. Infrastructure is neither built nor maintained, and not even “responsible” boomers take this seriously. Trump's doing nothing to address the issues we face including entitlements because his base of older voters depends on it. You're mistaken or plain wrong if you think anything Trump's doing will help your children.

Lol^2. The spluttering self-righteousness, the meandering effusions of random talking points (not apropos of anything), the mindless attribution (projection, rather) of true-believing onto interlocutors who have never evinced any such tendency - well, it's all about par for mid-wits of your age. But the pomposity is precocious and well above the average.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"The climate has always been changing. Perhaps you meant to write about AGW, which was the original marxist line of attack.

Perhaps you could also indicate what the appropriate "climate" (including temperatures globally) should be within whatever variance band you would like so we could understand the baseline from whence you proceed."

Variance band! Oh my, I'll see myself out. You're clearly a climate science expert.

Todd said...

Drago said... [hush]​[hide comment]
gadfly: "So what's the angle. D'Souza admitted his guilt"

D'Souza has never denied that he did this.

His point, and Alan Dershowitz' as well, is that this was extraordinarily selective prosecution during a campaign and silenced a very public critic of obama.

3/14/17, 2:23 PM


Wasn't that Obama fella the one that had the fund raising web site that had that funny little coding "bug" in it that failed to block foreign money contributions that were and are against the law?

Or was I thinking of the Hillary fund raising system that repeatedly charged contributor's credit cards even though they only signed up for a one time payment?

Hard to remember as they were both SO extensively covered in the press and with all of the charges filed and court cases, NOT...

Nyamujal said...

@Angel-Dyne
"Considering my life-long interests and life experiences, one of the recurrent ironic delights of life on the internet is being accused of being a "xenophobe" or "hater of foreigners".
"

I'm curious. Can you expand on that?

Nyamujal said...

@Angel-Dyne
"Lol^2. The spluttering self-righteousness, the meandering effusions of random talking points (not apropos of anything), the mindless attribution (projection, rather) of true-believing onto interlocutors who have never evinced any such tendency - well, it's all about par for mid-wits of your age. But the pomposity is precocious and well above the average."

Clearly I'm mistaken. Could you talk about the aspects of Trumpism you think will help pompous young jackasses like myself? Any policies you see beneficial to the country in the long run?

Bruce Hayden said...

@gadfly - yes. But you obviously haven't read the book. This was about as de minimus as campaign violations come, but Bahara personally requested the judge impose the maximum 5 years of prison for someone who had never been arrested before in his life. If D'Souza had not writing his books, and produced a film so critical of Obama (and gotten a lot of play in the conservative media esp for his film), it is highly likely, almost a certainty, that the DoJ wouldn't have wasted their resources on this minor of a violation. Keep in mind that big Crooked Hillary supporters in the last election were routinely contributing > $100k to her ($1/4 million per couple), and much more, bundled, by the simple expedient of writing separate checks to the 50 state Dem parties, which then promptly cut checks back to the DNC for identical amounts. We are talking couples contributing 100x what D'Souza did, quasi-legally. He admitted in the book that he should have hired an atty first, but was naive enough that he didn't know that he needed to. (And, yes, this was one of those situations where Bahara was going after someone without the resources to fight back.

Still, the big thing about it, above and beyond prosecution of such a rinky dink campaign finance violation, was the animus that Bahara showed when he personally pushed the judge for the maximum allowed sentence. It wasn't done because D'Souza broke the law, but because he had attacked the President in his books and movie.

As a side note, AUSAs have far more potential cases than resources to pursue them. Under normal circumstance, they perform some sort of cost/benefit analysis. So, in one district (CO), the standard non-political case needed at least two years of prison, under Federal Sentencing Guidelines, to be pursued. Under such, the Guidelines apparently called for probation, given the low amount and it being a first offense, etc.

Which gets us into the adage that a good prosecutor can indict a ham sandwich, and that we all commit felonies every day. Which turns our judicial system from being one of laws, to being one of people, giving prosecutors significant discretion to indict and try whomever they want, esp if their targets are not protected by attorneys and a lot of money (which D'Souza didn't have).

Todd said...

Nyamujal said...
@Angel-Dyne
"Lol^2. The spluttering self-righteousness, the meandering effusions of random talking points (not apropos of anything), the mindless attribution (projection, rather) of true-believing onto interlocutors who have never evinced any such tendency - well, it's all about par for mid-wits of your age. But the pomposity is precocious and well above the average."

Clearly I'm mistaken. Could you talk about the aspects of Trumpism you think will help pompous young jackasses like myself? Any policies you see beneficial to the country in the long run?

3/14/17, 2:48 PM


Well most people will be helped by a reduction in the regulation burden on citizens and businesses. A reduction in the size and over all scope of the federal Government is also a good idea. Any tax reductions will help. Any cuts to Government spending will help. The EO saying that for any new regulation, [at least] one older regulation must be removed will help. Getting conservative judges onto the SC will help enhance individual liberty which is always a good thing. That should do for a start, yes?

Jupiter said...

Blogger Nyamujal said...

"Could you talk about the aspects of Trumpism you think will help pompous young jackasses like myself? Any policies you see beneficial to the country in the long run?"

Interesting you bring that up. I'm sort of hoping that Trump will institute policies that give pompous young jackasses like yourself a very rough ride indeed. Anything that keeps a highly-trained policy engineer like yourself away from the levers of power can hardly fail to benefit the country. Maybe he'll close down the NGO you're planning to work for? Defund the pointless "research" you were planning to get paid for bungling? Hard to say, without knowing what swindle you were hoping would keep you in iPhones and designer coffee without having to work for a living.

Nyamujal said...

@Jupiter
"Interesting you bring that up. I'm sort of hoping that Trump will institute policies that give pompous young jackasses like yourself a very rough ride indeed. Anything that keeps a highly-trained policy engineer like yourself away from the levers of power can hardly fail to benefit the country. Maybe he'll close down the NGO you're planning to work for? Defund the pointless "research" you were planning to get paid for bungling? Hard to say, without knowing what swindle you were hoping would keep you in iPhones and designer coffee without having to work for a living."

I don't work for an NGO or do pointless "research" (at least I hope so). The company I work for is a commercial firm that has hands in sectors ranging from telecommunications to aerospace and defense. We do a lot of business with partners in Europe and Asia-Pacific. The last thing me and thousands of other blue and white collar employees want is punitive tariffs or a trade war with China. BTW, I know people who've worked on parts for the iPhone. If you knew anything about the global supply chain that keeps a lot of Apple suppliers in business, you'd be praying for Trump to be more measured with his anti-trade rhetoric. But hey, what do I know...

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "Variance band! Oh my, I'll see myself out. You're clearly a climate science expert"

Egads.

Note to self: Do not use any language that can be remotely tied to mathematics, engineering, sciences, etc. Nyamujal takes them all to be personal affronts.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "The last thing me and thousands of other blue and white collar employees want is punitive tariffs or a trade war with China."

The last thing anyone wants is a trade war.

However, if a trading partner nation is manipulating it's currency, not allowing for fair trade reciprocity, amongst other things...well. Then we have a problem.

Jupiter said...

Nyamujal said...

"BTW, I know people who've worked on parts for the iPhone. If you knew anything about the global supply chain that keeps a lot of Apple suppliers in business, you'd be praying for Trump to be more measured with his anti-trade rhetoric. But hey, what do I know..."

You lost me, Muj. Why would an in-depth knowledge of how Apple offshores manufacturing jobs make me fonder of the Chi-Coms? And who would I be praying to? And what time zone are you in? Does this aerospace defense firm you work for know that the reason you are musing thoughtfully over your keyboard is that you are arguing on the internet with some opinionated old bastard in the US?

Nyamujal said...

@Jupiter
While we're on the subject of iPhones, look inside any iPhone and you'll find:
MEMS - Probably made by Analog Devices headquartered in MA, but with design and manufacturing centers everywhere.
Microcontrollers and chips from NXP which is headquartered in Holland but has design centers in the US and elsewhere.
Qualcomm - which owns NXP and is headquartered in San Diego. A multinational firm that employs thousands.
AKM chips which is a Japanese company but which designs its chips using ST which is a major European fab with locations in Italy.
Radio components which could again come from companies that design it in the US and fabricate them in Taiwan.
And that's just some of the hardware and not the software and all the apps created by other companies and engineers from around the world.
The final assembly is at Foxconn in China, and for some weird reason (ask the economists), the entire cost of the iPhone counts towards China and USA's trade account deficit.
It's clear that not just Apple, but a lot of US companies and thousands of jobs which are a part of this massive supply and engineering endeavor- a marvel in itself- depend on that one little device. This is but one tiny example of what we're dealing with here. But hey, let's burn everything down because you're pissed...

FullMoon said...

Nyamujal said...

. The last thing me and thousands of other blue and white collar employees want is punitive tariffs or a trade war with China. BTW, I know people who've worked on parts for the iPhone. If you knew anything about the global supply chain that keeps a lot of Apple suppliers in business, you'd be praying for Trump to be more measured with his anti-trade rhetoric. But hey, what do I know...


You are an educated engineer making big bucks and afraid of losing your job? Of going broke because of Trump? Is that it? No thought whatsoever to the millions of less educated or less intelligent people who would like to have a job making just enough money to start a family, buy a small house. Nope, all about you and your pals.

Nyamujal said...

"Does this aerospace defense firm you work for know that the reason you are musing thoughtfully over your keyboard is that you are arguing on the internet with some opinionated old bastard in the US?"

I have the day off, so I can do what I please with my time. Arguing with opinionated old bastards on the internet is something I like doing :-) My wife is getting increasingly pissed though. I better go help her.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "My wife is getting increasingly pissed though. I better go help her"

At long last, agreement. And in a good way.

Jupiter said...

Nyamujal said...

"It's clear that not just Apple, but a lot of US companies and thousands of jobs which are a part of this massive supply and engineering endeavor- a marvel in itself- depend on that one little device. This is but one tiny example of what we're dealing with here."

Yeah, you're right, it is. We're dealing with a complex network of immense corporations with no allegiance to the nations they parasitize. You say that like it's a good thing.

Peter Irons said...



Bharara is a creature of Chuck Schumer. He was Schumer's counsel and then Schumer nominated him for U.S. Attorney. Schumer has his nose so far up Wall Street's a&& in pursuit of campaign contributions that he can hardly breathe.

So: Schumer uses Wall Street to raise money. Bharara polices Wall Street.

How do you suppose that works out?

And why do you suppose this has not been more widely reported?

Bharara's corruption runs deep--it is the sleeze of the crony, who uses the power and connections of public office to feather his own nest and further his own career.

Nyamujal said...

@FullMoon
"You are an educated engineer making big bucks and afraid of losing your job? Of going broke because of Trump? Is that it? No thought whatsoever to the millions of less educated or less intelligent people who would like to have a job making just enough money to start a family, buy a small house. Nope, all about you and your pals."

It might come as a surprise, but my wife and I feel just as squeezed despite doing reasonably well. I can only imagine how precarious things are for people in lower income percentiles...I honestly don't see anything Trump's doing helping me or my friends. Maybe the tax cuts. But that'll mostly help people in higher income percentiles (>95). The child tax deductions won't help either as we won't have enough to deduct if we continue renting. Childcare is expensive, schooling's expensive, housing's getting unaffordable in parts of the country with a concentration of good jobs, and things are only going to get worse once I start planning on saving for my future kid's college which is outpacing inflation at a crazy rate.

OLDFART said...

Finally I can agree with Ann on something!

FullMoon said...

Nayamujal:
....I can only imagine how precarious things are for people in lower income percentiles..


Not sure you can. You are on your way up. Educated two income family. No college debt. Many people are not college worthy or able to afford higher education. Many middle class and lower middle class have lost jobs, homes, and families. Your future is bright, Trump or no Trump.

Nyamujal said...

@FullMoon
"Not sure you can. You are on your way up. Educated two income family. No college debt. Many people are not college worthy or able to afford higher education. Many middle class and lower middle class have lost jobs, homes, and families. Your future is bright, Trump or no Trump."

Perhaps. For the middle class families that have lost houses, I'd be in favor of debt relief. Instead of bailing out a lot of the financial companies during the crisis, we should've used that money towards helping families under water. I really don't mind paying higher taxes as long as I know that some of it is going towards helping those who need assistance in the form of well-designed welfare programs. But again, I don't see Trump's policies helping people in need. Mnuchin's firm OneWest foreclosed on thousands in CA :http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/12/foreclosing-on-a-90-year-old-woman-over-27-cents-steven-mnuchins-days-at-onewest, and now he's treasury secretary. His tax cuts for the rich won't help anyone but his wealthy pals. The GOP healthcare plan is nothing but a massive $600 billion transfer to top income earners.

HT said...

Nyamujal, brilliant. You've got em all beat. Keep it coming!

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "Mnuchin's firm OneWest foreclosed on thousands in CA :http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/12/foreclosing-on-a-90-year-old-woman-over-27-cents-steven-mnuchins-days-at-onewest, and now he's treasury secretary."

Already debunked.

Politico, which first reported on the story, eventually attached a correction, reading:

"CIT Bank, successor to OneWest after a 2015 merger, was the entity that filed foreclosure proceedings against Ossie Lofton over a 27-cent payment error. The story has also been revised to clarify that there were two separate foreclosure proceedings against Lofton. At the time the second foreclosure was filed in 2016, Mnuchin had sold his stake in OneWest and was on the board of CIT."

You should probably up your "standard lefty Fake News" capabilities.

Or just go all the way and convert to "lifelong republican". There are some who believe that is a better way to go.

Drago said...

HT: "Nyamujal, brilliant. You've got em all beat. Keep it coming!"

It's easy to "beat" others when you get to make up your own reality.

Not surprising that HT deems that a "brilliant" strategy.

Drago said...

And by the way, the 97 year old woman never actually had her home foreclosed on.

Lets face it, had it not been for Climate Change, this never would have happened at all.

Drago said...

Of course, the real reason the woman was never evicted is because Putin did not want her to be.

Danno said...

Peter Irons said..."Schumer has his nose so far up Wall Street's a&& in pursuit of campaign contributions that he can hardly breathe."

Considering this, I wonder why his glasses are always hanging on the tip of his nose.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
Oops, you're right. The story you're talking about is indeed false and has been rightly discredited. My bad.
There isn't a correction on the other stories listed though, nor is there a retraction of the fact that under Mnuchin, OneWest was a foreclosure machine.
Are you missing the forest for the trees on purpose?

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"However, if a trading partner nation is manipulating it's currency, not allowing for fair trade reciprocity, amongst other things...well. Then we have a problem."

That hasn't happened in years. Ever since China loosened its capital controls money has been flowing freely out of China. Some of that is going into real estate investments on the East and West Coast and into US equities because the US is still considered a stable long term investment bet (Hope Trump doesn't fuck that up..). China is now actually propping up the Yuan to prevent some of those capital outflows. If they actually let it assume it's natural rate, their exports will get even cheaper! Do you want that?

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "Mnuchin, OneWest was a foreclosure machine. Are you missing the forest for the trees on purpose?"

Simple parroting of leftwing talking points is not very becoming.

Mnuchins investment team purchased the failed IndyMac company which "owned" all of those failed loans.

During that time where tens of thousands of failed loans run up by IndyMac had to be dealt with Mnuchins company also extended terms and modifications to over 100,000 other borrowers.

So there you go.

Given your lack of any understanding of the details of these arrangements or business realities, I doubt seriously if you could even run a Dunkin Doughnuts.



Drago said...

BTW, do you know why Dunkin Doughnuts are so good?

Climate Change.

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "@Drago Oops, you're right. The story you're talking about is indeed false and has been rightly discredited."

Since when did a story becoming "discredited" keep the lefties from spreading it far and wide?

Never. It's still being parroted today.

Nyamujal said...

@Drago
"Mnuchins investment team purchased the failed IndyMac company which "owned" all of those failed loans."

Again, missing the forest for the trees. This is a version of the old Trump argument "I can fix things because I've exploited these loopholes before". You're fine with the foxes running the henhouse. The original comment pointed out that Trump never really had the interests of the working class in mind, as evidenced by his cabinet appointments, including Mnuchin. Some examples:
1. Trump attacked his opponents for their ties to Goldman Sachs and put them at the forefront of a globalist cabal bent on screwing working class Americans.
After the election he stacked his cabinet with current or ex GS people.
2. Trump promised that the Republican plan would cover more people, reduce their premiums and costs, avoid cutting Medicaid, and leave no one worse off than under the former president's signature achievement.
That's clearly not the case now.
3. During the election Trump decried pay for play politics.
After the election he placed six of his top donors on his cabinet.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/12/09/the-six-donors-trump-appointed-to-his-administration-gave-almost-12-million-with-their-families-to-his-campaign-and-the-party/?utm_term=.c521c94f7955

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Nyamujal said...

"BTW, do you know why Dunkin Doughnuts are so good?"

It's donuts BTW. They're actually not that good. There are plenty of better donut joints in the area. New Englanders seem to love their milky, sugary coffee though. Their love of DD is a mystery to me, like the blind Trump love displayed in the comment section here.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Drago said...
Nyamujal: "The ProPublica link has profiles of other staff members who I still maintain I wouldn't trust to run my local Dunkin."

No one cares who you would trust to run anything.

In fact, your opposition is likely prima facie evidence that someone should be trusted to run something.
3/14/17, 1:39 PM

No, actually, Joe Biden would say that Nyamujal is just the guy to opine on Dunkin Donuts.

How old were you again, Nyah? Are you a US citizen, or do you have a Green Card or what? Or are you an h1b taking our jerbs?

Bad Lieutenant said...

I will agree with you that Dunkin' Donuts ain't all that. Much much much prefer Krispy Kreme. Or for that matter the push carts. Best cinnamon rolls are on push carts.

Nyamujal said...

"How old were you again, Nyah? Are you a US citizen, or do you have a Green Card or what? Or are you an h1b taking our jerbs?"

Are you really a Bad Lieutenant or do you just play one on the internet?

Nyamujal said...

@Bad Lieutenant
Haha: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_kC_bP28iQ

Drago said...

Nyamujal: "It's donuts BTW"

I go with Krispy Kreme's spelling.

Because duh.

FullMoon said...

Nyamujal said...


The original comment pointed out that Trump never really had the interests of the working class in mind, as evidenced by his cabinet appointments, including Mnuchin. Some examples:
1. Trump attacked his opponents for their ties to Goldman Sachs and put them at the forefront of a globalist cabal bent on screwing working class Americans.
After the election he stacked his cabinet with current or ex GS people.
2. Trump promised that the Republican plan would cover more people, reduce their premiums and costs, avoid cutting Medicaid, and leave no one worse off than under the former president's signature achievement.
That's clearly not the case now.
3. During the election Trump decried pay for play politics.
After the election he placed six of his top donors on his cabinet.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/12/09/the-six-donors-trump-appointed-to-his-administration-gave-almost-12-million-with-their-families-to-his-campaign-and-the-party/?utm_term=.c521c94f7955


DeVos for school choice, companies investing in USA already happening in real world. Otherworldly, bad things might happen sometime in future.
Anything President Trump has actually done yet to destroy middle class/poor? One real example?

The Cracker Emcee said...

"But hey, let's burn everything down because you're pissed..."

Or alternatively, let's provide the incentives that wifi make it possible to produce that stuff in the US.

Rusty said...

"3. During the election Trump decried pay for play politics.
After the election he placed six of his top donors on his cabinet."

You have a fundamental misunderstanding of what," pay for play" means.