January 13, 2017

"How to Live in a 150-Square-Foot Studio."

Nicely designed. Look at the slideshow. The minimization of the kitchen area is brilliant.

40 comments:

MayBee said...

I like that they left his stuff on the floor for some of the pictures. That's real life.

Ann Althouse said...

Stuff on the floor is only in the before pictures.

MayBee said...

Oh ha! I didn't read the captions. I thought they were all just pictures. But you know the clothes are going back on the floor.

SayAahh said...

"The miniaturization of the kitchen area is brilliant".... if you don't like to eat.

Hamsters live in tiny "efficient" spaces as well.

William said...

If you're young and active and mostly use your apartment for sleeping, it's doable. Otherwise there are better ways to save money. If you practice home dentistry, you can save a fortune and it's only slightly more uncomfortable.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

How to Live in a 150-Square-Foot Studio.

1) Enter a 150-Square-Foot studio.
2) Stay a while.

Was that so hard?

rehajm said...

That one's not bad. Some of them are more like kid forts than livable spaces.

The worst ones have combo kitchen-toilet arrangements.

Robert Cook said...

He says it "wasn't a scam." I defer agreement on that until I learn how much he pays in rent.

bagoh20 said...

I'm going the opposite way. I just bought a house in Las Vegas that is twice the size of my one in L.A., on over an acre of land (8 times the area), half the age, all remodeled and modern for half of what the L.A. place cost. That's how you save money. Saving does not have to mean sacrifice unless escaping from insane traffic and human casserole is a sacrifice. That tiny thing is certainly no sanctuary from the crowding outside in the city, but rather further insult.

mockturtle said...

I'm not impressed. The average RV has a better designed and more comfortable interior in even less space. And it moves!

Ignorance is Bliss said...

This looks like an ideal living arrangement for that ~15 year period between college and adulthood.

traditionalguy said...

It looks like a Pullman Car. Does it have wheels and a train coupler.

Expat(ish) said...

@bagoh20 -> Also the property taxes are probably 1/4th what they were in CA. Also considering the state tax rate, plus gas taxes, ......

When I moved to FL from a reasonably low tax state i was shocked - no 5% state tax, property taxes 40% lower, food cheaper, ....

-XC

PS - You are living in a desert and will die of thirst, but that's a future-you problem. :-)

Anglelyne said...

I got an attack of claustrophobia just looking at the pictures.

I hope that window opens onto something other than a wall.

Shudder.

TWW said...

The original kitchen had a stove top and (probably) a conventional oven. The new, only microwave. The Dude could not abide.

Anglelyne said...

Expat(ish) to bagoh: When I moved to FL from a reasonably low tax state i was shocked - no 5% state tax, property taxes 40% lower, food cheaper, ....

-XC

PS - You are living in a desert and will die of thirst, but that's a future-you problem. :-)


I think that every time I drive through the Las Vegas area.

On the other hand, the impression I get from visits to Florida is that you will meet your end at the hands of brain-eating zombies.

Robert Cook said...

@bagoh20:

But, you have to live in Las Vegas.

Danno said...

A microwave and a dorm fridge. Not exactly my idea of a kitchen, and I am not that much of a cook.

Mark said...

A lot of people have learned how to live for decades in spaces that small -- smaller even. They are called "prisoners."

FullMoon said...

Lived in a smaller space when first left home. Impala Motel, two rooms-front seat and back seat. Radio and heater included.

MadisonMan said...

I agree that it's well-designed. I hope it's air-conditioned.

If you're in a city teeming with people, hemming you in, I guess you get used to it and won't mind being hemmed in when you're in your own place. I would not like having to see the same view, always, in my house. I can change rooms.

Ann Althouse said...

""The miniaturization of the kitchen area is brilliant".... if you don't like to eat."

Living in a small space like that, you would use the kitchen for some of your eating, but rely on restaurants and take out for significant meals. What you see there would work for a type of eating that would get one person through breakfast and snacks. I would find that space livable if I were single and on the assumption that you walk out of it into a vibrant neighborhood full of restaurants and cafes and other spaces that are the extension of your home.

You really don't want a lot of cooking in a small space. The smells and clutter are intrusive. You need to simplify and saying this is a place for coffee, sandwiches and — if it's dinner time — a glass of wine and a plate of cheese and crackers. If you want more, get out of the apartment. You should be getting out a lot anyway.

madAsHell said...

You don't even notice the stoppered water bottle on the wall, and the exercise wheel.

tcrosse said...

You are living in a desert and will die of thirst, but that's a future-you problem.
If California secedes, there will be that much more Colorado River water for Nevada and Arizona.

JAORE said...

Great idea. Move some more people into these sarcophagus apartments. Feel free. I'll just push back my overstuffed recliner here in Alabamistan.

Michael said...

Althouse is enthralled with the small house movement, with tiny living spaces. Now retired she and Meade should investigate an investment in a Sprint fitted out as an RV. Much larger than the stupid tiny NY dwelling and mobile to boot. So you can let what happens in Las Vegas stay in Las Vegas

Larry J said...

mockturtle said...
I'm not impressed. The average RV has a better designed and more comfortable interior in even less space. And it moves!


I lived in a camper for 9 months when I got out of the Air Force and went to college. That was in 1982. The camper was 23 feet long but that probably included the hitch and rear bumper. In terms of real space, it was probably the size of this studio apartment but it had a permanent full size bed, a dinette for eating and studying, a three burner stovetop and small oven, refrigerator, and a small bathroom. I had a bookshelf and suspended a small TV from some cabinets. The thing had a lot of storage, more than I really needed. It worked well for me and was very economical. When I got engaged, I sold the trailer and bought something bigger. There is such a thing as too much togetherness even for newlyweds.

Rance Fasoldt said...

Ingenious and inviting. I had a similar spot (in size, not charm) near Penn Station about 25 years ago - $250/mo. Had it looked like this, I might have stayed more than the night or two that I stayed in the City for work, rather than take the train home to the Main Line in Philadelphia.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

I did a bunch of research a few months ago about doing van conversions (to campers and/or stealth campers) and if you like this layout you'd love some of those designs, Professor.

I'm not overly impressed w/his kitchen, really: it seems like most of the space savings he got was just by removing the oven/stove. I only see a microwave for cooking--he needs either a high end toaster oven or something like a Thermomix. I don't see any storage for hanging clothes, but maybe that's near or in the bathroom that's also not shown. He seems to have a lot of sneakers for someone living in tight quarters, but maybe that's just me. Anyway, if he's happy, good for him (I do wonder what it costs, though).

bagoh20 said...

But, you have to live in Las Vegas."

After 35 years in L.A., I love Las Vegas. Unlike L.A., everything there is new, uncrowded, easy to get to on nice smooth roads, with quiet neighborhoods, and lots of parking wherever you go. It's just easy living by comparison to the rat race here.

I'm also moving my entire company, including as many of my 90 employees as I can convince to go. Upon crossing the border to Nevada they will instantly move up in class and lifestyle with housing they can afford to buy in decent neighborhoods. L.A. has become unlivable for anyone but the rich.

On the business side, California has lost its soul to corruption and leftism enshrined in law. Electricity is triple the cost, and workers comp insurance double, not to mention the highest taxes in the nation with my top income tax rate at over 13% versus Nevada at 0. It's a no-brainer that took me too long to come to. I've already lost millions I can never get back, and so have my people. We will be robbed no more.

mockturtle said...

While I'm not fond of Las Vegas, Nevada sure beats the hell out of California.

art.the.nerd said...

I retired from Orange County (south of Los Angeles) to Las Vegas 18 months ago. I agree with bagoh20. So far I haven't been able to persuade any of my friends from The OC to move here, but they sure do like coming to visit.

tcrosse said...

There are parts of Las Vegas that the tourists never see. We'd like to keep it that way.

Ann Althouse said...

"Althouse is enthralled with the small house movement, with tiny living spaces. Now retired she and Meade should investigate an investment in a Sprint fitted out as an RV. Much larger than the stupid tiny NY dwelling and mobile to boot. So you can let what happens in Las Vegas stay in Las Vegas."

No, I am not willing to sleep in an enclosed space where the toilet isn't connected to a sewer system. I want real running water. That's just crucial to me.

Ann Althouse said...

I'd never heard of a Sprint until I met Meade.

We did look at one. But I would never be willing to drive it. And when I look at how they are fitted out... nothing works for me. I have never seen an interior that didn't annoy me for many different reasons.

How do you ventilate a thing like that? How can you sleep without a problem with the temperature or the noise?

I don't want a kitchen in such close proximity to the sleeping area. It's just maddening!

mockturtle said...

Do you mean a Sprinter?

Meade said...

Yes.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

How do you ventilate?

With a product called a FantasticFan! Oh the links I could send! Check out the Reddit forum VanDwellers and search the tags for projects and conversions -- people do some impressive work.
Half the fun seems to be in designing and building the conversion yourself. If you don't want to do that yourself there are several good companies making Class Bs and you can find 'em just a few years old, used, for serious discounts.
As for driveability everything I've read says the 144" wheelbase model drives like a (tall) car. It is about the same length as a supercab truck! Most if the serious conversions go with the high roof and that limits you a bit (drive thrus, bank lines, etc) but otherwise no problem, especially w/added cameras. Most of the conversions w/full bathrooms are the 170" models, though. Also the cartridge-style toilets probably solve your plumbing problems.
Sorry, it really was something I researched last year!

mockturtle said...

I prefer a hard-top [raised] to pop-up, partly because I do a lot of camping in bear country.

Leora said...

I don't think I could live without something to cook on. Maybe there's a burner in one of the bins?