October 26, 2016

"A Young Athlete Who Uses Vigorol."



An ad from 1901, when beef tea "fortified health and cured a host of physical concerns."

And in the summer... iced beef tea:

24 comments:

MadisonMan said...

How does Beef Tea differ from Beef Broth?

traditionalguy said...

The Hindus are going to be very angry. Eat Mor Chikin.

traditionalguy said...

Viagarol is today's four hour tea, but it makes the hot water blue.

Original Mike said...

Guinness is good for you.

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

I think it was the Three Stooges who made chicken soup by pouring a kettle of boiling water through a dressed chicken.

buwaya said...

That would make a good ad for illegal anabolic steroids.

coupe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
lemondog said...

Same guy?

AD LOT OF 6 1898 ADS VIGORAL ARMOUR CO WEIGHTLIFTER JOSEPH KOHEN ALLEGHENY

1865 NYT article making therapeutic beef tea is vastly wasteful and suggests use of therapeutic wine Beef Tea

Earnest Prole said...

Bodies

just

seemed

healthier

back then

Sigivald said...

I would drink that.

Char Char Binks said...

What a FINE ANIMAL MAN!

David Begley said...

Next new thing at Starbucks.

HoodlumDoodlum said...

Isn't "bone broth" a big deal now? As a health food for smart elites, I mean.
One wonders how different Beef Tea is from bone broth.

(I tried some Armour Dried Beef last week--the jars were on sale at the supermarket and I've been testing out camping/preserved foods--and BOY was that a strong flavor! I popped a few slices into my mouth and was overwhelmed. I then read the back of the jar and apparently if you're eating them straight you're supposed to rinse the slices off (they're super-salty). So, you know, I learned my lesson. Beefy, at any rate.)

buwaya said...

E. Prole,

They just liked them fertile-looking, with the hips to deliver strong sons.

Bob said...

I prefer Vita-Meata-Vegamin.

madAsHell said...

Iced Beef Tea??
No, lemonade.

Iced Beef Tea?
No, lemonade!
Can't you read the damn sign?
Le-MON-ade!

damikesc said...

Beef Tea sounds like, quite possibly, the most disgusting thing in history. I can imagine slicing a cow up and fixing it into a teabag.

That would make a good ad for illegal anabolic steroids.

I'd say "Everybody uses HGH and nobody uses steroids anymore", then I think for a moment and realize "Hey, they use BOTH". Also sad to think it takes, I think, a six times normal testosterone levels to fail a drug test.

FullMoon said...

Read that first Olympic drug disqualification was for taking strychnine. A weightlifter at last Olympics was disqualified for same reason.

wholelottasplainin' said...

Who could ever forget "Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound", a tonic to address "Female Complaints"?

Earnest Prole said...

buwaya,

the bone is for the dog; the meat is for the man

MaxedOutMama said...

Basically vitamin B.

Hammond X. Gritzkofe said...

We look for those places that advertise "Juciest Burgers In Town" and always order a glass of fresh hot hamburger juice. Super-size!

Fritz said...

Also sad to think it takes, I think, a six times normal testosterone levels to fail a drug test.

The normal range of testosterone levels in healthy adult males is between 280 to 1,100 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL), reports the University of Rochester Medical Center.

That's quite a range, and I expect successful athletes tend to lie on the high side. So it takes a pretty large deviation to be outside the "normal range" to be sure someone is cheating.

chickelit said...

@Althouse: I believe the advert actually says "Vigoral" not "Vigorol." For the record, please take a closer look.

Outside of chemistry, the suffix "al" converts a noun to an adjective. There are thousand of examples. I think Vigoral is one of them, albeit contrived.

The suffix "ol" sounds medicinal - cf. geritol, pepto bismol, fukitol, etc. Maybe that's why you wrote Vigorol.

In chemistry -- as you probably recall -- "al" and "ol"have strictly-defined meanings which we need not go into here.