September 21, 2016

"Daniel Arsham favored grey for most of his career. But last week, he unveiled his first exhibition in full color."

"The inspiration behind this pivot of palette? A pair of EnChroma glasses, which revealed thousands of new tones to the colorblind artist."

14 comments:

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Really cool that they can correct his color blindness.

Shame he sucks as an artist.

And those are basketballs? Really?

Jeffrey said...

Clip-clip.

Finished.

Jeez, I really am a writer.

Now pay me.

Bob Ellison said...

Extreme Adblock resistance on Forbes.com, and the general low quality and wild swings of the writing there, make me not bother with the link.

Curious George said...

"Ignorance is Bliss said...

And those are basketballs? Really?"

No. I see volleyballs. And a soccer ball. There may be one in there but I see no basketballs.

Clyde said...

Out of curiosity, Althouse, if a company offered something similar for anosmia, would you try it?

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Curious George said...

No. I see volleyballs. And a soccer ball. There may be one in there but I see no basketballs.

And apparently not even real ones, but nerf ones, or some other solid foam rubber variety.

JAORE said...

I discovered I was partially color blind when I used a GM color spray paint after bondo work on my first car. I thought I'd done a fantastic job.... indistinguishable from the other fender. Until my girl friend said, "Why did you paint your fender sky blue on an aqua car?"

I'd try a pair.

Ann Althouse said...

"Out of curiosity, Althouse, if a company offered something similar for anosmia, would you try it?"

Something like glasses for the nose?

I'm trying to picture it.

If it's something like a drug, then no.

Gabriel said...

Color-blind people see colors. They don't see the same colors as everyone else. His color-blindness does not explain why he worked in grey tones before. As he says in the article, the change has more to do with the materials he uses now.

Color-blindness and anosmia are not analogous. If anosmia were like color-blindness, people who had it would still smell but confuse smells that others think cannot be confused.

Michael said...

What that guy assembles is not art.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

Extreme Adblock resistance on Forbes.com, Ditto. I won't undo my adblock for Forbes.

I would have like to see that article though because my mother was colorblind. She didn't know it until she was a teenager when someone asked to borrow her blue dress and she said she didn't have a blue dress, that it was brown. Blue/green/brown all the same. Red/green the same. Big problem when it came to traffic lights. Pastel colors...forget it.

My brother is also (of course) color blind.

I've always wondered what the world looks like to them.

Howard said...

Color-blindness is not a disability. It is a feature, a gift from Gaia for being a partial neanderthal male,like dyslexia and ADHD. If these features were disabilities, they would be rare, however, the tribe needs impatient assholes who solve problems instantly using multi-dimensional pictographs and have the ability to see well at night and spot camouflage.

The wifey got me the Enchroma glasses a couple years ago. Those pair only worked for a couple months. They ended up having a recall and I got a "free" new pair a year ago and they still work. Most of my colorblind friends have no desire to wear them. One issue is they don't work for everyone, another is that they can make you disorientated from sensory overload. The biggest reason is that we don't need them because we rely on value contrast, shapes, textures and movement and don't become distracted by bright colors.

Howard said...

I explained it to my Grandaughter last week. On an extra clear day with dry air, colors pop and on a cloudy day, colors are muted. My guess is that what I see on a super clear, sharp day with my Enchroma glasses is what you people see on a cloudy day.

The pictures at the link all look the same to me

Van Gogh Colorblind

Bad Lieutenant said...

Ann Althouse said...
"Out of curiosity, Althouse, if a company offered something similar for anosmia, would you try it?"

Something like glasses for the nose?

I'm trying to picture it.

If it's something like a drug, then no.

9/21/16, 8:19 AM


Maybe something electrostim.

But if you wouldn't take medicine ("a drug?") to cure your condition, it must not be a big deal to you.