August 29, 2016

At the Cleome Café...

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... you can talk about whatever you want.

(The photo is by Meade, taken just a short while ago, as twilight fell.)

20 comments:

Ann Althouse said...

Meade prompts me to notice the flag.

mockturtle said...

Are those peonies?

Ann Althouse said...

They are cleome.

YoungHegelian said...

Saturday night at a yuuuuuuuuuge Chinese restaurant in Rockville, MD saw a Cambodian wedding dinner for 350 people! The bride wore gold, unlike the traditional Chinese weddings I've seen there where the bride wears red.

And the dressed to the nines young Cambodian women coming in.... Major occasion of sin, dude. Major occasion of sin!

tim in vermont said...

I got such a kick out of the huge moths in the flowers at night, then it turns out they were laying eggs on my tomato plant and producing Tomato Horn Worm caterpillars as big as one of Tony Robins' fingers. They were stripping my tomato plants and eating the tomatoes to boot!

mockturtle said...

They are cleome.

I guess it's a little late for peonies. ;-)

MadisonMan said...

Cleome, the plant that never leaves. What a re-seeder!!

Bob Ellison said...

Trump should have picked Ben Folds as VP. The Trump-Folds ticket could've beaten Jobnson-Weld.

tim in vermont said...

"Re-seed-ivists"

traditionalguy said...
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traditionalguy said...

Amazed at how much in depth history is now available on once secret WWII events. FDR was a truly amazing leader of the Allies.

I am enjoying Nigel Hamilton's new Audiobook called Commander in Chief which detail the 1943 events between Churchill aiming at protecting the British Empire and FDR's superb leadership that struggled with him for a different outcome.

Which reminds me of what a taciturn old North Carolina Civil Rights leader who worked under MLK said about why he supports Trump. He said. " Politicians are a dime a dozen, but a finding a leader is extremely valuable."

David said...

WIKIPEDIA:

"Cleome is a genus of flowering plants in the family Cleomaceae. Previously it had been placed in the family Capparaceae, until DNA studies found the Cleomaceae genera to be more closely related to the Brassicaceae than the Capparaceae. The APG II system[1] allows for Cleome and the other members of the Cleomaceae to be included in the Brassicaceae.

The genus sensu stricto includes about 170 species of herbaceous annual or perennial plants and shrubs.[2] The genus has a subcosmopolitan distribution throughout the tropical and warm temperate regions of the world.[2] However, a recent DNA study failed to separate Cleome, Podandrogyne, and Polanisia from each other, so some taxonomists have abandoned the last two of these genera, treating them as part of Cleome sensu lato; in this case, Cleome contains about 275 species, the vast majority of the Cleomaceae."

There is a foundational knowledge necessary to understand all technical descriptions. It seems mine is lacking in this category.

They are very pretty though. How do I get some good examples to plant next year?

Dave Duffy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rehajm said...

Obamacare is still failing while Obama still lies about it. Hillary planning on what to make of the ruins. At least she recognizes the problem.

Thank heavrns we invested so much time and money and political capital in Obamas defining legislation.

rhhardin said...

Pitcairn Island has a ham expedition every morning recently, very weak which means that he couldn't possible hear me with 5w, and also there's a hundred people calling him, causing a bird flock noise on the low end of the band. Mostly he talks to Japanese.

Around 6:30 eastern time there's an open propagation path to Australia on 40m, that I check to see if anybody's loud enough to try reaching. Australia isn't so rare than there's much competition.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Rh, do what pleases you, but very few here know much or anything about ham radio so you're talking over most people's heads. In case you did not know.

Tradguy, your 8/29/16, 9:14 PM is to weep. Oh, that's nice, FDR stripped power from the UK as he SHOVELED IT AT THE USSR! Decolonization has had few positive impacts that you can name and the failures fill the headlines. Between Stalin and Napoleon, you've got some strange choices in hero worship.

If Trump loses, I will have only one consolation, that you will be choking on it; and the truth is, you probably don't really care, you're just operating your fool tongue. Maybe you'll perceive a good bet soon and change horses and start tonguing Chuck's pal "Mrs Clinton." Actually I wish you would because it is extremely concerning to be on the same side as you.

wildswan said...

David - This may be a bit of a foundational knowledge assist:

In the old days decisions on plant family, genus and species were based on morphological characters such as How many stamens and pistils. These categories are undergoing revisions based on DNA studies and the new system is called "the APG II" e.g."The APG II system allows for Cleome and the other members of the Cleomaceae to be included in the Brassicaceae." These changes are huge to botanists and are happening as we speak. Borders are being altered.

Overall the changes are interesting because they paint a picture of evolution - the Cleomes altered into their specific shape from a Brassicaceae norm, not a Capparaceae norm - and so on a worldwide all-plant scale we will ultimately get a very detailed picture of the travels of the flowers like the geographical maps showing the travels of the different human groups such as the Polynesians. But we aren't there yet. Statements like "The APG II system allows for Cleome and the other members of the Cleomaceae to be included in the Brassicaceae." feel more like "bridge closed - cross somewhere else - ask at a gas station where" than information of any kind. This is because the DNA characters that lead to changes in evolutionary maps (systematics changes) are often not visible as morphological characteristics such as shape of the flower.

So Wikipedia articles on plants are rather bog-you-down-in-detail these days but something interesting is coming down the road. If you just skip the bits about APG in Wikipedia it is OK on flowers. But I suggest alt-search: "flower X how to grow and "flower X originate" or else "Cleome" + Google image search", pick the prettiest flower picture and read that person's blog because that person will be an enthusiast.

David said...

Thanks Wildswan. Comments like that help to make Althouse Blog great.

mockturtle said...

Regarding cleome, Ann. Honestly, I'd never heard of it [maybe not grown in the PNW] and now seeing that is the headline for the post--duh!--.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Wow, science. I thought the cleome was just bred to provide a (sketchy) rhyme for the peony!