June 22, 2016

2 views of the poppy.

By me, with the point-and-shoot:

P1150415

By Meade, with the Nikon SLR with the Micro-NIKKOR 105mm lens:

Poppy

27 comments:

StephenFearby said...

Ann Althouse wrote:

"By me, with the point-and-shoot:"

Evidently some kind of semi-automatic assault camera...with multiple SD cards in a banana-clip magazine.

Fred Drinkwater said...

Stephen: Ha! One does occasionally hear reference to the revolver pistol design as "the original point-and-shoot interface".
But Althouse is no doubt equipped with a full-auto device on her phone, and Meade's Nikon can probably get off 5 shots per second. If he's got a pistol grip for the thing, I'm certain it falls under the Wisconsin "assault" definition.

Lucien said...

I think the crossbow was point and shoot before the revolver.

pm317 said...

ha.. what color is that flower?

khesanh0802 said...

Meade; You should have cropped tighter and your flower is out of focus when you blow it up You should use a tri-pod and trigger extension when you are taking flower pictures. You should also check your depth of field gizmo before you trip the shutter to be sure you have what you want in focus. You can see that the flowers below the magenta one are in perfect focus because either your focus or depth of field (f stop) or both was off.

khesanh0802 said...

Ann; Sorry, my comments should have gone to you. You came close, but taking that kind of picture with a point and shoot will rarely get you a high quality photo.

Meade: your subject is lost behind all that out of focus foreground. A mistake I have made many times. Still suggest a tri-pod if you want to get the full capabilities from the nice camera and lens.

Carol said...

Hmmm, resembles papaver somniferum..

Meade said...

khesanh0802: I like it that way. :)

chickelit said...

I like the point and shoot better. The hi-tech photo has something blurry in front or else the lens is dirty.

Meade said...

Blurry and dirty is what makes it ART!

Bob said...

"Death, be not proud, though some have call├Ęd thee / Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so... / And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well / And better than thy stroke."

Guildofcannonballs said...

Very mega-intriguing.

I know there is a perverted Michelle Phillps ref. here yes yes, but a quick wiki satisfies not.

Is this Cass intrigue?

Archilochus said...

Lovely photos. They inspired me to listen to Francois Couperin's 27th Ordre, Livre 4, 27
2 - Les Pavots.

Lauderdale Vet said...

I'm squirreling my lunch money away for that lens. All I have now is a D750 with that nice 24-70mm.

I raise butterflies for the garden, and am really looking forward to having that 105mm micro just for that.

Lauderdale Vet said...

Also, I think both photographs are quite nice.

It was the first thing I thought, should have been the first thing I said.

buwaya puti said...

Khesanh,
Thats the difference between technical perfection and art.
The art of the shot is the veiling of the flowers glory, peeping shyly out behind the green cloud of the out of focus foliage. That is art.
Personally, I like shooting flowers backlit by a setting sun, against a dark background so they glow like neon. Thats art too I guess, but not a bit subtle.

tim in vermont said...

It is a masculine vs a feminine view of the same flower. Each taken on its own terms is quite nice.

CStanley said...

The selective plane of focus that you get with an SLR definitely produces a more artistic image. My only critique of Meade's photo is the stem that crosses over the main flower image- too distracting. Other than that it is quite lovely.

tim in vermont said...

I think the stem makes the photo, myself. I am being fully serious here. It puts the flower in a kind of bower.

LCpl Predator said...

Looks like they were taken in an herb garden. I recognize chamomile, and perhaps lemon balm, cilantro, and maybe even some arugula there. In all this craziness going on, it's nice to have something else to look at/talk about. Thanks.

I spent hours these last couple of days, pulling out all the annual poppies that are done blooming. No need letting them all go to seed. I replaced them with left-over basil plant seedlings. It's important to plant for the honey bees, and poppies and basil (really, just about every blooming herb) are some of their favorites. Our neighbor is a beekeeper, and I like to purchase his honey to give as gifts, and tell them that it is a little 'taste' of my garden.

Meade said...

Good eye, LCpl. You got all but lemon balm (which is actually a campanula). I enjoyed your comment about herbs, weeds, seeds, flowers, bees, honey, neighbors, and family. Beautiful.

tim in vermont said...

I spent a couple of hours at a party recently talking to a beekeeper. Those guys and what is flowering by time of year are kind of like the dedicated trout fisherman discussing fly hatches. Both are deeply in touch with the natural world around them.

C Stanley said...

I didn't know that bees like basil! Does it I alert an herbal flavor to their honey? That would be delicious, I think.

@tim - different strokes. I may be too focused on the rules of composition, which of course are sometimes meant to be broken. But I honestly felt that the stem detracted from the overall image.

C Stanley said...

'Alert' should be 'impart'

LCpl Predator said...

C Stanley, I'm not really sure about the honey having a basil flavor. I have a double row, along the edge of my garden, where I plant 11 varieties of basil seedlings. There's lemon, lime, cinnamon, Thai, Magical Michael, Queenette, Floral Spires, Genovese, Opal, Red Rubin, and my new favorite, Tulsi Holy basil. I can't say if the honey that I've purchased was only from the basils. BTW, I cook Fish en Papillote , and the lemon basil on top of the fish is quite tasty.

The Tulsi (Tulsi Gabbard is named after it.) is wonderful in herb tea. When you get a chance, do a little research on it. It's healthy!

The purple basils are used to infuse in vinegar, and it gives it a wonderful flavor and color. I go to estate sales and buy up attractive/antique cruets, and I put the vinegar in there to give as gifts.

I know it's crazy to plant so much basil in the garden, but I like the idea of attracting the bees, and I feel that once the bees are there, they'll pollinate the cukes, tomatoes, etc. as well.

Meade said...

That's my kind of crazy.

LCpl Predator said...

Thanks Meade. Yours and Anne's flower pictures have drawn me out of my lurking mode. Gardening was my passion for years until my age, arthritis, and Lyme's disease affected the number of hours that I could spend out there. I guess, through the years, all that weed pulling has affected my hands. Of course, the knitting may have added to the problem as well.

I was one of the first people in my town of 18,000 to join the newly formed garden club, and around that time, an herb guild was started, and I joined that as well.

I would love if you would have one day a week where we just talked gardening or cooking. I see Ace of Spades does that on Sundays.

While I'm also interested in politics, it's gotten too crazy, and I need a break once in awhile. Oh, and tell Anne that my hubby and his brother enjoyed the Kinks post a couple of weeks ago. They're big time Kinks fans and have attended many of their concerts, and we enjoyed reading the comments as well.

Oh, and campanula? That one doesn't go with the others. It's not edible, is it? They need some lemon balm, but keep tabs on it, as it can be very invasive.