December 27, 2013

"In the US, reality TV is replete with spoiled teenagers, extreme eating challenges, and arguing roommates."

"Here in Kenya, though, an innovative show is putting aside ratings-grabbing petty squabbling and trying to do good: helping small farmers back from the brink of poverty."

6 comments:

Uncle Pavian said...

It's funny how in the US, so many of the people you see on television work for the government.

EDH said...

This is the media narrative flip-side of "American Exceptionalism".

America is exceptionally bad.

And notice the cant:

an innovative show is putting aside ratings-grabbing petty squabbling and trying to do good: helping small farmers back from the brink of poverty.

Now in its fourth season, the show, "Shamba Shape Up,” has become hugely popular in East Africa. Think “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” – but with chicken coops and composting.


It's like they never heard of "This Old House" or, for that matter, "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition".

MadisonMan said...

I like watching Gordon Ramsey in both Hotel Hell and the one where he goes into a restaurant and whips them into shape.

Sad that I can't recall its name!

I learn something from each of those shows, namely (1) Never open a Bed and Breakfast and (2) Don't run a restaurant with your family.

EMD said...

It's like they never heard of "This Old House" or, for that matter, "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition".

Or Duck Dynasty.

ALP said...

Madison Man: "Kitchen Nightmares" is the Gordon Ramsay show you are thinking of. A real eye-opener, its a great way to begin to understand why so many small businesses fail (Hint: the owners don't have a grip on reality and fear math and calculators).

n.n said...

Many Americans are spoiled. Their self-esteem exceeds their achievement. They are Pajama Boys or Girls who are incapable of accepting responsibility for themselves or their actions. Life is good.