November 15, 2013

"That leaves 30 years — 30 years of what? You’re going to knit? That's just crazy!"

Anne-Marie Slaughter is alarmed:

42 comments:

David said...

First you sit.

Then you knit.

She's having a sit-knit-snit.

Gahrie said...

Yeah women have it tough. Luckily men die earlier so they don't have to deal with the problem.

The Godfather said...

Boy! It's a relief that men never have to think about what they're going to do in their golden years.

Gahrie said...

So..can we consider this the first salvo in the Clinton 2016 campaign?

AJ Lynch said...

So this [?] brilliant Ivy League professor expects to live to be 105?

David said...

At first I thought it was about Ana Marie Cox, learning that she too was eventually going to lose her good looks.

Basil said...

These are the people who brought you Obama and Obamacare.

Ann Althouse said...

I thought that was weird. You wind down when you're 70 and that's a problem?

Well, maybe if we are super-healthy.

But who expects to live (with high capacity) over 100?

I do think it's strange to think of retiring at the conventional age of 65. I'll be 65 in a little over 2 years. And I feel the same as I did when I was 35. Why would I just say okay, I'm not working anymore?

But it's not like I wouldn't use my time, like I'd just be at loose ends!

I have plenty to do.

Even if I'd just like to sit around and read and talk to my husband. What's it to you?!! It's my life.

R. Chatt said...

I'm sure since her job is talking she'll be able to continue "working" until she drops.

Irene said...

If she knew anything about knitting, then she'd know it can be complicated. Knitting for four hours--or designing a sweater--can be like solving a theorem.

Irene said...

(I am retired, and I plan to spend my remaining time knitting.)

Michelle Dulak Thomson said...

Ah, the amazing idea that if you aren't getting a paycheck for it, it's not valuable.

I mean, yeesh. My parents have the right idea about retirement. They've both become very accomplished nature photographers. They read voraciously (mostly on Kindle; they've pretty much abjured physical books, which I think is a shame, even though I loves me my Kindle). They have a vast vegetable garden. Mom's with a feral cat rescue and a Doberman pinscher rescue. Oh, and every so often they head off to the Amazon or Antarctica or Costa Rica and photograph. Not a dull life, even if you leave out the two Dobermans and the three parrots and the two cats and all the Gouldian finches.

Henry said...

I could use 30 years right now.

Freeman Hunt said...

She can't think of anything to do unless someone is telling her to do it?

Michelle Dulak Thomson said...

Freeman Hunt,

She can't think of anything to do unless someone is telling her to do it?

Well, apparently. Sad.

Anglelyne said...

To pile on: sheesh, what is it with people who can't imagine not being bored without a "real job"? Broke, hungry, consumed with anxiety about being unemployed, yeah - but bored by not having a job when you don't need one to survive? I've been bored at work, sometimes. (Well, always bored by meetings), I've been bored by social duties, a lot of times. But bored with having time and the luxury of doing whatever the hell I want with it? Does not compute.

St. George said...

Knitting is a form of prayer.

Recently read a book about how different people recovered from severe life traumas. One woman who'd lost a child spent years in misery and could find no relief. Then she took up knitting and found that she could spend hours doing so and finding peace (and healing) in the process.

Gahrie said...

On January 23, 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced the appointment of Slaughter as the new Director of Policy Planning under the Obama administration.[1] Slaughter was the first woman to hold this position.

I'm telling you, this is battlefield prep by the Clintons.

Hagar said...

I your job, or whatever, leaves your hands free, knitting is very soothing, and the less complicated patterns leave your mind free, if you are a multi-tasking woman.

Hagar said...

I your job, or whatever, leaves your hands free, knitting is very soothing, and the less complicated patterns leave your mind free, if you are a multi-tasking woman.

Sam L. said...

There's a lot of knitting to be done. There are other ways of volunteering or even going into business for yourself in very small ways. Though some town will assess a fine for unpaid taxes and no business license (and illegal parking, too).

rhhardin said...

If women could sustain an actual interest in math, they could just keep doing it before and after retirement.

chrisnavin.com said...

Isn't there a government-policy-academe lecture circuit to travel and give speeches like these?

I'm guessing she hits the pantsuit-trail pretty hard.

That's what you should be doing ladies, fighting for the cause.



Paul Zrimsek said...

And from old habit he asked himself the question: "Well, and what next? What am I going to do now?" And he immediately gave himself the answer: "I am going to live. Ah, how splendid!"-- Tolstoy, War and Peace

Gahrie said...

Anyone wanna guess who turns 69 two weeks before the next presidential election?

Anyone?

Aw come one..I know you can hear me......

CWJ said...

WOW!!!

That snotty (but typical) comment pushed all my buttons. I could go on for paragraphs that no one would what to read. So I'll leave it at:

Does Slaughter been know how to knit?!?!?

CWJ said...

And if so, does she knit American or continental style? Does she even know the difference?

CWJ said...

My goodness autocorrect hit me twice. What=want & been=even.

Kelly said...

My mom is turning 70 next year. Over the summer she was down sized from the job she loved and was depressed. That lasted for about a month and now she is running around all over the place not knitting. She has lunch dates, calls me to gripe about Obama, shops, watches her grandchildren. I wish I had half the energy that woman does.

Big Mike said...

If she'd rather crochet or do needle-point ...

t-man said...

What is it with HRC and her surrogates? Criticizing baking cookies, knitting, standing by their men...

Before you know it, HRC will hit the campaign trail wearing a series of stylish sweaters she knitted herself.

t-man said...

What is it with HRC and her surrogates? Criticizing baking cookies, knitting, standing by their men...

Before you know it, HRC will hit the campaign trail wearing a series of stylish sweaters she knitted herself.

Paco Wové said...

It seems like the most important thing, like Hippocrates said, is "first, do no harm". The Slaughters of the world always seem to overlook that part.

R. Chatt said...

It could be fun listening to Barack and Michelle campaigning for Hillary. "She's likable enough." "For the second time in my adult life I'm proud to be an American."
On second thought, maybe not. Excruciating would be more like it.

David said...

My grandmother used to say "Tend to your own knitting."

And she didn't knit.

William said...

Nothing against knitting, but I wish women would not do it while driving......This woman is probably convinced that she has unique talents and insights that make the world a better place. The guess here is that there are people on her staff who would beg to differ.

ALP said...

Where is Judy Chicago when you need her?

SOJO said...

I'm not near retirement age, but those I know who have fully retired don't do so well even when they keep busy. The people who continue to work part-time or consulting do far better - even when they have money, opportunities to travel, and family to enjoy.

If they're used to having a good job they get funny without one - one former high-end NASA guy is obsessive compulsive about lists and stays in his house trying different medications and financial tools because he's afraid of dying and also living with no money (he has millions); a former high-end attorney became depressed about loss of power/voice in the world and bought a gun which he never felt the need for before - and kept hallucinating people in the yard (medication);even without more 'regular' jobs people's minds began to go without the stimulation, order, etc.

So if you are high-functioning I can understand the reluctance. If you just hate your job (but have a pot of money to enjoy other things), it's obviously different.

Deb said...

Yeah, I know this thread is long dead but I dont' care. I took up knitting again when my Mom died. It was great therapy. And, 30 years to do what ever *I* want? Sounds good to me. And by the way, Anne-Marie Slaughter: bite me.

Elise Ronan said...

Slaughter shouldn't worry. According to statistics most people will not have enough money to retire at 70 and sit around and knit. Most will have to keep working as long as they are able. So she's worried about nothing.

Anglelyne said...

SOJO: So if you are high-functioning I can understand the reluctance. If you just hate your job (but have a pot of money to enjoy other things), it's obviously different.

Uh, no. It's not just a difference between the "high-functioning" and "people who hate their jobs". (Your assuming the "hate their jobs" bit indicates that you're not getting the point.) Just how "high-functioning" is the NASA dude you mentioned who can't think of any better use of his leisure than fussing about his meds and fearing death? Geez, the dumbest old cat ladies (who knit!) manage to swing that. Or your attorney who can't find "stimulation" in life without a title and an office? Anybody with means, leisure, and a brain who can't unbore himself has a deformed, limited view of life. They could, ya know, be using that leisure to fix that defect in their characters.

southcentralpa said...

If it's not a choice that a feminist thinks is right, then it's a choice a feminist will try and get rid of ...

Earth to Slaughter ... NOYB.