August 12, 2013

Color-strip test, late afternoon version.

Untitled

Untitled

Mid-morning version here.

48 comments:

annk said...

Far right!

Inga said...

2nd from the left.

Almost Ali said...

Frank Lloyd Wright; meet the rest of the Althouse.

The bookend-blues seem to be calling out from the bookshelf.

Possibly even a lighter shade of purple. Or is that lavender?

MayBee said...

I can't help but like the taupey-is of them, because it is fresh and looks like something you wouldn't get in a rental. It has purpose.

Freeman Hunt said...

I second the second from left. It doesn't gray with the day. (Earlier I thought the third. But look how it changed!)

Ann Althouse said...

I wonder if you'd be influenced to know the names of the colors:

1. Soft Violet
2. Swiss Coffee
3. Table Linen
4. Taupe Mist

I take it Maybee is referring to #4.

Freeman, you're going back and forth between the 2 that are still in the running. We're amazed by the differences at different times of day. But I thought #2 became oddly dark at times, as if it didn't bounce light as well. It's #3 that stays liveliest. I think!

I'm amazed at how dark #4 looks. It's practically white in the brochure.

I think it's interesting how #1, true to it's name, looks violet, because in the brochure, I couldn't see it.

When I look at all the afternoon play of light and shadow, especially in photo 1, it confirms my belief that the wall color isn't too important other than to bounce light. I want white to get the best bounce, effective at all times of day.

Irene said...

I like #2, "Swiss Coffee." In these images, #3, "Table Linen," looks pink.

tim maguire said...

The Second from left, with the slight greenish tint. It's the cheeriest.

Michelle Dulak Thomson said...

Table Linen for me. That's the one you are least likely to regret.

ad hoc said...

I like Swiss coffee; it looks good in both types of light. Maybe I like it because it's so neutral. What about at night in artificial light.

Big Mike said...

I still like linen white. I suppose "table linen" is pretty close.

Big Mike said...

I still like linen white. I suppose "table linen" is pretty close.

traditionalguy said...

To put the focus on people's faces and the furnishings in the room, # 4 color is a perfect background. Lightening up the room with white paint sounds very utilitarian, but a track lighting with some incandescent bulbs from your stash would work as well and add some heat too during North Country winter when reflected light is de minimis anyway.

Bob_R said...

I think #2 (Swiss Coffee? Do the Swiss put something yellow in their coffee?) as well. This is based on my impression that you don't like blue tints - your aversion to florescent lights is my only real evidence. Of course, daylight is very blue, and you probably use pretty warm tones in your artificial lighting. Definitely bring some lamps in - maybe shine them from the kitchen - and see what you think at night.

cubanbob said...

Ann a problem with the photographs is that the camera renders the colors differently than the eye sees them. Without a standard reference like a Pantone chart its difficult to compare what is photographed with what they eye sees. You and Meade spent a fair amount of money on good hardwood floors perhaps you should consider hiring an interior decorator to help you with the color selection. It's been a number of years since I used them so I don't know what kind of selection they offer today but Restoration Hardware used to have a limited but very well selected selection of colors.

cf said...

Can't believe I agree with Inga on anything haha.

Definitely of these, I like the second from left. It will wear winter well.

JackOfVA said...

I painted a bathroom in a color similar to #4 - looked several shades darker after it dried than the samples lead me to believe.

Wife thinks it's terrible, but I like it.

D. said...

What's the finish? flat, satin, semi gloss? White semi gloss would give the most light for a dark night.

Ann Althouse said...

"You and Meade spent a fair amount of money on good hardwood floors perhaps you should consider hiring an interior decorator to help you with the color selection."

Both of us have an artistic background and we feel very confident about our ability to make aesthetic choices. We enjoy the process of coming to consensus, and these posts are to include people who enjoy it too, which the previous discussion showed me is a big group of the readers.

Paddy O said...

No "leafy green." Sometimes I feel like my opinions just don't matter anymore...

MathMom said...

2nd from left. The cooler whites are going to seem very cold in winter. I always liked creamy whites in Anchorage - seemed sunny in all that darkness.

Kelly said...

Far right. A little color will highlight all the wood, not detract from it.

MPH said...

Drudge headline inference:

Our president is a joke.

#drudgetaposition

Ann Althouse said...

The trouble with color is: if you want very light, then color will be pastel. Given the dark wood ceiling and wood floors and wood trim around the windows, we want light walls.

Remember: the ceiling is medium toned wood, not a typical ceiling.

Augie Fartro said...

Allocate some money for an electrician. Or better fire coverage.

Henry said...

If I were the Swiss I would not be happy about "Swiss Coffee" being some kind of white.

Henry said...

Go with the least hue, the most white.

Lem said...

What Paddy O said...

BISkita said...

The thing about light-filled rooms is that they tend to reflect light. If you want warm tones to show you and your guests to advantage, then maybe consider a dark, purple-ish or brown taupe. You have enough space to carry it off, and the darkness of the walls will provide a nice warmth that is suitable to any season. And the room is large enough to carry a darker shade off.

Presley Bennett said...

So I take it you didn't just go down to Home Depot and find some reject paint that had been mixed up for someone else who never came by to pick it up. Or decided they didn't want it.

I think it's possible that the paint will look different once it's applied to properly prepared walls, primed and sanded, etc. If you put those samples up over the existing paint you might not be getting a completely accurate impression. Not that I really know what I'm talking about.

NotquiteunBuckley said...

OMG.

OMG.

Omg

It is happening.


Comments paying debts on time.

Like Alice in Chains " Over Now."

We paid our debts on time.

I would link but I would become more of a man by simply listening.

MayBee said...

Ann- yes, I'm talking about #4. I really like that. But then, I'm being influenced by the fact that we've moved so much and ended up in so many rented places, white walls give me the "someone else's house" feeling.

Swiss coffee looks to me like it could go lemon-y, but I do know that color was the color of choice for woodwork in my area in Southern California, so it must be able to take lots of light and not go lemon. Maybe it's just something my eyes are doing when comparing it to the other colors.

I don't think you can go wrong with any of them.

Ctmom4 said...

May I ask what brand of paint you are using? ( Apologies if this has been discussed already.) Benjamin Moore has a newish paint called Aura - the painter used it in our kitchen and I have to say it is quite nice.

RiverRat said...

I'm betting far left of the 4...no political intent

RiverRat said...

I'm betting far left swatch...without poly tick intent.

RigelDog said...

Third from the left. Definitely not the first and fourth; way too grey.

RigelDog said...

Second from the left; maybe the third if you want more warmth. Definitely not the first and fourth; way too grey.

Enlighten-NewJersey said...

Try Benjamin Moore elmira white.

AprilApple said...

Paint all that wood window casing white, then paint the walls a soft taupe (or whatever soft color you prefer.) That way the wood floor and the wood ceiling stand out as special.

Om said...

What is the tint base formula for each color? Tells you a lot about what to expect from the final product.

Something else to consider.

A decorator friend told me something interesting about colors/paint chips that are viewed side-by-side. If you look at a single color, it will look one way. If you look at two colors side-by-side, they will each look different than they do on their own. Just the way the brain processes color. Try it with some paint sample cards. It's pretty amazing (at least for those of us who don't have good color sense). You'd swear it was a different color. And of course when you paint a sample on the wall, you have one built-in *extra* color, namely the original wall color you're painting over.

Once you narrow it down to one or two choices, you might want to try painting a patch of the finalist(s) away from everything else.

Very lovely room and view. I'm jealous!

Om said...

And I second the vote for Aura. It's more expensive paint, but worth the cost. Colors look fabulous. More depth.

kristinintexas said...

Table linen! It's the warmest.

mrs. e said...

Interior double-hung windows on a porch addition. Love it - we've got them, too.

BTW, I think #3 goes best with all the exposed wood.

cubanbob said...

Both of us have an artistic background and we feel very confident about our ability to make aesthetic choices. We enjoy the process of coming to consensus, and these posts are to include people who enjoy it too, which the previous discussion showed me is a big group of the readers."

Sorry if I came accross as a bit of a dig. Wasn't my intention. What meant to say is that a good interior designer having lots of projects done can help you eliminate the colors that don't work and help narrow down to those that do work thus making it easier for the client to choose what works best for them.

Rob C said...

Possible methodology issue.

I think you'd be better doing a set of the four stripes with some separation between them. Right now they are all working with/against each other and it's hard to view each separately as it's own color (IMHO).

Also, what are your furniture and decoration colors? They either have to work with your choice or get replaced. (Oops, maybe that's the plan...)

Conserve Liberty said...

Oh my. This is all so complicated. Just paint the damned walls. Get close enough. Whatever you do you'll come to like it.

I have life. I have (some) liberty. Once I gave up pursuit of perfection I became much happier.

Dave said...

Whichever one's on sale.

Mom said...

What I recently learned from repainting every room in a new house: Don't paint the test swatches on a wall right beside each other like that. Instead, paint each one separately on its own big piece of white posterboard. That way the different choices won't compete with each other and alter each other the way they do in those thin stripes. The underlying wall color won't show through and alter the swatch color, the way it certainly will on the wall unless you put on several swatch coats. And most important, you can move the posterboard around the room and try it in different spots at different times of day. A color that looks one way beside a bright window looks completely different in a dark corner or beside a doorway leading to the colors in the next room. Plus, once you choose a color, you can use that nice big piece of posterboard to see how upholstery fabrics, rugs and such will work with your walls -- so much easier than a tiny chip! It works. Try it.