May 17, 2013

When the lawyer testifies against his client...

... and the client is O.J. Simpson.
[Yale] Galanter hesitated and spoke only after he paused, breathed deeply and was reminded that Simpson had waived attorney-client privilege.

"I'm very uncomfortable doing this," Galanter said.
Via TalkLeft, who says "Things aren't looking good for O.J., even though other lawyers involved in the case have supported O.J.'s claim of ineffective assistance of counsel...").

9 comments:

madAsHell said...

if the glove don't fit
you must acquit

wyo sis said...

I don't much care about OJ Simpson, but the degree I do care is convinced there is no truth to be found within 100 feet of him.

Mark O said...

I think the most dangerous allegation is that Yale told him he could go pick up his property. It seems innocuous, but it is a conflict of interest.

edutcher said...

I guess even lawyers have some standards.

/ducks

madAsHell said...

if the glove don't fit
you must acquit


Used also in Paula Jones' lawsuit.

Revenant said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Eric said...

Does the "My lawyer sucked" appeal ever actually bear fruit?

David said...

I once had a client waive privilege in a commercial dispute. Terrible mistake by the client (and his then lawyer) and very uncomfortable for me.

tim maguire said...

Eric said...Does the "My lawyer sucked" appeal ever actually bear fruit?

Yes.

It seems to me the lawyer should have withdrawn from representation because he was a potential witness.

Richard Fagin said...

David and Tim, I had an even worse experience. One of my patent clients put me on a witness list in a lawsuit tangentially related to my work for him. The other side had me subpoenaed as a witness. Even though I made the client waive privilege in writing, I'm still worry whether there was any way out of the situation without breaching attorney conduct rules.