February 27, 2013

"There were moments of joy and light but also moments that were not easy..."

"... there were moments, as there were throughout the history of the Church, when the seas were rough and the wind blew against us and it seemed that the Lord was sleeping."

A last message as Pope, from the man who, starting tomorrow, will be titled Pope Emeritus.

IN THE COMMENTS: EDH said:
Quit your complainin'!

It's not like he was married to Jennifer Garner. 

24 comments:

Shouting Thomas said...

Tough act, following in the footsteps of the giant, Pope John Paul II.

I don't know as much about Pope Benedict.

Lot of Catholic pundits are hoping for a black Pope from Africa.

Funny reason why... more likely to be a traditionalist in doctrine.

ricpic said...

He stood up to Islam.

MadisonMan said...

I hope he enjoys his retirement.

EDH said...

It would have been so bad ass if he did a 'mic drop'.

EDH said...

"There were moments of joy and light but also moments that were not easy... there were moments, as there were throughout the history of the Church, when the seas were rough and the wind blew against us and it seemed that the Lord was sleeping.

Quit your complainin'!

It's not like he was married to Jennifer Garner.

EMD said...

Damn. EDH beat me to it.

Mitchell the Bat said...

Sacrificing your daughter to Artemis will get you favorable winds but then you're just asking for trouble.

Craig said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Dolan said...

"I hope he enjoys his retirement."

His remaining days will be devoted to a secluded life of prayer, and that's not a program focused on enjoyment in the usual sense. "Joy" has a different meaning in this context - the sort of joy that comes from the simplification and clarity found in silence and arrived at by contemplation. It's a life a bit like that depicted in Rembrandt's Aristotle contemplating the bust of Homer, but substituting a crucifix for the poet; or Francis contemplating the crucifix while receiving the stigmata (the Van Eyck in the Philadelphia, or the Giotto, e.g.).

Here's wishing him every success. I think he will enjoy it, in his own way.

Richard Dolan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Bender said...

Popes do not "retire," they merely receive a new calling, a new task to do in continued service to God and the Church.

The Lord is calling me to "climb the mountain", to devote myself even more to prayer and meditation. But this does not mean abandoning the Church, indeed, if God is asking me to do this, then it is so that I can continue to serve the Church with the same dedication and the same love with which I have done thus far, but in a way that is better suited to my age and my strength.
--Pope Benedict, Angelus remarks of February 24, 2013

Roger J. said...

I respect Pope Benedict--for understanding the limitations that age forces upon him and, IMO, stepping down to let the church get on with its mission.

Would that more people in authority consider his example.

Bender said...

Pope Benedict, February 27, 2013 --
He who assumes the Petrine ministry no longer has any privacy. He belongs always and totally to everyone, to the whole Church. His life is, so to speak, totally deprived of the private sphere. I have felt, and I feel even in this very moment, that one receives one’s life precisely when he offers it as a gift. . . .
The “always” is also a “forever” - there is no returning to private life. My decision to forgo the exercise of active ministry, does not revoke this. I do not return to private life, to a life of travel, meetings, receptions, conferences and so on. I do not abandon the cross, but remain in a new way near to the Crucified Lord. I no longer wield the power of the office for the government of the Church, but in the service of prayer I remain, so to speak, within St. Peter’s bounds.

Bob said...

I respect that he stepped aside gracefully rather than occupy a position. The church needs a active leader to address problems, set direction, etc. He put the needs of the church ahead of his own. An excellent example. I wish him well in his remaining years.

I hope the conclave chooses well.

bpm4532 said...

Whining? There's no whining in the Vatican!

rhhardin said...

I'd recommend raising dogs rather then prayer and quiet contemplation if doing good is a consideration.

Bryan C said...

Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?

Methadras said...

May the pontiff find peace, serenity, and some comfort in his remaining years. I salute him for his attempt to try and right some wrongs.

Darrell said...

Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?

To those who love, it goes nowhere. And what do you mean? That a person lives longer than the doctors predicted (minutes to hours)? The Pope is aware that only God knows the time. Ask him if you don't believe me.

sydney said...

I am going to miss him, especially if his health keeps him from writing. It was his writings and his sermons (available at the Vatican website)that rekindled my faith.

kentuckyliz said...

I will miss him too. I really love his writings. He is very academic and has a powerful intellect, but he writes in a very clear and understandable way and with a gentleness--the same gentleness you hear in his soft German accent.

People's prejudices and stereotypes were against him as he started out--calling him the Panzerkardinal and stuff like that. But he transcended that by being who he is.

His encyclicals are Bible studies that move the heart--on faith, hope, and love, with a strong call to charity and social justice.

There is a hardness to our age and I hope what he taught softens hearts and brings a more humane note to our culture.

Please, mister, please
Don't play B16
It was his song
It was our song
But it's over

Also, I can see the change in his health. I wouldn't be surprised if he doesn't live a whole lot longer.

I hope he enjoys a restful, peaceful, spiritual, and happy retirement. He will pray and study and I think they're even moving in his piano.

I know he will hold us in his heart, and we will do likewise.

God bless B16.

Danke, Papa Benedikt.

Erika said...

Thomas, I suspect that the next hundred years will show an interesting reversal: the Church will be ascendant and triumphant in Africa and Asia, and those continents will send missionaries to convert the pagan Europeans and Americans.

Jose_K said...

According to Malaquy´s prophecies, the black pope would be the last before the end of the Catholic Church.
But a " black" pope could be a jesuit since they use black robes

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Malachy

In a serious matter, Latin America has more catholics than any other part of the world. And a latin american Pope is expected, specially when Evangelical Church are taking a bigger share.

Jose_K said...

Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?
I have a friend who received a teat saying positive to cancer. She understood it is all ok and left treatment. Now, she is receiving quimiotherapy. She bought 5 wigs in deferents colors. She is happy because her hair will grow better.
She goes to church every sunday